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19 9 3 

ANNUAL REPORT 




rOWN OF WILMINGTON 



INMEMORIAM 



ELIZABETH ANDREWS 
WILSON J. BELBIN 
ROGER F. BREAKEY 
PETER G. BREEN 
SALVATORE A. DEPASQUALE 
MARION FOREST 
SYLVIA LEVINE 
LAURENCE P. MELZAR 
JOSEPH H. WOODS, JR. 



(front cover) 

Jason Be re, Wilmington resident and outstanding high school pitcher is 
now a member of the Chicago White Sax. 

Jason was runner-up as American League 'Rookie of the Year' in 1993. 
In recognition of Jason's outstanding accomplishments, the Board of 
Selectmen declared February 8, 1994 as Jason Bere Day in the Town of 
Wilmington. 



Title Page 

Accepted Streets 40 

Animal Control Officer 29 

Board of Appeals 67 

Board of Assessors 18 

Board of Health 47 

Board of Registrars 20 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 9 

Carter Lecture Fund 55 

Constable 21 

Council for the Arts 82 

Department of Public Works 85 

Directory of Officials 8 

Disabilities, Commission on 66 

Elderly Services Commission 63 

Emergency Managment 29 

Fire Department 22 

Historical Commission 55 

Housing Authority 50 

Housing Partnership 38 

Inspector of Buildings 30 

Library 60 

Meeting Dates and Times 156 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 84 

Mission Statement 1 

Municipal Services Guide 13 

Officers & Department Heads 12 

Permanent Building Committee 21 

Planning/Conservation Department 30 

Police Department 25 

Public Buildings Department 56 

Recreation Commission 58 

Recycling Advisory Committee 46 

Redevelopment Authority 46 

Sealer of Weights and Measurers 62 

School Department 90 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational High School 101 

Telephone Directory by Department. . .' 158 

Town Accountant 133 

Town Clerk 19 

Town Collector/Treasurer 17 

Town Counsel 51 

Town Manager 5 

Town Meetings. . . . Special Recall Election - February 2, 1993 104 

Annual Town Election - April 17, 1993 105 

Annual Town Meeting - April 24, 1993 106 

Special Town Meeting - December 6, 1993 130 

Veterans' Services 59 

Water & Sewer Department 87 



The "Mission Statement for the Town of Wilmington" is as follows: 

"The Town of Wilmington, as a municipal corporation, exists in 
order to deliver a wide range of municipal services to those who 
live, work or own property within the borders of Wilmington; and 
in order to make this community a good place to live, to work, and 
to raise and educate a family, those services must be responsive 
to the needs of the people. They must be effective and efficient. 
Principles of honesty, fairness, dependability and compassion must 
govern the actions of the officials and the employees of the Town. 
Those who work for the Town as employees or as members of boards, 
committees and commissions are recognized as its most important 
resource and the key to its success in serving the people of 
Wilmington. " 

Endorsed by the Board of Selectmen May 22, 1989. 



-1- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
Massachusetts 

board of selectmen 



The Board of Selectmen have been actively involved in a number of initiatives 
and critical issues over the past twelve months. 

One of our most significant responsibilities is the appointment of individuals 
to key positions in our town government. Like the board of directors of many 
$35 million corporations, it is the Selectmen's responsibility to appoint the 
town's chief auditor, its legal counsel and the chief executive officer. The 
Board is pleased to state that Michael Morris has been reappointed to a three- 
year term as Town Accountant, Alan Altman has been reappointed to a one-year 
term as Town Counsel and Michael Caira has been reappointed to a three-year 
term as Town Manager. 

As a new initiative, the Board has invited department heads and their 
respective boards or commissions to attend a Selectmen's meeting. These 
meetings have allowed the Board to develop a better understanding of the roles 
and responsibilities of the other boards and commissions and to become 
informed about the significant challenges facing them. This open forum also 
serves to educate the public about the important part that each department 
plays in providing services to the town. One immediate benefit resulting from 
this interaction has been the completion of a townwide recreation survey. The 
survey was suggested to the Recreation Commissioners as a means to elicit 
comments and ideas about the satisfaction with existing programs and the 
desire for new ones. The survey results will prove helpful to an improved 
level of service. 

The Selectmen have taken the opportunity, on three separate occasions, to 
support affordable housing. In January, the Board executed a deed to transfer 
town-owned land on Houghton Road to the Wilmington Housing Authority in 
accordance with town meeting approval. An order of conditions was endorsed 
for the Local Initiative Petition by Thomas Realty Trust to construct 23 homes 
on Buckingham Estates, six units of which will be affordable housing. L.A. 
Associates has been approved by the Board as the designated developer for 
three units of affordable housing on Avon Street and Denault Drive. 

A series of complaints brought before the Selectmen regarding dangerous dogs 
prompted the reactivation of the town By-law Study Committee. The Board has 
requested that, as part of its review of town by-laws, the Committee 
investigate the possibility of increasing the fines to dog owners who have 
failed to leash or control their animals. Selectman Robert Cain has been 
appointed to serve as the Board's representative on the By-law Study 
Committee. 



-2- 



The Board of Selectmen have been actively supportive of several townwide 
projects in 1993. Selectman Diane M. Allan and Selectman Gerald R. Duggan 
have served as representatives on the Citizens Advisory Committee for the 
Small Cities Grant Progrcun. They have worked with the Committee members to 
provide valuable input to Small Cities staff about structuring the various 
programs offered through the grant. Members of the town's Strategic Planning 
Committee have kept the Board apprised of findings from that study and the 
recommended actions. In response to one recommendation stemming from the 
study, the Selectmen voted to support the concept of including underground 
utilities from Middlesex Avenue to Kirk Street as part of the Town Center 
project. After listening to a presentation from the Wilmington Redevelopment 
Authority, the Board gave its support to the conceptual plan for the Route 38 
corridor and requested that the Massachusetts Highway Department add the plan 
to its project listing and list the project on the state's Transportation 
Improvement Program (TIP). 

Town-owned conservation land was increased this year, thanks to generous gifts 
of land from Peter DeGennaro and John Benevento. Based upon recommendations 
from the Conservation Commission, the Board authorized acceptance of the 
parcels. The generosity of these landowners is sincerely appreciated. 

Board members have been involved with three other important issues which are 
expected to require our continued attention on into 1994. While Wilmington's 
assessment to the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) only 
increased 6% this year, the problem of rate equity continues. It is the 
Selectmen's belief that Wilmington is being overcharged for the town's limited 
use of the MWRA sewer facilities. The December 6, 1993 special town meeting 
authorized $1,500 to contribute to a legal fund for purposes of pursuing court 
action against the MWRA to force a change in their assessment formula. 

Selectman Michael V. McCoy serves as the Board's representative on the 
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) . It appears that Wilmington 
may be the victim of another erroneous assessment formula, this time at the 
hands of the MBTA. In addition to pursuing a more equitable assessment 
formula, the Board is pursuing increased transportation services to the town. 

Once again, Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) has become an issue of 
concern. RMLD officials are seeking to change the formula used to calculate 
the in-lieu-of-tax payments which are transferred to the Towns of Wilmington, 
North Reading and Lynnfield. The Board of Selectmen directed the town's 
representatives to RMLD Citizen's Advisory Board to engage the services of an 
independent consultant, with adec[uate funding provided by RMLD, to determine 
the net effect to the Town of Wilmington of a Net vs. Gross Plant calculation 
of revenues. 

The Selectmen were informed on two separate occasions this year that cable 
rates would be increasing. While the United States Congress should be 
commended for its efforts to bring cable television subscription rates under a 
greater level of control, recently enacted legislation has done little to stem 
the tide of cable rate increases for subscribers. As the town enters the 
three year negotiation process for cable license renewal, the Selectmen, as 
the licensing authority, will aggressively seek to use whatever leverage is 
available to ensure that Wilmington residents receive the best menu of 
programs at the most reasonable rates. 

The Selectmen wish to acknowledge and commend the Wilmington High School Boys' 
Track Relay Team for winning the State Championship, the Wilmington High 
School Girls' Softball Team for winning their State Championship and Jason 
Bere for his achievements as a professional baseball player. Such 
achievements truly bring a sense of pride to residents of Wilmington. 



-3- 



The Board of Selectmen also wishes to extend our appreciation to the Town 
Manager, Michael A. Caira and to all the town employees for their efforts to 
maintain the quality of life that residents have come to enjoy and expect. 
And to the volunteers who serve on the town's various committees and 
commissions, our hats are off to you for your unselfish donation of time and 
hard work. 

Chester A. Bruce, Jr. 
Chairman 




Seated left to right: Selectman Robert J. Cain, Chairman Chester A, Bruce, Jr., Selectman Diane M. Allan. Standing left to right- 
Selectman Michael V. McCoy, Selectman Gerald R. Duggan and Town Manager Michael A. Caira. 



-4- 



Town of Wilmington 

121 GLEN ROAD 
WILMINGTON MA 01887 



OFFICE OF THE FAX (508) 658 3334 

TOWN MANAGER TTY (SOS) 694 1417 

(SOS) 6S8 3311 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen anci Citizens of Wilmington: 

Municipalities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts have been particularly 
challengeci over the past several years to meet the pressing needs of its 
citizens. Coping with increasingly constrained revenues, cities and towns 
have sought alternative sources of funding to ensure that residents were well 
served and dollars were well managed. The Town of Wilmington was among those 
communities who were quick to react to a sluggish economy and the subsequent 
decrease in financial resources. In so doing, we have, as a government, been 
able to maintain and improve upon the delivery of municipal services. 
Additionally, the town has demonstrated the capacity to address future needs, 
particularly as they relate to maintaining and upgrading the town's property, 
infrastructure and capital ecjuipment. 

The town's conservative approach to governing has not diminished its ability 
to serve. Instituting operational efficiencies by consolidating tasks has 
allowed for a more optimum use of limited resources. Important programs have 
been funded through grants and donations and services have been enhanced 
through partnerships and volunteerism. 

In 1993, the town continued to focus significant attention to the area of 
economic development. Among the major businesses moving into Wilmington were 
Timberland Boot, MVP Sports, Pacific Packaging Products, Inc., Comfort Foods 
and Cellular One. By year's end, Wilmington's commercial vacancy rate had 
dropped from a high of 30% to around 8%. Likewise, Wilmington's unemployment 
rate, which once hovered at 10%, had dropped to just over 6%. Although 
economists are far from unanimous in their assessment of future trends, the 
business and employment climate in Wilmington has finally taken a turn for the 
better. 

As I write this report, officials from Sweetheart Cup are retrofitting their 
vacant Burlington Avenue manufacturing plant to accommodate the move of their 
Main Street warehouse operation. The warehouse is being purchased by 
International Paper Company, a Fortune 50 company, and will become the New 
England Division headc^uarters for Carter Rice/The Dowd Company. This purchase 
will bring more than 250 jobs to Wilmington, an increase in revenue for local 
businesses and an expansion of the town's tax base. Company representatives 
cited the efforts of town officials, who promoted Wilmington's positive 
business climate and worked with state officials to secure an easement over 
MBTA tracks, as a principal factor in their planned move to Wilmington. 

The town has made a considerable effort to enhance the economic vitality of 
the Town Center through a strategic planning program. As a result of the 
findings of the initial task force, a Town Center Committee has been appointed 
to guide the revitalization efforts. The town's Small Cities Program has 
enabled eligible Wilmington homeowners the opportunity to improve their 
property through housing rehabilitation grants. Hundreds of individuals have 
participated in the Employment Assistance Program which was cited by the 
television program, "Chronicle," for the unique benefit it brings to 
Wilmington residents. At the close of the initial grant program, Wilmington 
residents will have received $600,000 in program services at no cost to the 
property owner. 



-5- 



The successful solicitation of grant funding has enabled the town to offer 
services it otherwise could not offer. The Board of Health received a $25,000 
Tobacco Cessation Program Grant from the State Department of Public Health. 
The goal of the program is to significantly reduce smoking in Wilmington by 
the year 2000 and to implement a townwide educational, informational and 
enforcement program. The Wilmington Police Department has begun to implement 
an ambitious community policing program as a result of a $75,000 grant from 
the Massachusetts Commission on Criminal Justice. The Police Department has 
also obtained funding to supplement their drug awareness programs and to 
assist in enforcement efforts to combat drunk driving. 

Several town programs were cited for excellence in 1993. The 

Treasurer/Collector's office received a commendation from the Internal Revenue 
Service for error free reporting. The Fire Department was honored at State 
House ceremonies for outstanding community service in recognition of their 
fire prevention and safety outreach programs. The town was honored by the 
Massachusetts Municipal Association for "best overall safety performance" in 
the area of employee safety for communities with a population greater than 
15,000. 

Many new initiatives were undertaken during the past year. One of the most 
important was the implementation of a townwide residential curbside recycling 
program. This program was implemented within the constraints of the solid 
waste budget and is testimony to the perseverance of Jeff Hull, Bob Palmer and 
the members of the Recycling Advisory Committee. 

Town meeting members recognized the need to upgrade the town's capital 
equipment by purchasing four police cruisers, two public works' trucks and a 
much needed fire engine pumper. The town meeting also authorized the purchase 
of $30,000 worth of elementary and intermediate school classroom furniture as 
well as the purchase of computer equipment for Wilmington High School. The 
Police Department upgraded its mobile communication system with the purchase 
and installation of mobile radio units and data terminals for its front-line 
cruisers allowing cruiser linkup with the State Police, Registry of Motor 
Vehicles and the National Criminal Enforcement Network. 

Town meeting members voted to appropriate just over $77,000 from the Capital 
Stabilization Fund to purchase and install an improved central telephone 
system and for a furnace for the Town Hall. The voters also approved the 
expenditure of $34,000 to replace a section of the roof at the Woburn Street 
School. The Capital Stabilization Fund has since been replenished with nearly 
$100,000 as a result of the disposition of Town-owned property and the sale of 
surplus equipment. 

The Department of Public Works constructed a new Softball field at Wilmington 
High School. Although this project began prior to last year's softball 
season, it was especially fitting that the Wilmington High School Girls' 
Softball Team earned the Division II Statewide title in June of 1993. Work 
was also started, thanks in great measure to the Army National Guard, on the 
renovation and expansion of the Town Hall fields. Upon completion there will 
be four Little League sof tball/baseball fields and an improved football field 
to accommodate Wilmington Pop Warner. 

Chapter 90 construction funds allowed the town to improve, through paving, 
more than 25 town streets, including Glen Road, Chestnut Street, Nichols 
Street and portions of West Street and Middlesex Avenue. The Public Works' 
crew was at its busiest, however, during the snow season. Nearly 100 inches 
of snow was recorded in Wilmington during the 1992/1993 winter season. 

A Computerized Process Monitoring and Control System was designed for 
installation at the Butters Row Water Treatment Plant. The Water Department 
instituted a Cross-Connection Control Program designed to protect the water 
system from private use contaminants. A leak detection survey and the Lead 
and Copper Testing Program were among several initiatives undertaken by the 
Water and Sewer Department. 



The town meeting voted to adopt the recommendation of the Sewer Finance 
Advisory Board to petition the Legislature to change the town's Sewer Enabling 
Legislation in order to allow for greater flexibility in determining the 
method for funding sewer construction projects. The town was also successful 
in centralizing its collection system by consolidating the water and sewer 
billing function within the Treasurer/Collector's office. 

The town continued in its efforts to comply with the mandates of the Americans 
With Disabilities Act through a coordinated monitoring and inspection effort 
with the Commission on Disabilities. Among other expenditures was the 
purchase of a computerized engraving machine enabling the town to efficiently 
engrave signage in compliance with ADA laws governing all public buildings. 
This particular machine contains the technology to produce braille and raised 
lettering. 

The town continues to benefit from the generosity of many volunteers and civic 
organizations. The Wilmington Garden Club's town beautif ication efforts and 
the Winchester Family Medical Center's donation of two def ibrilators to the 
Fire Department are but two of scores of examples of the spirit of 
volunteerism that supports town programs. 

Several town employees retired in 1993. These included Percival "Chuck" 
Cornish of the Department of Public Works, Barbara White, Circulation 
Librarian, Firefighter Keith Marshall and Barbara Buck from the Water and 
Sewer Department. Each of these employees exemplified the best in town 
government. In addition. Fire Chief Daniel Wandell retired after a 
distinguished career as a Firefighter and Deputy Fire Chief and for the past 
14 years as Wilmington's Fire Chief. Chief Wandell was replaced by Daniel 
Stewart, whose brief tenure as Chief clearly indicates that the leadership of 
the Fire Department has been left to "good hands." 

G. K. Chesterson said, "I do not believe in a fate that falls on men however 
they act, but I do believe in a fate that falls on them unless they act." 
There are many challenges that lie ahead for the citizens of Wilmington; 
challenges that will require action and challenges that I am confident will 
continue to be met with a single premise in mind - "to do what is right for 
the good of the community." 



Respectfully submitted. 




Michael A. Caira 
Town Manager 




Left to right: Chairman Chester A. Bruce, Jr., Town Manager 
Michael A. Caira and Police Chief Bobby N. Stewart saluting the 
flag during the Memorial Day Parade. 



-7- 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - Ja nuary 1. 1994 



Board of Selectmen 



Chester A. Bruce, 
Robert J. Cain 
Gerald R. Duggan 
Diane M. Allan 
Michael V. McCoy 



Jr., Chairman 



1995 
1994 
1995 
1996 
1996 



Town Manager 



Michael A. Caira 



Moderator 



James C. Stewart 



1994 



School Committee 



Bradford L. Jackson, Chairman 
Paul R. Palizzolo, Vice Chairman 
Linda T. McMenimen, Secretary 
Shirley F. Callan 
Robert G. Peterson 
James A. Demos 
Robert W. Young 



1995 
1995 
1995 
1994 
1994 
1996 
1996 



Superintendent of Schools 



Geraldine A. O'Donnell 



Finance Committee 



George W. Hooper, Chairman 

John F. Doherty III, Vice Chairman 

Steven W. Leet, Secretary 

Philip J. Spelman 

Thomas E. Casey 

John M. Walsh 

Ann Yurek 

Anthony Capuano 

Richard D. Duggan 



1994 

1996 
1994 
1994 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1996 
1996 



-8- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 1993 



Term 
Expires 



Appeals. Board of 

Charles E. Boyle, Chairman 1996 

Louis J. Farkas, Jr. 1994 

Philip A. Fenton, Sr. 1995 

Donald C. Armstrong, Assoc. 1994 

Anita H. Backman, Assoc. 1994 

John R. Forrest, Assoc. 1994 



Assessors, Board of 

Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal 

Roger J. Lessard 

James J. Russo 

By-Law Study Committee 

Bernard P. Nally, Chairman 

James F. Banda 

Robert J. Cain 

Walter J. Kciminski 

Bruce MacDonald 

Kathleen M. Scanlon 

Carter Lecture Fund Committee 



H. Elizabeth White, Chairman 1995 

Ann H. Berghaus, Secretary 1994 

Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treas. 1994 

Adele C. Passmore 1995 

Andrea B. Houser 1996 

Cemetery Commission 

William F. Cavanaugh, Jr., Chmn.1994 

William H. Russell 1995 

Willis C. Lyford 1996 

Conservation Commission 

Gary W. Mercer, Chairman 1995 

Lynne S. Guzinski, V. Chairman 1996 

William D. MacKinnon, Jr. 1994 

M. Barbara Sullivan 1994 

James H. Morris 1995 

John A. White, Jr. 1995 

William F. C. Gately 1996 

Disabilities. Wilmington Commission On 

Richard Gage, Chairman 1996 

Laurence W. Curtis 1994 

Gerald R. Duggan 1994 

Frank A. Botte 1995 

Lillian N. Brown 1995 

Phyllis P. Genetti 1996 



Term 
Expires 



Elderly Services Commission 

Marilyn K. McCarthy, Chairman 1996 

Joseph C. Filipowicz, V. Chmn. 1995 

Rocco V. DePasquale 1996 

Evelyn T. Kaminski 1994 

Grace Kirkland 1994 

Lillian Brown 1995 

Henry C. Latta 1995 



Hazardous Waste Committee 
Gregory P. Erickson, Coordinator 
Walter J. Sowyrda, Emergency Mgmt. 
Milton E. Calder, Sr., Board of Health 
Bobby N. Stewart, Police Chief 
Daniel R. Stewart, Fire Chief 



Health, Board of 

James A. Ficociello, Chairman 1995 

Milton E. Calder, Sr. 1994 

Joseph A. Paglia 1996 

Historical Commission 

Carolyn R. Harris, Chairman 1996 

Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treasurer 1995 

Frank J. West 1994 

Kevin P. Backman 1995 

James T. Murray 1996 

Jean M. Rowe 1996 

Housing Authority 

Alfred N. Meegan, Jr., Chmn. 1997 

Charles R. Fiore, Jr., V. Chmn. 1998 

Dorothy A. Butler, Treas. 1995 

Melvin F. Keough 1994 

♦Lillian Hupper 1998 
*Rep. of State Housing Authority 



Housing Partnership 

Carole S. Hamilton, Chairman 

Raymond G. Forest, V. Chmn. 

Charles E. Boyle 

Robert J. Cain 

Rocco V. DePasquale 

Robert DiPalma 

Gregory P. Erickson 

Charles R. Fiore, Jr. 

Mark T. Haldane 

Bruce MacDonald 

James J. Russo 

Rev. Michael Stotts 

Lester E. White 

Lynn Goonin Duncan, Director 



-9- 



Boards. Committees & Commissiona 1993 



Term 
Expires 



Library Trustees 

Patricia F. Duggan, Chairman 1994 

James F. Banda, V. Chairman 1996 

Kenneth J. Miller 1994 

Lawrence P. Flaherty 1995 

Martha K. Stevenson 1995 

Anne Buzzell 1996 

Permanent Building Committee 

Roger J. Lessard, Chairman 1996 

Michael P. Dolan 1994 

Alberto Angles, Jr. 1995 

Mark T. Haldane 1996 

Planning Board 

Richard A. Longo, Chairman 1995 

William G. Hooper, Jr., Clerk 1994 

James Diorio 1996 

Carole S. Hamilton 1997 

Austin L. Rounds 1998 

Recreation Commission 

William Savosik, Chairman 1994 

Paul J. Bova, V. Chairman 1995 

C. Michael Burns, Sec. 1996 

James J. Buckley 1994 

Larry G. Noel 1995 



Recycling Advisory Committee 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 

Kevin Brander 

Elizabeth D. Harriman 

Anne C. Leary 

Thomas A. Ollila 

Joseph A. Paglia 

Robert P. Palmer 

Rev. Judy Thomson 

Edward P. Tripp, III 

Redevelopment Authority 
Vaughn R. Surprenant, Chairman 1997 
Charles N. Gilbert, V. Chairman 1996 
Dennis J. Volpe, Secretary 1998 
Sidney R. Kaizer, Treasurer 1995 
Patricia F. Duggan*, Asst. Trea.1998 
* State Appointment 

Regional Vocational Technical School 
Committee 

John M. Gillis, Chairman 1995 
Michael E. Smith 1994 



Term 
Expires 



Registrars. Board of 

Audrey E. Riddle, Chairman 1994 

Barbara J. Buck 1995 

Edward L. Sousa 1996 



Kathleen M. Scanlon, Clerk 

Town Center Committee 
Lynn G. Duncan, Chairman 
Diane M. Allan 
Robert J. Cain 
Michael A. Caira 
Marianne Carpenter 
Jay J. Donovan 
Patricia F. Duggan 
Raymond G. Forest 
Charles N. Gilbert 
Carole S. Hamilton 
Jeffrey M. Hull 
David Katz 
Joseph Langone 
Richard A. Longo 
Michael N. Matt 
Humphrey Moynihan 
Joseph R. Peters 
Margaret Quinn 
James J. Russo 
Ruth Stedman 
Stanley Stedman 
Vaughn R. Surprenant 
David Wilson 



Town Forest Committee 

Robert P. Palmer, Chairman 1994 

Paul C. Duggan 1995 

Forrest G. Downs 1996 

Trustees of Trust Funds 

Elizabeth L. Coville 1994 

Michael Morris 1994 

Joseph R. Peters 1994 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 

Noel D. Baratta, Sr., Chairman 1996 
Jonathan Goldfield, V. Chairman 1994 

Neil E. Waisnor 1995 

Wilmington Arts Council 

H. Elizabeth White, Chairman 1994 

Edith M. Michelson, V. Chmn. 1994 

Frances Keough, Cor. Sec. 1995 
Daniel H. Ballou, Sr. Rcdg. Sec. 1995 

Mary R. Orner, Treasurer 1994 

Anne Buzzell 1994 

Annette Campbell 1994 

Carmelo J. Corsaro 1994 

Marguerite Elia 1994 

Bruce E. Jope 1994 

Tina Prentiss 1994 

Francis T. Toohey 1994 

Jane Crane 1995 

Evelyn Choate Gibbs 1995 

David Maison 1995 



-10- 



Boards, Committees & CommiagionB 1993 



Term 
Expires 



Wilmington Election Officers 



Precinct 1 Annually 
Mary D'Eon, Warden " 
Helen F. Sears, Dep. Warden 
Sandra S. Volpe, Clerk " 
Phyllis M. Flaherty, Dep. Clerk 
Edith Ann Graham, Inspector 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Marjorie Metcalfe, Dep. Insp. 



Term 

Expires 



Precinct 4 Annually 
Sarah H. Cosman, Warden 

Willieun H. Russell, Dep. Warden " 

Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Clerk " 

Mary O'Rourke, Dep. Clerk " 

Mary J. Johnson, Inspector " 

Joan Searfoss, Inspector " 

Louise M. Wallent, Dep. Insp. " 

Marlene Moran, Warden " 



Precinct 2 

Andrea Houser, Warden " 
Jean Buck, Dep. Warden " 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Clerk " 
Helen DelTorto, Dep. Clerk 
Patricia Cagnina, Inspector 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector " 
Elizabeth Grise, Dep. Inspector 
Melissa Nobile, Dep. Inspector " 



Precinct 5 

Margaret Blonigen, Dep. Warden 
Judith A. Simmons, Dep. Clerk 
Sandra Curtin, Inspector 
Joan Goulet, Dep. Inspector 
Mary Husen, Dep. Inspector 
Jeanne LeFavour, Dep. Inspector 



Precinct 3 

Mary E. Woods, Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Dep. Warden 
Ruth J. Bedell, Clerk 
Minnie Kirby, Inspector 
Norinne M. Markey, Inspector 
Alice Marcy, Dep. Inspector 
Beverly Vokey, Dep. Inspector 



Precinct 6 

Nancy J. Tarricone, Warden 

Nancy Bodenstein, Dep. Warden 

Evelyn W. Conlin, Clerk 

Sandra Murphy, Dep. Clerk 

Jean Draper, Inspector 

Marion C. Murphy, Dep. Inspector 



-11- 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1. 1994 



Account^cin^ 


Michael Morris 


694 


-2029 




Margaret A. Tarantino 


658 


-3311 




Ellen G. Davis 


658 


-7845 


Assis'tsin't Town MandQeir 


Jeffrey M. Hull 


658 


-3311 




Humphrey J. (Skip) Moynihan 658 


-3675 


ConS'tdlDl6 


Charles L. Ellsworth 


658 


-3078 


Elderly Services Director 


Edith Cunningheun 


657 


-7595 


Emergency Management Director 


Walter J. Sowyrda 


658 


-3346 


f Xllall^c i^xxcr^i.wx 


Joseph R. Peters 


658 


-3531 


Fire Chief 


Daniel R. Stewart 


658 


-3346 


Gas Inspector 


William R. Harrieon 


658 


-3223 


Housing Authority Exec. Director 


Kenneth G. Dorrance 


658 


-8531 


Inspector of Buildings 


James J. Russo 


658 


-4531 


Ipswich Watershed Commission 


Herbert D. Nickerson 


658 


-4207 


Librarian 


Philip W. Meriam 


658 


-2967 


Mass. Bay Transportation 
Authority Advisory Board 


Michael V. McCoy 


658 


-3311 


Mass. Water Resource Authority 
Advisory Board Rep. 


Jeffrey M. Hull 


658 


-3311 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


Jay J. Donovan 


658 


-3181 


Middlesex County Advisory Board 


Robert J. Cain 


658 


-4772 


Northeast Solid Waste Committee 


Michael A. Caira 


658 


-3311 


Planning/Conservation Director 


Lynn G. Duncan 


658 


-8238 


Plumbing Inspector 


William R. Harrison 


658 


-3223 


Police Chief 


Bobby N. Stewart 


658 


-5071 


Public Buildings Superintendent 


Roger J. Lessard 


658 


-3017 


Public Health Director 


Gregory P. Erickson 


658 


-4298 


Public Health Nurse 


Ann V. Fitzgerald, R.N. 


694 


-2041 


Public Works Superintendent 


Robert P. Palmer 


658 


-4481 


Reading Municipal Light Department 
Advisory Board 


Kenneth Mastrullo 
Roger J. Lessard 


658 
658 


-5600 
-3017 


Recreation Director 


Ronald N. Swasey 


658 


-4270 


Redevelopment Authority, Consultant 


Michael N. Matt 


657 


-5649 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


James J. Babineau 


617-665- 


-8301 


Town Clerk 


Kathleen M. Scanlon 


658 


-2030 


Town Counsel 


Alan Altman 


658 


-3388 


Town Engineer 


Harold R. Gillam 


658 


-4499 


Town Manager 


Michael A. Caira 


658 


-3311 


Veterans' Agent /Grave Officer 


Paul A. Farrell 


694 


-2040 


Water & Sewer Superintendent 


Paul Niman 


658 


-4711 


Wiring Inspector 


James J. Russo 


658 


-4531 



-12- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON MUNICIPAL SERVICES GUIDE 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 



Board of Selectmen (Meeting dates-2nd & 4th Monday eve. 7:00 p.m.) 

The Board of Selectmen is recognized by the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts as the Town's chief elected officials. The Board is 
responsible for appointing the Town Manager, the Board of Appeals, the Town 
Counsel and the Town Accountant. The Selectmen are also responsible for 
issuing numerous licenses including alcohol licenses, common victualer 
licenses and licenses to operate automobile dealerships. The Selectmen serve 
on a part-time basis. Phone 658-3311 

Chester A. Bruce, Jr., Chairman 

Diane M. Allan 

Robert J. Cain 
Gerald R. Duggan 
Michael V. McCoy 



Town Manager - Michael A. Caira - 658-3311 

The Town Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of the Town. He 
supervises and directs the administration of all departments, boards and 
commissions except for the Board of Selectmen, Town Moderator, Finance 
Committee, Schools, Board of Appeals, Election Officers and Registrars of 
Voters. His duties include the appointment and removal, if necessary, of 
staff and members of certain boards and commissions; attendance at all 
regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of Selectmen to advise and recommend 
specific courses of action regarding issues affecting the Town; representing 
the Town in all litigation to which the Town is a party; acting as the Chief 
Fiscal Officer of the Town; preparation and administration of a comprehensive 
annual budget and directing the procurement of all goods and services on 
behalf of the Town. 



Assistant Town Manager - Jeffrey M. Hull - 658-3311 

The Assistant Town Manager is responsible for the Town's health, workmans 
compensation, general liability, property, automobile, etc. insurances; 
developing the Town's recycling program and insuring that the Town meets the 
procurement regulations established by the State. The Assistant serves as the 
Town's designee on the MWRA Advisory Board; assists with the preparation of 
the annual budget and provides general assistance to the Town Manager in other 
areas of municipal administration. 



Town Clerk - Kathleen M. Scanlon - 658-2030 

State law assigns duties to the Town Clerk in three major areas, the keeping 
of records and documents, the issuance of licenses, and the administration of 
elections. In terms of the Town records, the Clerk records proceedings of all 
town meetings and elections. The Town Clerk is Registrar of all vital 
statistics and Filing Officer for birth and death certificates, zoning 
decisions, etc. The Clerk's office also issues marriage licenses, fish and 
game licenses, dog licenses, etc. The Clerk acts as supervisor of all 
elections and serves as clerk of the Board of Registrars. 



-13- 



FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 



Town Accountant - Michael Morris - 658-2029 

The Accounting Department reviews all recpjests for payment which involve Town 
funds. The department prepares warrants on a weekly basis for payment of all 
bills owed by the Town. The Accountant maintains the complete official 
financial records of the Town and prepares other financial records and reports 
as needed. Additionally, this office participates in the preparation of the 
annual budget. 

Principal Assessor - Humphrey J. "Skip" Moynihan - 658-3675 

The main responsibility of the Board of Assessors is to levy the property 
taxes necessary to meet appropriations and to ensure that taxes are allocated 
equitably on the basis of the property owned by each taxpayer. The assessors 
are required to compute the tax rate and assess all real and personal property 
within the Town at fair-market value i.e. close to the true market value, 
except for property qualifying for preferential assessments such as forest, 
agricultural or recreation land. Tax rates depend on three factors: (1) the 
valuation of taxable property, (2) the tax levy or amount to be raised from 
property taxation and (3) property classification. 



Finance Director - Joseph R. Peters - 658-3531 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the billing and collection of 
monies due the Town including property and motor vehicle excise taxes and 
charges for water, sewer and ambulance services. This department is 
responsible for preparing the weekly payroll. The Finance Director monitors 
the Town's cash flow and arranges for short-term and long-term borrowing. The 
department serves as custodian of all Town funds. All municipal bank accounts 
are controlled by this office. The tax title and foreclosure proceedings for 
non-payment of taxes are handled by the Finance Director. 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



Planning/Conservation Director - Lynn G. Duncan - 658-8238 

The major responsibilities of the Planning Department are to: undertake 
studies of land use, economic development, housing, transportation, and other 
matters related to community development; compile and maintain maps, 
statistics and records related to land use and development; review individual 
proposals for development and for compliance with the subdivision regulations 
and zoning by-law; and prepare applications and administer grants related to 
planning and development. 

The primary function of the Conservation Department is the administration and 
enforcement of the Wetlands Protection Act, Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
131, Section 40. The Act is intended to protect seven public interest issues 
related to wetlands: flood control, storm damage prevention, protection of 
public and private water supply, protection of ground water supply, prevention 
of pollution, protection of fisheries, and protection of land containing 
shellfish. Some of the department's responsibilities include reviewing and 
inspecting development projects to ensure their compliance with the Town and 
State wetlands statutes. In addition, the department manages several pieces 
of property throughout Town which have been placed into the Town's custody as 
conservation land. 



-14- 



Building Inspector - Jamea J. Ruaso - 658-4531 



The Building Inspector interprets and enforces the Town's Zoning By-Law, the 
State Uniform Building Code and certain other State codes. This department 
provides assistance to the Zoning Board of Appeals, architects, engineers, 
contractors, and individual property owners in preparing zoning cases, plans 
and permit applications. The Building Inspector is responsible for plumbing, 
gas fitting and wiring inspections. 

Director of Public Health - Gregory P. Erickson - 658-4298 

The department provides two primary types of service. Inspect ional services 
including restaurant, retail food stores, cafeterias in industrial buildings 
and schools, all mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks and caterers. In 
addition the department conducts percolation tests for the location of septic 
systems, septic system inspections, nuisance inspections and responds to 
citizens complaints regarding dumping, air pollution and noise pollution and 
hazardous waste spills. The department provides public nursing services. 
This includes an annual rabies clinic for dogs, and immunization for 
influenza, pneumonia, polio and various other diseases. The Town Nurse 
provides blood pressure and cholesterol screenings to Town residents. In 
addition the nurse provides home health care visits to elderly residents of 
the Town. 

PUBLIC SAFETY 



Fire Chief-Daniel R. Stewart-658-3346 — Emergency Number-658-3200 

The main responsibilities of the Wilmington Fire Department are prevention and 
extinguishing of fires. Members of the department make regular fire safety 
inspections of nursing homes, places of public assembly and schools. All 
outdoor burning is regulated by law. These permits may be obtained from the 
Fire Department. The department also issues permits for oil burner 
installations, the storage of flammable liquids such as gasoline and the 
purchase, storage and/or use of explosives such as dynamite, rockets and gun 
powder. The Fire Department provides emergency medical services to residents 
of Wilmington. Firefighters trained as Emergency Medical Technicians are 
assigned as aunbulance attendants. Two ambulances provide emergency services 
and urgent patient transport. 



Police Chief-Bobby N. Stewart-658-5071 — Emergency Number-658-3331 

The principle responsibility of the Wilmington Police Department is the 
protection of people and property through enforcement of criminal laws and 
traffic regulations. The department also enforces certain local by-laws and 
provides public education such as the DARE program. Animal Control services 
are provided through this department. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



Superintendent - Robert P. Palmer - 658-4481 or 658-4484 

The Public Works Department is responsible for highways, trees, parks, 
cemeteries, water, sewers, refuse and recycling. The Highway Division is 
responsible for the care and maintenance of the roads, sidewalks, parking 
areas, and traffic lights. The Engineering Division assists town departments, 
boards and commissions with engineering related projects, such as drainage 
problems, review of subdivision plans and inspection of subdivision roadway 
construction. The Parks & Grounds Division is responsible for the maintenance 
of the Town's commons, parks and recreation areas. The Tree Division is 
responsible for the Town's public shade and orneunental trees and maintenance 
of the trees on the Town common. The Public Works Department is also 
responsible for the operation of the Town's water supply, distribution, 
treatment systems, septic pumping stations, the sanitary sewer collection 
systems and the septic disposal station. These responsibilities are assumed 



-15- 



by the Water & Sewer Division. The Division operates two water treatment 
plants in accordance with regulations established by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the federal 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 

In addition, the Public Works Department operates a curbside recycling program 
for many household items, maintains a composting center for grass and leaf 
disposal and oversees a contract for residential solid waste collection and 
for curbside leaf and grass pick-up. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 



Superintendent - Roger J. Lessard - 658-3017 or 658-8124 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for approximately 516,000 
square feet of building space. The department provides custodial services for 
all school buildings and most of the general government buildings. In 
addition to the custodial services, the department repairs and maintains all 
of the Town's municipal buildings. Public Buildings provides for the complete 
set-up at all Town elections and the annual and special town meetings. 



HUMAN SERVICES 



Elderly Services Director - Edith L. Cunningham - 657-7595 

Programs are provided for the elderly in a wide range of areas, both on an 
individual and group basis. Examples of the types of programs include health 
information, educational classes, meals on wheels, recreational activities, 
housing assistance, transportation and counselling. Additional services 
included assistance with social security and medicaid concerns. 



Library Director - Philip W. Meriam - 658-2967 

Library services are provided at the Wilmington Memorial Library. The library 
seeks to provide basic educational, informational and recreational library 
services. Staff provides reference and reader services to adults and 
children, furnishing access to the wide spectrum of information available in 
books and other materials. Technical services utilizes the tools of library 
technology to provide the means for informational access and retrieval. The 
library is a member of the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium, a twenty-six 
member consortium of towns in the Merrimack Valley area. This membership 
allows library patrons to access library resources in each of the twenty-six 
member towns. 



Recreation Director - Ronald N. Swasey - 658-4270 

The Recreation Department provides a wide variety of leisure programs for 
children and adults. Some of the programs offered through this department 
include a summer swimming program for children, volleyball for adults, the 
Tiny Tots program, summer recreation progrcun for children, ladies fitness, day 
trips to Provincetown and New York City, the Horribles Parade at Halloween and 
a number of other programs. In addition the Recreation Department offers 
resources for travel such as discounts to Walt Disney World. 



Veterans' Agent - Paul A. Farrell - 694-2040 

The Veterans' Agent administers a State public assistance program for veterans 
and their dependents who qualify. Financial aid which, is reimbursed in a 
large part by the Commonwealth, is rendered in the form of cash grants to 
cover such items as living expenses and medical bills. The Veteran's Agent 
also offers assistance in applying for pensions and other progreims 
administered by the United States Veterans Administration. 



-16- 



Town Collector/Treasurer 



COMMITMENTS 












1995 Real Estate 


$ 




953 . 


80 


1994 Real Estate 


23 , 


511, 


449 . 


10 


1993 Real Estate 






470 . 


57 


1994 Personal Property 




504 , 


359 • 


12 


1993 Excise 




1 , 


220 , 


550 . 


49 


1992 Excise 






33 , 


529 . 


57 


1991 Excise 








uu • 


00 


1990 Excise 








106 . 


25 


1989 Excise 








192 . 


50 


1988 Excise 








125 . 


83 


1987 Excise 








166 . 


2 5 


Ambulance 






111 , 


822 . 


60 


Apportioned 


Sewer Paid in Full 




5 , 


757 . 


87 


Interest 








278 . 


91 


Apportioned 


Sewer 




20 , 


915 . 


61 


Interest 






9 , 


484 . 


34 


Apportioned 


Street Paid in Full 




8, 


898 . 


39 


Interest 








697 . 


86 


Apportioned 


Street 




5 , 


577 • 


07 


Interest 






2 , 


780 . 


57 


Apportioned 


Water 




3, 


221. 


61 


Interest 








991. 


08 


Sewer Lien 






27, 


304. 


25 


Water Lien 






114, 


094. 


24 


Water Lien Paid in Advance 




1, 


586. 


11 






$25, 


585, 


513. 


99 



COLLECTIONS 

All Other 

1994 1993 Years Total 



Real Estate 


$10, 


261, 


900 


02 


$11 


215, 


921. 


09 


$190 


,998 


03 


$21, 


669, 


772 


94 


Interest 




13, 


367 


52 




52, 


013. 


19 


55 


,067 


93 




120, 


448 


64 


Charges 












2, 


185. 


00 




500 


00 




2, 


685 


00 


Personal Property 




226, 


589 


05 




266, 


173. 


12 


1 


,268 


29 




494, 


030 


46 


Interest 






49 


22 






904. 


43 




200 


11 




1, 


153 


76 


Charges 














175. 


00 




15 








190 


00 


Water Liens 




2, 


292 


71 




78, 


165. 


57 


7 


,236 


21 




87, 


694 


49 


Apportioned Water 












1, 


918. 


42 




166 


44 




2, 


084 


86 


Interest 














763. 


08 




58 


25 






821 


33 


Apportioned Street 












4, 


439. 


61 










4, 


439 


61 


Interest 












2, 


401. 


97 










2, 


401 


97 


Apportioned Street 
































Paid in Full 












8, 


825. 


20 










8, 


825 


20 


Interest 














211. 


09 












211 


09 


Sewer Liens 






791 


68 




14, 


023. 


72 


1 


,660 


70 




16, 


476 


10 


Apportioned Sewer 






152 


18 




14, 


588. 


47 




575 


69 




15, 


316 


34 


Interest 






82 


31 




7, 


175. 


88 




541 


33 




7, 


799 


52 


Apportioned Sewer 
































Paid in Full 












5, 


757. 


87 










5, 


757 


87 


Interest 














278. 


91 












278 


91 


Sewer Betterment 












4, 


486. 


35 




185 


42 




4, 


671 


77 


Interest 












2, 


442. 


43 




136 


64 




2, 


579 


07 


Street Betterment 












2, 


138. 


66 




166 


25 




2, 


304 


91 


Interest 












1, 


063. 


73 




83 


12 




1, 


146 


85 


Water Betterment 














477. 


99 












477 


99 


Interest 














225. 


87 












225 


87 


Ambulance 












116, 


884. 


35 










116, 


884 


35 


Lien Certificates 












50, 


050. 


00 










50, 


050 


00 


Betterment Releases 














198. 


00 












198 


00 


Excise Taxes 










1 


171, 


116. 


06 








1, 


171, 


116 


06 


Interest 












9, 


769. 


30 










9, 


769 


30 


Charges 












14, 


636. 


77 










14, 


636 


77 


Mark & Clear Fees 












9, 


000. 


00 










9, 


000 


00 


Water Dept. Collect 


ions 








4 


624, 


883. 


71 








4, 


624, 


883 


71 


Miscellaneous 












4, 


606. 


45 










4, 


606 


45 


TOTAL 


$10, 


505, 


224 


69 


$17 


687, 


901. 


29 


$228 


,859 


41 


$28, 


452, 


939 


19 



-17- 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION 



1994 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) $29,093,205.00 

Total Appropriations (Available) 2.016.304.00 

Total Deficit 75,068.00 

Special Education 2,038.00 

Energy Conservation 19,916.00 

County Retirement Assessment 1,454,814.00 

County Tax 43, 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 391, 

Air Pollution Districts 4, 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 3, 

Mosquito Control Project 22, 
Amount Certified by Collector & 

Treasurer for Tax Title 26,000.00 

Overlay of Current Year 600,922.00 

Cherry Sheet Offsets 32,213.00 

M.W.R.A 1.347. 656.00 



097.00 
101.00 
436.00 
752.00 
960.00 



$31,109,509.00 



S 4.023.973.00 
$35,133,482.00 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 
1993 Estimated Receipts from Local 

Aid and Agency Accounts 
Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Penalties and Interest on Taxes 
Payments in Lieu of Taxes 
Charges for Services - Sewer 
Other Charges for Services 
Fees 
Rentals 

Departmental Revenue - Library 
Departmental Revenue - Cemetery 
Other Department Revenue 
Licenses and Permits 
Special Assessments 
Fines and Forfeits 
Investment Income 
Overestimates 

Voted from Available Funds 



$ 4,511,230.00 
1,212,259.00 
200,000.00 
257,000.00 
1,945,273.00 
110,000.00 
40,000.00 
60,000.00 
10,000.00 
27,000.00 
168,000.00 
205,568.00 
60,000.00 
300,000.00 
60,000.00 
731.00 
2.016.304.00 



REAL ESTATE 
Residential 
Commercial 
Industrial 
Personal Property 



$998,857,852 @ $11.28 p/m 

127,470,600 @ 22.07 p/m 

424,489,900 @ 22.07 p/m 

22,711,037 @ 22.07 p/m 



$11.183.365.00 
S23. 950. 117.00 



$11,267, 117.00 
2,813,276.00 
9,368,492.00 
501.232.00 



S23. 950. 117.00 



-18- 



Town Clerk 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 46. General Laws as amended; 

Births - Actually recorded for 1993 
Marriage Intentions recorded for 1993 
Marriages recorded for 1993 
Deaths recorded for 1993 

Chapter 46. Section 15; 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and 
registered hospital medical officers applying therefor, blanks for the return 
of births as required by law. 

Chapter 207. Sections 19, 20 S 40; 

Chapter 718, Acts of 1979 made changes to Sections 19 and 20 along with 
Section 40 and, as stated before in each annual report, anyone intending to 
marry should inquire of this office to see if any changes have been made in 
the laws as they are changing constantly. 

Chapter 207. Section 45; 

This chapter provides for the availability of marriage records. 
Chapter 114, Sections 45. 46; 

Ninety-one burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent 
to the Board of Health for the year. Eight out-of-state deaths were reported 
and filed in this office. Twenty-five Wilmington veterans were buried in 
Wildwood Cemetery. 

Flammable Permits and Registrations; 

Flammable permits are 
issued by the Board of 
Selectmen through the Town 
Clerk. Notice is sent to 
the owner or occupant of 
land where the storage is 
located on or about March 
15th for renewal by April 
30th of each year. Failure 
to register on time or to 
comply with the Board's 
regulations may result in 
revocation of the permit 
after a public hearing. 
Eighty-one flammable 
permits were issued during 
the year. 



279 
122 
122 
172 




Town Clerk Kathleen M. Scanlon swears in newly appointed Fire Chief 
Daniel R. Stewart. Seated are: Town Manager Michael Caira, 
Selectman Mark T. Haldane and Selectman Gerald R. Duggan. 



-19- 



Permits S Recordings; 



Uniform Commercial Code Recordings 
Uniform Commercial Code Terminations 
Business Certificates and Withdrawals 
Federal Lien Recordings 
Federal Lien Releases 
Fish and Wildlife Licenses 
Pole Locations 
Dog Licenses 

Raffle and Bazaar Permits 
Other Services; 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. 
In this capacity, she has met with the Board of Registrars on a regular 
monthly meeting night, kept the minutes of same up to date, supervised the 
Annual Town Census by mail, kept the voting list up to date, and registered 
voters during the regular office hours of the Town Clerk. She also meets with 
the Board for special evening sessions to register voters and to certify 
nomination papers for candidates. 
Town Meetings & Elections 1993: 

Special Recall Election - February 2 Annual Town Meeting - April 24 

Annual Town Election - April 17 Special Town Meeting - December 6 



396 
95 
143 

15 
23 
509 
25 

1, 181 

9 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the Town By-laws, meetings of the 
Board of Registrars were held on the second Monday of each month for the 
registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 616 of the Acts 
of 1958, these meetings were open to the public and press, and were so posted 
in the Town Hall. 

The Board held registration sessions as mandated by Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 54, Section 64, Chapter 53, Sections 43 & 63 and Chapter 51, 
Sections 26, 28, 29 and 30, all in accordance with the Town Charter and 
Inhabitant By-laws Revised of the Town of Wilmington. 




This was a busy year. The Board also met 
many times for certification of signatures 
on nomination papers and assisted at town 
election and town meeting. 

The Town Clerk attended most of the Town 
Clerk conferences in order to keep up with 
the changing election and census laws. 

The calendar year of 1993 had a total of 
11,426 registered voters of our listed 
18,141 inhabitants. 

The Board of Registrars wants to thank all 
citizens of the town who returned their 
census forms in 1993 without delay. A 
true census is an asset to the town. 



Former Town Clerk Esther Russell arrives to cast her 
vote. 



-20- 



Constable 



During the year the following notices and 
warrants were posted by the Constable in 
each of the six (6) precincts: 

Special Recall Election - January 12, 1993 

Annual Town Election and Town Meeting 
March 24, 1993 

Special Town Meeting - November 12, 1993 




" Town Crier " and Historian Sid Dimond during a pro- 
gram at the Arts Center. 



Permanent Building Committee 



The Permanent Building Committee has been meeting to review the town's space 
needs with particular emphasis on the need to upgrade public safety facilities 
and the potential for combining the police and fire stations. 

Members of the Permanent Building Committee are Roger J. Lessard, Chairman, 
Mark T. Haldane, Alberto Angles, Jr. and Michael P. Dolan. 



> 




Wilmington Police Department, Adelaide Street. 



-21- 



Fire Department 



It is with great pleasure that I submit my first annual report as Fire Chief 
to the Town of Wilmington for the year 1993. 

The Fire Department currently has 34 members and considering the turnover of 
personnel during recent years, the following roster is provided. 

Departmental Roster 



Fire Chief 

Daniel R. Stewart 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Walter J. Sowyrda 

Lieutenants 

Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. John Brown, Jr. 

Edmund J. Corcoran, III Joseph T. McMahon 

Paul Welch 



Donald A. Ahern 
Robert J. Andersen 
Brian D. Anderson 
David J. Currier 
Gary J. Donovan 
David R. Feyler 
Linda S. Giles 
Kenneth P. Gray 



Firefighters 

Richard J. Hughes 
Daniel M. Hurley, Jr. 
Andrew W. Leverone 
John F. McDonough 
Richard T. McClellan, Jr. 
Terry McKenna 
Andrew W. McRobb 
Alfred W. Meuse 



Christopher J. Nee 
Stephen D. Robbins 
Robert E. Patrie, Jr. 
Gary P. Robichaud 
Daniel J. Stygles 
Robert W. Varey, Jr. 
Robert E. Vassallo, Jr. 
David P. Woods 
Robert J. Woods, Jr. 



Dispatchers 



Linda K. Abbott 



Christopher G. Pozzi 




Firefighters Linda S. Giles and Stephen D. Robbins accepting Community Service 
Award from Lieutenant Governor Paul CelluccI at State House ceremonies. 

-22- 



The department responded to a total of 2,246 calls during 1993. 



Residential Buildings 12 

Commercial Buildings 5 
Chimneys, fireplaces & 

Woodburning Stoves 4 

Vehicles 76 

Brush, Grass or Rubbish 113 



Out-of-town assistance 148 

Dumpsters 10 

Ambulance/Rescue 1 , 184 

Service Calls 428 

False Alarms 258 

Hazardous Materials 8 



Estimated value of property endangered was $8,781,900. 
loss was $239,740. 



Estimated property 



The following is a list of permits issued: 



Black Powder 
Blasting 

Class C Explosive 
Fire Alarm 
Flammable Liquid 
Oil Burner 



7 
36 
5 

133 
9 

174 



Propane 
Report 

Smoke Detector 
Tank 

Miscellaneous 
Sprinkler 



35 
48 
230 
100 
5 
4 



As required by law, inspections of all schools, public buildings, nursing 
homes, and flammable storage locations were completed by the Fire Prevention 
Bureau under the direction of Lt. Joseph T. McMahon. Other inspections are as 
follows : 



Construction Plans Review 105 
New Construction Residential 95 

New Construction Industrial 29 
Fire Inspections Industrial/ 

Commercial 205 



Underground Tank Removals 
Underground Tank 
Installations 
Oil Burners 
Propane 



174 
35 



Shift personnel inspected 230 residential properties for smoke detectors in 
compliance with MGL 148 Sec 26F. 

The Juvenile Firesetter's Program continued to provide successful results in 
this critical area. Teamwork with the Police Department and School Department 
in awareness, recognition and case management are key elements of the program. 
Six confidential cases were processed in 1993. 

All classrooms in Grades K-5 were visited by firefighters who discussed 
various safety issues. Firefighter Robert E. Patrie, Jr. instructed fire 
prevention at the Abundant Life School. 

The Wilmington Fire Department was 
recognized statewide for achievements in 
the area of fire prevention and safety 
outreach programs. On October 5th, at a 
State House ceremony, Lt. Governor Paul 
Cellucci presented the award to 
firefighters Linda S. Giles and Stephen D. 
Robbins who represented the Department. 

Operation Safe Prom was presented to high 
school students in May. This driving 
awareness program involved many of the 
town departments and role playing students 
to create a realistic accident scene on 
prom night. The impact of the progrcim was 
felt by all in attendance and no prom 
night accidents were reported. 



Fire Prevention Open House was celebrated 
in October with many demonstrations and 
exhibits for the public. Puppet shows. 




Keighia M. Ganier, Beverly Dalton and Sparky the Fire Dog 
enjoying Fire Department Open House, October 17, 1993. 



-23- 




highlights of the event. 



Residents taking part in the Fire Department Open House. 




Two automatic defibrillators were donated to the Department by the Winchester 
Family Medical Center and placed in service in October. Members of the 
Department should be commended for taking the additional courses required for 
defibrillator certification and for upgrading their EMT skill levels resulting 
in better service to the town. 

Lt. Edmund J. Corcoran, III graduated from the Massachusetts Firefighting 
Academy Hazardous Materials Technician Course and is currently a mennber of the 
District 6 Regional Haz Mat Team. 

Fire Alarm Superintendent Paul Welch reports the following for 1993. All 
circuits and master boxes were tested and repaired. One street box was 
reconditioned and installed at Woburn & Park Streets. The total number of 
fire alarm boxes on the system is 173 with 17 street boxes and 156 master 
boxes. Seven new boxes were added as follows: 



An underground fire alarm circuit was installed on Jonspin Road by private 
contractors at no cost to the town. Master boxes will be added sometime in 
1994. The construction of a new bridge on Fames Street necessitated the 
removal of overhead lines and installation of temporary service. Permanent 
circuits will be installed upon completion of the project. All labor and 
materials are being reimbursed by the Massachusetts Highway Department. A new 
intersection being constructed at Rt 12 5 and Andover Street also required the 
moving of overhead lines. The project is to be completed in 1994. 

Department goals include the continued upgrade of apparatus and equipment, 
improvement of training and operating procedures for all levels of the 
Department, expansion of community outreach programs such as CPR training, 
analysis of staffing levels, and work with appropriate departments to develop 
plans for a new fire station. 

In conclusion, I would like to thank the Town Manager and his staff. Assistant 
Town Manager, Department Heads and staff, the Board of Selectmen, and the many 
organizations for their assistance during the past year. A very special thank 
you to the members of the Wilmington Fire Department for your support, 
participation, and enthusiasm in providing a well rounded and highly 
professional level of public safety service to the Town of Wilmington. 



1233 

3315 

3342 

431 

5463 

6521 



Ristuccia Expo Center, 190 Main Street 
Pacific Packaging, 24 Industrial Way 
Cellular One, 310 Lowell Street 
Congregational Church, 220 Middlesex Ave 
Admiral Roofing, Lopez Road 
Sandra Equipment, 222 Andover Street 



-24- 



Police Department 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby 
respectfully submit the annual report on the activities of the Wilmington 
Police Department for the year 1993. 

The enclosed statistical report represents the total for all crimes, 
complaints and incidents reported during the year 1993; and, for the most 
part, the corresponding enforcement efforts of the Wilmington Police 
Department. During 1993, the total number of complaints and incidents 
reported to the Police Department decreased slightly from 10,270 in 1992 to 
10,263 during 1993. For the most part, these decreases were within the 
various minor crime categories and service related incidents. However, a 
number of the serious crime categories increased significantly during 1993. 
In February 1993 Wilmington experienced its first homicide for the 1990 's. It 
was a drug related killing. Breaking and entering into homes and buildings 
increased by 45%, from 88 incidents in 1992 to 128 during 1993. Armed 
robberies increased from zero during 1992 to 6 during 1993. Totals for 
assaults and batteries increased by 34, from 42 in 1992 to 76 in 1993. Motor 
vehicles stolen in Wilmington increased by 

Motor vehicle accidents and traffic 
congestion continue to be serious 
community problems. During 1993 the 
Police Department experienced a 5.3% 
increase in the motor vehicle accident 
rate. In 1993 motor vehicle accidents 
increased by 34 accidents from 642 
accidents in 1992 to 676 during 1993. 
This slight increase is viewed as a 
leveling off from the significant decrease 
over the past several years and does not 
appear to be a trend. The accident rate 
for 1993 is still 720 accidents less than 
the 1985 high of 1,396. 

The Police Department has, for several 
years, placed a high priority on the 
enforcement of motor vehicle violations; 
however, during 1993 motor vehicle 
violations cited decreased by 32%. The 
primary reason for this decrease is the 
reduction in staff which the department 
has incurred over the past few years. 
While the Traffic Unit has not been 
eliminated, it has been reduced from four 
to two officers and their effectiveness is 
severely curtailed by other assignments 
mandated by reduced staffing in the patrol 
force. During 1992 the department cited 2,569 motor vehicle violations. This 
represents a decrease of 23% from the violations cited during 1992. The 
following are the totals for some of the major areas of concern: speeding 
violations 902; operators' license violations 190; unregistered and uninsured 
99; and, miscellaneous violations 1,203. Arrests for operating a motor 
vehicle under the influence of alcohol were decreased by 9 arrests from 61 in 
1992 to 52 in 1993. 

Arrests for crimes other than motor vehicle offenses during 1993 totaled 548. 
During 1993 the Police Department continued to place a high priority on 
alcohol and drug related offenses. As a result, arrests for lic[uor law 
violations totaled 142 and there was a total of 19 narcotics arrests during 
1993. In addition to motor vehicle and other criminal arrests, the department 
placed a total of 128 persons under protective custody. A total of 846 
persons were taken into custody by the Police Department during 1993. As a 
result of the enforcement efforts of the department, the fine monies returned 
to the Town of Wilmington from the Woburn District Court during 1993 totaled 
$62,375; and the motor vehicle fine monies returned to the town from the 
Registry of Motor Vehicles totaled $127,050. 



35% from 57 in 1992 to 77 in 1993. 




Police and Fire personnel respond to motor vehicle accident 
on Burlington Avenue. 



-25- 



In May 1993, the Police Department submitted a grant application for the 
initial stage of community policing for the Town of Wilmington. In July 1993, 
the department received notification from the Massachusetts Committee on 
Criminal Justice advising that our application had been approved in the amount 
of $75,000. The department's primary objective will be to develop a 
partnership with the community to identify public safety and enforcement 
problems in the neighborhoods and to establish effective methods of achieving 
police and community goals. The focus in dealing with those problems will be 
both enforcement and prevention based. While various concepts of community 
policing are being implemented in larger cities, for the most part, the 
concepts have not been adapted for use in towns such as Wilmington. The 
geographic distribution of the residents and department staffing do not allow 
for a traditional community policing progrsun. The department has for several 
years considered the implementation of a modified community policing 
initiative. The significant turnover of department personnel and the large 
number of residents who have moved to Wilmington from other areas has resulted 
in a great number of residents who have no personal contacts with the Police 
Department. The most important part of this program is to establish new lines 
of communication in the neighborhoods. The Police Department needs the 
involvement of our citizens to be informed of the problems in the community 
and to respond to them effectively. 

The department makes note of personnel changes during 1993. During 1993 
Sergeant Robert H. Spencer was promoted to Lieutenant, Patrolman J. 
Christopher Neville was promoted to Sergeant and Patrolman Brian P. Tully was 
appointed as a full-time officer. Patrolman James A. Hanlon took a leave of 
absence and is now a Massachusetts State Trooper. Considering the tremendous 
turnover in the Police Department's personnel during the past few years, the 
following Departmental Roster is being provided. 



Departmental Roster 

Chief of Police 

Bobby N. Stewart 

Deputy Chief 

Bernard P. Nally 



Operations Division Commander 

Lt. Robert C. LaRivee 



Administrative Division Commander 
Lt. Robert H. Spencer, Jr. 



James J. Rooney 
William M. Jepson 



Sergeants 

David M. McCue 
Willicun E. Gable 



Joseph F. Duffy 
J. Christopher Neville 



Patrolmen 



Robert E. Shelley 
Arthur V. Lynch, Jr. 
Michael J. McKenna 
Michael A. Celata, Jr. 
Joseph C. Waterhouse 
Lawrence L. Redding 
Patrick J. King 
Francis D. Hancock 
James M. Peterson 
Steven R. LaRivee 



Stephen F. Mauriello 
James R. White 
Jon C. Shepard 
Robert V. Richter 
Thomas A. Miller 
Charles R. Fiore, Jr. 
Paul L. Chalifour 
Paul W. Jepson 
David L. Axelrod 
Harold B. Hubby, Jr. 



Joseph F. Harris, Jr. 
Joseph A. Desmond 
Michael R. Begonis 
Chester A. Bruce, III 
David A. Sugrue 
Louis Martignetti 
Alan J. Reece 
John M. Bossi, Jr. 
Brian P. Tully 



In closing this report, I want to thank the Town Manager, the Board of 
Selectmen, all other Boards and Committees and, all Department Heads and their 
workers for their support and cooperation during 1993. 

A special note of thanks to the Staff and Members of the Wilmington 
Police Department, for without their support and continuing efforts 
none of our accomplishments could have been realized. 



-26- 



Wilmington Police Department Statistics 1993 



ARRESTS ; 

Arson 2 

Assault Sc Battery 29 

Breaking & Entering 12 

Disorderly Conduct 8 

Gambling 1 

Larceny 16 

Larceny Motor Vehicle 11 

Liquor Laws 142 

Malicious Damage 11 

Narcotics 19 

Non/Support 1 

Rape 4 

Receiving Stolen Prop. 5 

Robbery 

Runaway 20 

Sex Offenses 5 

Juvenile 32 

Other 230 



MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS ; 

Using Without Authority 
License Violations 
Endangering 

Leave Scene Prop. Damage 
Operating Under Influence 
Unregistered/Uninsured 
Speed 

Truck Violations 
Other 

TOTAL VIOLATIONS: 

Citations Issued ; 

Warnings 
Complaints 
Non-Criminal 
Arrests 



1 

190 
12 
6 
52 
99 
902 
104 
1.203 

2,569 



1,039 
103 
775 
118 



TOTAL: 



548 



TOTAL CITATIONS: 



2,035 



PROTECTIVE CUSTODY ; 

Ages : 

11/12 

13/14 

15 

16 

17 

TOTAL UNDER 18: 



18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 

25/29 
30/34 
35/39 
40/44 
45/49 
50/54 
55/59 
60 & over 



20 



7 

3 
4 

3 
3 
3 
5 
23 
18 
9 
12 
14 
1 
2 
1 



CRIMES REPORTED ; 

Arson & Bombing (threats) 

Assault & Battery; 

Firearm 
Knife 

Other Weapon 
Aggravated-Hands, etc. 
Simple Assault 

TOTAL ASSAULTS; 

BREAKING & ENTERING : 

By Force 
No Force 
Attempted B&E 

TOTAL B&E: 

ROBBERY ; 

Firearm 
Other Weapon 
Strong Arm 

TOTAL ROBBERIES: 



47 



1 
4 
11 
37 
23 

76 



97 
9 

_22 
128 



TOTAL OVER 18: 



108 



TOTAL PROTECTIVE 
CUSTODY: 128 



-27- 



SEX CRIMES : 



INCIDENTS REPORTED ; 



Rape 6 

Indecent Exposure 7 

Indecent A&B 

Other 18 

TOTAL SEX CRIMES: 31 

LARCENIES : 

Pocket Picking 

Purse Snatching 3 

Shoplifting 14 

From Motor Vehicles 70 

M/V Parts & Access. 32 

Bikes 33 

From Buildings 57 

From Coin Machines 3 
Larceny by check 

(fraud) 51 

Other 52 

TOTAL LARCENIES: 315 



MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN : 

Autos 62 

Trucks & Buses 9 

Other Vehicles 6 

TOTAL M/V THEFT: 77 



Alarms Responded to 1,620 

Disturbances 2,851 

Domestic Problems 234 

Emergencies Responded to 438 

Fires Responded to 72 

Juvenile Complaints 442 

Missing Persons Returned 23 
Missing Persons/Still 

Missing 1 

Prowlers Reported 73 

Miscellaneous Complaints 3,096 

M/V Accidents 676 

Cruisers Dispatched 7,595 

Suicides & Attempts 8 

Sudden Deaths 8 

OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS : 

Restraining Orders Served 127 

Parking Tickets Issued 140 

Firearm I.D. Issued 131 

License to Carry Issued 364 

Dealer Permits Issued 2 
Reports to Ins. Co. and 

Attorneys 583 




RECOVERED MOTOR VEHICLES ; 

Stolen Wilmington 
Recovered Wilmington 15 

Stolen Wilmington 
Recovered Out of Town 53 

Stolen Out of Town 
Recovered Wilmington 42 



110 




Principal Richard Gorham, Police Chief Bobby N. Stewart and Officer James White presenting 
awards during DARE graduation ceremonies at the Shawsheen School. 

-28- 



Animal Control Officer 



Number of Complaints 
Number of Trips 
Total Working Hours 
Number of Animals Picked-Up 
Number of Animals Returned to Owners 
Number of Animals Adopted 
Number of Animals Picked-Up Dead 
Number of Quarantines 
Number of Animals Euthanized 
(this number reflects sick or 
injured wildlife also) 
Barn Inspections 
Number of Dogs Licensed 
Number of Citations Issued 
Citations Issued 
Reimbursement from County 



Emergency Management 



The Wilmington Emergency Management Agency (WEMA) is housed in the basement of 
the old Town Hall, located at 219 Middlesex Avenue, where we share a most 
cordial co-existence with the Wilmington Council of Arts. WEMA's goal, in 
fact its very existence, is geared to being of service to the citizens of 
Wilmington. 

These services cover a wide spectrum of needs from the furnishing of personnel 
and mobile units equipped with radio, telephone, and packet (short-wave 
version of teletype), which have been utilized in the past to assist the 
annual walk-a-thon committee, to providing limited supplies and shelter 
capabilities, as well as an underwater dive tecim for recovery work. The 
agency continues to have a very active radio communications group under the 
supervision of Herb Nickerson. The base station for our agency is at the 
N.Y.N.E.X. tower site located at the junction of Rt . 129 and Rt . 38. 
Wilmington shares the net control with the Town of Burlington in the handling 
and relaying of emergency communications between seventeen (17) other sister 
communities and Area-1 headquarters in Tewksbury. Wilmington has the 
distinction of being the back-up for Area-1. In the event Area-1 is unable to 
carry out their communications role, Wilmington will assume the function as 
emergency communications liaison between the 85 communities that comprise 
Area-1 and the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency located in 
Freuningham, MA. 

The dive team continues to be a viable element of our agency largely through 
the efforts of Mike Begonis, Bill Gable and Bob LaRivee. At present there is 
equipment for three divers. 

The Wilmington Emergency Management Agency extends its thanks and appreciation 
to all who have supported its growth and development. Thank you for your many 
hours of volunteer work, without which we could not function. 




-29- 



Inspector of Buildings 



1991 1992 

Valuation No. 



Dwellings (Single Family) 151 $ 24,010,000 145 S 23,069,000 114 

Residential Garages 14 207.000 19 293,300 15 
Additions & Alterations 

Residential 283 1-954.532 291 1.897,310 Ul 



Wood Burning Stoves 



TURNED OVER TO TREASURER 

Building Permits 
Wiring Permits 
Gas Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Cert, of Inspection 
Copies 

Industrial Elec. Permits 



No. 




Valuation 


No. 


1 C 1 


c 




145 


1 A 






19 


283 
448 




1 954 532 


291 


e 


26, 171, 532 


455 


1 




471 700 





1 




957*660 


3 


73 




3,327,490 


86 


32 




159,288 


27 






27 310 


22 


Q 










Q 














44 377 


30 


15 




16 460 


16 


173 


$ 
$ 


5,004,285 
31,175,817 


184 


4 




191,000 


3 


12 




43,500 


19 













3 




1,606,000 


1 


1 




1 





20 


$ 


1,840,050 


23 


641 

) 


$ 


33,015,867 


662 



$ 25,259,610 442 $ 21,919,244 



1 200,000 

1,714,500 



Industrial Buildings 
Commercial Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 

(Non-residential) 73 3'??Z'f!? 

Swimming Pools 
Signs 

Public Buildings 
Multi Family Dwellings 

Sheds and Barns 28 44,377 30 55,114 33 42,335 



164,399 31 113,031 

86,925 21 45,680 







13.435 17 16.929 



$ 8,846,451 177 $ 5,602,238 
$ 34,106,061 S 27,521,482 



Renewals 4 191,000 3 70,000 3 150,000 

Demolitions 12 43,500 19 577,302 18 143,750 

Fire Damage 

Foundations 3 1,606,000 1 1,000 

Temporary Trailers 1 1 Q 

648,302 21 S 293,750 



641 


$ 


85, 


877. 


00 


662 


$ 


107, 


022, 


.92 


640 


$ 


87, 


075, 


.75 


532 




22, 


220. 


50 


559 




31, 


295, 


.00 


525 




28, 


760, 


.00 


172 




5, 


293. 


00 


189 




5, 


872, 


.00 


162 




5, 


915, 


.00 


233 




8, 


206. 


50 


292 




11, 


021, 


.00 


254 




10, 


238, 


.00 


22 




1, 


050. 


00 


27 




1, 


085, 


.00 


26 




1, 


275, 
132, 


.00 
.07 


23 




3, 


450. 


00 


22 




3, 


300, 


.00 


24 




3, 


600, 


.00 


1,623 


$ 


90, 


896. 


50 1, 


,750 


$ 


159, 


595, 


.92 


1,631 


$ 


136, 


863, 


.75 



Planning & Conservation Department 



Organization and Function 

Fiscal Year 1994 is the second year of operation for the consolidated Planning 
& Conservation Department. The department has continued to provide a high 
level of service to the community in areas of planning, conservation and other 
community development activities such as housing and transportation. 

Departmental goals are: 

Goal 1: To provide technical assistance to the Planning Board through 

review of development plans, including coordination with 
developers and other departments; and through providing 
information on state planning initiatives and requirements. 

Goal 2: To provide technical assistance to the Conservation Commission in 

administration and enforcement of the State Wetlands Protection 
Act. 



-30- 



Goal 3: 



To provide assistance and information to residents. 



Goal 4: 



To revise the zoning bylaws to enhance the character of the town, 
while encouraging appropriate economic development. 



Goal 5: 



To revise the subdivision rules and regulations to improve the 
development review process and the quality of development. 



Goal 6 



To encourage the donation of land for conservation purposes. 



Goal 7 



To develop local wetland protection by-laws. 



Goal 8 



To promote environmental awareness and education. 



Goal 9 



To provide technical assistance to the Housing Partnership through 
initiation and implementation of affordable housing efforts, 
including town-owned land development, monitoring of on-going 
developments and review of local initiative projects sponsored by 
developers. 



Goal 10: 



To implement special planning/community development projects, 
including development and oversight of grant programs. 



Goal 11: 



To represent the Town of Wilmington on planning issues at various 
state and regional forums. 



The Planning & Conservation Department is responsible for oversight of other 
town projects and activities, including the Massachusetts Small Cities 
Program, the Strategic Planning Grant Program and disposition of town-owned 
land. The Director is also designated as the Transportation Improvement 
Project (TIP) Coordinator to serve as liaison with the state regarding 
Wilmington transportation priorities. 

The Planning & Conservation Director is Lynn Goonin Duncan. Anne Gagnon 
serves as Environmental Specialist and provides technical assistance to the 
Conservation Commission. Secretarial support is provided by Senior Clerk 
Linda Simoneau and part-time Conservation Secretary Linda Boutoures who joined 
the department in August 1993. 

Grant Programs 

During 1993 the Small Cities Program was initiated. The program is funded 
through the Executive Office of Communities and Development with federal 
Community Development Block Grant funds. Since the program became fully 
staffed in the spring, much has been achieved. The staff worked diligently to 
implement the several diverse components of the grant. The staff consists of 
a full-time Director, Glenn Garber; full-time Secretary, Joanna Clayton; part- 
time Job Developer, Cathy Beyer; and part-time Housing Rehabilitation 
Specialist, Dan Paret. 

Some of the key achievements of the prograun by the end of 1993 were as 
follows : 

o Housing Rehabilitation: Twenty-three homes were under construction, 

primarily in the Silver Lake target area; 5 of which were substantially 
complete. These cases represent housing improvement expenditures of 
$195,643, 95% of which were paid for by the Small Cities Progreun. It 
appears likely that the program goal of 25 will be exceeded in 1994, 
bringing deficient houses up to building and sanitation code standards 
and improving the quality of life for many Wilmington households. 

o Employment Assistance: Approximately 120 unemployed residents had 

benefited from the varied services offered by year's end. Among the 
types of assistance available were weekly employment seminars with a 
variety of helpful guest speakers; individual job counseling; creation 
of a Job Resource Center at the public library as a job search facility 
for the participants; outreach to hundreds of area employers, in part to 
obtain current employment listings; and related forms of help. The 
component also offered two important forms of direct grant assistance - 



-31- 



employment training grants and both group and individual mental health 
support through Wilmington Family Counseling Services. By the end of 
the year nine persons had identified new career paths and ten persons 
had participated in the counseling sessions. 

Other activities include construction of affordable accessory rental 
units in existing single family dwellings, and provision of down payment 
and closing cost assistance for first time homebuyers. Applications for 
the three accessory apartments to be created were received at year's 
end. Through the Homebuyers Program the first mortgage closing occurred 
in late December, 1993, assisting a Wilmington family to purchase their 
first home. 




Town Center with Improvements (View from near Middlesex Avenue looking towards Route 62 Intersection). 




-32- 



other achievements included development of a townwide action plan called the 
Community Action Statement. 

The Route 38 Corridor Redevelopment Study was funded by the state through the 
Strategic Planning Program and the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority. The 
goal was to increase the economic vitality and viability of the town center 
while enhancing its image and character. The consultant firm David Dixon/ 
Goody Clancy was hired in early 1993 to work closely with the Strategic 
Planning Task Force. The task force was appointed by the Town Manager to 
oversee the study and included representatives of the Board of Selectmen, 
Planning Board, Wilmington Redevelopment Authority, Chounber of Commerce and 
local businesses/property owners. 

Major findings of the study include: 

1. The Route 38 corridor primarily presents opportunities for retail and 
other services expansion. 

2. Planning for the corridor needs to strike a balance between its role as 
a major transportation corridor and as the town's major commercial 
center. 

3. Revision of the current zoning is needed to enhance commercial vitality 
and improve the corridor's image and identity. 

4. A special new zoning district "Central Business District" should be 
designed to meet the unique needs of the town center. 

5. Improvements to the MBTA commuter rail station are essential. 

6. The town should establish a Town Center Committee to guide improvement 
efforts in this area. 

7. Improved design and landscaping criteria should be incorporated in 
zoning to create a town center that will contribute positively to the 
identity of the town as a whole. 

8. All new commercial projects along Route 38 should incorporate extensive 
tree planting to reflect the town's natural rural landscape. 

9. If efforts to secure a manufacturing reuse of the Sweetheart Cup 
facility are not successful, alternative mixed use approaches should be 
considered. 

A Town Center Committee has been established based on invitation to all town 
center businesses and property owners. It is anticipated that zoning changes 
will be recommended for action at the Annual Town Meeting. 



PLANNING BOARD 

New development activity continued to increase in 1993 as twenty-five (25) 
subdivision plans were submitted representing a total of 170 lots, in 
comparison with ten (10) new subdivisions in 1992. There was significant 
subdivision construction activity, including Whitefield Elm Village, Andover 
Heights, Treasure Hill, Apache Way, Chestnut Estates II, Mill Road Estates and 
Allgrove Estates II. The increase in activity was evidenced by the increase 
in filing fees, $23,493.08 in contrast to $7,334.00 in 1992. The filing fees 
are turned over to the General Fund Account. 

The Planning Board members are appointed by the Town Manager for five year 
terms. Planning Board members serving throughout 1993 were Richard Longo, 
Carole Hamilton, Austin Rounds, William Hooper, Jr. and James Diorio. William 
Hooper also serves as the representative to the Board of Appeals. Carole 
Hcunilton and Richard Longo serve on the Strategic Planning Task Force/Town 
Center Committee. 



-33- 



Subdivision Control 

Under the authority vested in the Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington by 
M.G.L. Chapter 41, Section 81-Q, the Board reviewed and took action on the 
following subdivision plans: 



Subdivision 

Wilmington Highland Estates 

Denault Drive 

Lot 43 Avery Street 

Lot 68 Randolph Road 

Lot 41 Rhode Island Road 

Oqunquit Road 

Winston Avenue (Preliminary) 
Cherokee Estates 
Federal Street (Preliminary) 
Dewey Avenue 

Treasure Hill Road (Modification) 

Miller Road 

Madison Road 

Morton Road 

Plymouth Avenue 

Flynn Village 

Ogunquit Road 

Stonehedge Estates (Preliminary) 
Navajo Estates 
Lincoln Avenue 
Pembroke Street 

White Pines Crossing (Preliminary) 
Andover Heights II (Modification) 
Auburn Avenue 
Blanchard Road 
Stonehedge Estates 

Avon Street Extension (Preliminary) 
Marion Estates 
Medford Avenue 
Gushing 



Number 








of Lots 


Action 


7 


Approved with 


condit ions 


1 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


1 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


1 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


1 


Denied 






1 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


1 


Withdrawn 




10 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


7 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


1 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


+ 1 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


4 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


1 


Approved 


with 


condit ions 


1 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


2 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


7 


Approved 


with 


condit ions 


2 


Approved 


with 


condit ions 


30 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


7 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


3 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


2 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


36 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


+ 3 


Approved 


with 


conditions 


1 


Pending 






2 


Pending 






30 


Pending 






3 


Pending 






21 


Pending 






2 


Pending 






2 


Pending 







Of the twenty-nine (29) "Approval Not Required" (ANR) plans that were 
submitted, the Planning Board determined that twenty-four (24) plans did not 
require approval under the Subdivision Control Law and were endorsed; three 
(3) plans were denied as they were determined to constitute subdivisions; one 
(1) was withdrawn and one (1) is pending. 

Site Plan Review 

The Board reviewed four (4) applications for Site Plan Approval and 
recommended revisions and conditions to the Town Engineer as appropriate. 

Zoning 



In accordance with M.G.L. ch. 40A, the Planning Board held required statutory 
public hearings on proposed amendments to the Zoning Bylaw and Map and 
submitted formal reports and recommendations to Town Meeting voters. Those 
recommendations are made part of the report of the Town Meetings beginning on 
page 130. 



-34- 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



The Conservation Commission is a seven member volunteer board which 
administers and enforces the state Wetlands Protection Act and its 
regulations. Members who served throughout the year include Chairman Gary 
Mercer, William Gately, Lynne Guzinski, William MacKinnon, and John White, Jr. 
James Morris and Barbara Sullivan were appointed to the Commission in 1993. 

The Commission continued to work toward increasing the protection of 
environmentally sensitive land through acceptance of land donations and 
transfers. Three acres were acquired in 1993. One two-acre parcel of town- 
owned land on Phillips Avenue adjacent to Lubbers Brook was transferred to the 
Commission by vote of the 1993 Annual Town Meeting. In addition, a .8 acre 
parcel of land which abuts the Ipswich River on Woburn Street was donated by 
Mrs. Saver ina D'Urso. Mr. Peter DeGennaro donated two small parcels on 
Cambridge Avenue and Somerville Avenue. Many new parcels are currently in the 
process of being donated, including four parcels from Mrs. Amelia Booth in the 
Mather/Walnut Street area totalling approximately one acre; a two acre parcel 
on Harding Street from Mr. DeGennaro; and five parcels in the Buckingham Road 
area, two parcels off Newbern Avenue and one parcel abutting Maple Meadow 
Brook off Fulton Road from Mr. Benevento totalling approximately 2.5 acres. 

The Commission reviewed 100 new applications in 1993 and held almost 200 
public hearings/meetings to review those projects. The average number of 
annual public hearings/meetings in the previous five years was only 95. The 
Commission also reviewed larger projects in 1993, including a number of 
subdivisions as well as the 1-93 gasoline spill remediation plan, which is 
expected to be implemented in 1994. 

The Conservation Commission drafted a wetland bylaw with the intent of 
submitting a warrant article for the Annual Town Meeting and will draft 
regulations in early 1994. Both of these documents will continue to be 
revised subsequent to public review. 

Environmental Specialist Anne Gagnon continues to be available to answer 
questions regarding wetlands and filing requirements. 

Statistical Data 

Filing Fees Collected 
Notices of Intent Filed 

Requests for Determinations of Applicability 
Public Hearings/Meetings Held 

(including continuances) 
Extension Permits Requested/Issued/Denied 
Enforcement Orders Issued 
Violation Notices Issued 
Complaints Investigated 

Certificates of Compliance Requested/ Issued 
Decisions Appealed/Withdrawn 
Orders of Conditions/Determinations Pending 
Order of Conditions Issued/Denied/Withdrawn 
Site Inspections Conducted (Staff) 
Emergency Certifications Issued 
By-law Subcommittee Meetings Held 
Request for Insignificant Change/Approved 
Negative Determinations with Conditions/Positive/ 
Withdrawn 

Request for Amendments/Issued/Denied 



$9,961.00 
35 
65 

191 

5/4/2 
6 

32 

43 
41/36 

1/1 
10/1 
27/1/1 
528 
6 
5 

15/14 

56/5/4 
4/4/1 



Notices of Intent 
DEP 

FILE # APPLICANT LOCATION (MAP /PARCEL) DECISION 

344-419 Olin Corp. Jewel Drive & Fames Street Order Issued 

(24/208B, 208 and 37/10) Appealed 



-35- 



APPLICANT 



LOCATION f MAP /PARCELS 



DECISION 



344-420 
344-421 
344-418 



344-417 
344-423 
344-422 
344-424 

344-426 

344-425 



344-428 
344-427 



344-430 
344-431 



344-429 
344-432 



344-433 
344-434 



344-435 



344-436 



344-437 

344-439 
344-438 
344-440 

344-451 
344-441 
344-442 

344-448 
344-443 
344-444 



344-445 

344-446 

344-447 

344-449 
344-450 



Gulf Oil 

Co. 
Ray & Dave 
Needham 

John Sons Realty 
Trust, John 
Ella 

Richard Cole 
Hugh Callahan 
Heffron Asphalt 
Val-Lyn 

Construction 
Wilmington Water 

and Sewer Dept. 
Northeastern Dev. 

Corp. 

Whitefield Elm 
Realty Trust 

Whitefield Elm 
Realty Trust 

Stanley Stedman 

Northeastern Dev. 
Corp. 

Ametek Aerospace 

Products 
Albert & Eileen 

Clark 
Lawrence Foley 
Gary Ruping, 

Woodhill Realty 

Trust 
Gary Ruping, 

Woodhill Realty 

Trust 
Gary Ruping, 

Woodhill Realty 

Trust 
Northeastern Dev. 

Corp. 
Colonial Gas Co. 
Harvey Berturnay 
Universe 

Construction 
Mildred O'Keefe 
Joseph Cataldo 
Doherty & Lopez 

Corp. 
Kevin Field 
Michael McCoy 
Gary Ruping, 

Woodhill Realty 

Trust 
Gary Ruping, 

Woodhill Realty 

Trust 
Gary Ruping, 

Woodhill Realty 

Trust 
Gary Ruping, 

Woodhill Realty 

Trust 
International 

Paper Co. 
Hugh Callahan 



Route 1-93 Project (75/15 & 18) 

8 King Street (54/69) 

382 Middlesex Avenue (89/13B) 

Marion Street (5/1) 
123 Glen Road (54, Part of 8D) 
Salem Street (Rl/24, 24A) 

Bridge Lane (32/125) 

156 Lake Street (35/lA) 

Woburn Street (Cherokee Estates) 
(85/7C) 

Cottonwood Circle (R4/17A) 

Cottonwood Circle (R4/19A) 
3 Church Street (41/llOA) 

364 Chestnut Street (Navajo Estates) 
(13/3) 

50 Fordham Road (99/1) & (91/131) 

Auburn Avenue (32/100) 
Kilmarnock Street (74/ Part of 3) 

Lot 3 Fernbanks Road (15/103) 

Lot 4 Fernbanks Road (15/104) 

Lot 5 Fernbanks Road (15/105) 

46 Shawsheen Avenue (32/Part of 3) 
Concord & Federal Street 
Palmer Way (79/1118) 

Lot 2 Avon Street (9, 34 & 35) 
Flynn Way (61/8) (Lots 2, 3 & 6) 
Lot 2 Hardin Road (20/18) 
Burlington Avenue (17/18) 
(Stonehedge Estates) 
30 Miller Road (54/2 & 4) 
110 Lowell Street (49/57D) 



Lot 6R Fernbanks Road (15/106) 
Lot 7 Fernbanks Road (15/107) 
Lot 8R Fernbanks Road (15/108) 

Lot lOR Fernbanks Road (15/110) 

Butters Row & Route 38 
134 Nichols Street 



Order Issued 

Order Issued 

Order Issued 

Order Issued 
Order Issued 
Order Issued 

Order Issued 

Order Issued 

Order Issued 

Order Issued 

Order Issued 
Order Issued 

I 

Order Issued 

Order Issued 

Pending 
Order Issued 

Order Issued 

Order Issued 

Order Issued 

Order Issued 
Order Issued 
Denial 

Order Issued 
Order Issued 
Pending 
Pending 

Withdrawn 
Pending 

Pending 

Pending 

Pending 



Pending 

Pending 
Pending 



-36- 



Amendments to Orders of Condition Recmeated 



DEP 
FILE # 



APPLICANT 



344-277 B. MacDonald 

344-399 P. DeGennaro 

344-382 James Tighe 

344-419 Olin Corp. 



LOCATION (MAP /PARCELS DECISION 

Mill Road Estates (15/101-110) Approved 

Kansas Road (35/136) Approved 

4 St. Paul Street (54/8D) Denied 
Jewel Drive & Eames Street 

(24/208, 208B & 37/10) Approved 



Determinations of Applicability Recmested 



APPLICANT 


LOCATION 


MAP /PARCEL 




Frances Bradley 


20 North Street 


88/3 




Ruth Tkachuk 


124 Pond Street 


34/137 




Anthony & Donna DeLuca 


347 Salem Street 


96/211 




Denise St Mark Peterson 


27 Towpath Drive 


29/38 




Craig Musicant 


149R Chestnut Street 


15/15B 




Robert DiPillo 


66 Forest Street 


7/2 




Robert Scarano 


Salem Street 


95/17J St A 




Sharon Kelley 


145 Chestnut Street 


15/16A 




Williaun & Jayne Leder 


Magazine Street 


44/32 




Willard Swan 


246 Middlesex Avenue 


65/5B 




Steve & Jean Diorio 


159R Lake Street 


35/23K 




Pete Fitzpatrick 


63 Andover Street 


103/121-124 


Hugh Callahan 


123 Glen Road 


54/8D 




Leonard Colometo 


4 Somerville Avenue 


9/Part of ; 


8C 


Ralph Newhouse 


Allgrove Lane 


86/Part of 


lOJ Lot 14 


Carl Crupi 


Shawsheen Avenue 


23/Part of 


6 Lot 6B 


Shawn Anderson 


Cunningham Street St 








Everett Avenue 


69/122 




Donald Jones 


23 Adams Street 


51/47 




Thomas Alberty 


304 Burlington Ave. 


6/87E 




Ralph Newhouse 


Allgrove Lane 


86/Part of 


lOJ Lots 1! 


and 16 




Mr. St Mrs. Zarella 


55 Garden Avenue 


54/25 




Michael Buzzotta 


One Rhode Island Rd. 


35/71 




Kenneth F. DiRaf f ael/Kenwood 


Andover Heights Sub. 


R3/Part of 


3, 19, 21, 


Development Corp. 


33 and 34 




Joan Jack 


7 Lawrence Court 


66/65 




Patty Konieczka 


z/o Salem street 


90/3C 




Paul Butt 


8 Earles Row 


96/204 Lot 


4 


Mark Lopez 


z/4 Middlesex Ave. 


74/Part of 


4 


Scott MacLeod 


11 Cushing Drive 


21/8A 




Gary Balistrieri 


16 Railroad Avenue 


43/25B 




Paul Smith & Cynthia Presz 


2 5 Douglas Avenue 


79/117 




Ann Whitney Schwartz 


343 Salem Street 


97/30 




Mark Lopez 


Avon Street 


9/Part of 


34 & 35 


Mark Lopez 


Suncrest Avenue St 






Hilltop Road 


57/11 




Paul O'Keefe 


64 Agostino Drive 


53/7A 




Doughtery St Lopez 


Burlington Avenue 


17/18 




David Hill 


80 Nichols Avenue 


35/34K 




Earl L'Esperance 


11 Great Neck Drive 


86/8E 




Leroy P. Reynolds 


20 Oxbow Drive 


47/32 




Massachusetts Highway 




From Woburn town line 


Department 


1-93 Repaving 


to Route 


62 


Elizabeth Harriman & Gary Mercer 


39 Birchwood Road 


81/18 




Barry Jensen 


268 Burlington Ave. 


6/55 




Massachusetts Highway 


Main Street 


Tewksbury to 600' 


Department 


(Route 38) 


north of : 


Route 62 


Wilmington Housing Authority 


Rear 16 Deming Way 


30/1 




Northeastern Development Corp. 


Broad Street 


68/1 St 2 




New England Telephone 


Lowell Street 


58/2 




Northeastern Development Corp. 


46 Shawsheen Ave. 


32/Part of 


3 Lot 3A 



-37- 



APPLICANT 



LOCATION 



MAP /PARCEL 



Mark Lopez 
Ben Osgood 
Mark Lopez 



Arthur Kanavos 

Whitefield Elm Realty Trust 

Barbara Sullivan 

Northeastern Development Corp. 

Thomas Realty Trust 



Charles Fiore 
Mildred O'Keefe 



Northeastern Development Corp. 

Dennis Sullivan 

Carl Crupi 

Mark Lopez 

Domenic Tutela 

Daniel Fonzi 



Nassau Avenue 
9 Philips Avenue 
Pembroke Street 
Ogunquit Road 
310 Lowell Street 
3 Cottonwood Circle 
Blueberry Lane 
One Progress Way 
11 Blueberry Lane 
27 Gunderson Road 
Agostino Drive 
Buckingham Street 



Concord Street 
Flynn Way 
83 Butters Row 
Hopkins Street 
Burlington Avenue 

Stonehedge Estates 
Concord Street 
110 Lowell Street 
337 Ballardvale St. 



32/Part of 3 Lot 3B 
44/84 

16/25 Lots 16 2 
50/73 Lots 73B 
72/2 

R4/10,12 & 14 

R4/18A, 43, 34 & 35 

56/llOA 

R4/21 

94/46 

53/5A & 5C 

9/67D & 10/8, 11, 

12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 

24, 9, 19A, 20A, 25, 

30, 30A, 31 and 23 

78/2A 

61/Part of 8 Lot 6 
15/2 

22/10 Lot 2 
17/18 Lot 26 



Eugene Dussault 

Michael McCoy 

New England Telephone 



78/3B Lot 2 

49/57D 

R3/49 



HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

Two significant projects dominated the work of the Housing Partnership during 
1993 - the development of affordable homes on town-owned land on Avon Street 
and Denault Drive and a privately-initiated development known as Buckingham 
Estates in the Aldrich Road area. 

The Partnership solicited proposals for the development of affordable housing 
on town-owned land in early 1993. Three proposals were submitted and the 
developers presented them at a public meeting to the Partnership and 
neighborhood residents. L.A. Associates of Wilmington was selected by the 
Partnership and was officially designated by the Board of Selectmen. Based on 
additional neighborhood input and soil testing, the number of homes were 
reduced and the proposed development now consists of one affordable single 
family home at the intersection of Avon Street and Avery Street and two 
affordable single family homes on Denault Drive. The proposed homes are 
consistent in character with the neighborhood in terms of the lot size and 
2style of home. Split gambrel capes and a garrison will be constructed and 
sold for $94,500. The construction of Avon Street extension with three 
proposed homes is dependent upon securing funding for the roadway 
construction. 

As recommended by the Partnership and voted by the Selectmen, the approval 
process for the proposed development was handled locally, rather than through 
the state, to enable all homes to be sold to Wilmington residents. The 
development has been permitted through the Board of Appeals through the 
granting of variances and the Housing Partnership has been designated by the 
Board of Selectmen as the town entity responsible for monitoring the 
development of the homes. In addition to project development, site plan and 
construction issues, the Partnership will be responsible for overseeing the 
marketing of the homes, the lottery selection process and the project 
timeframe. The Conservation Commission and the Building and Health Inspectors 
will be responsible for aspects of the development in which they have routine 
jurisdiction. 

Throughout the course of the year the Partnership was actively involved in the 
review of Buckingham Estates, a proposed 22 lot affordable housing development 
to be constructed in accordance with the state's Local Initiative Program. 
Six homes will be affordable and are proposed to be sold at $94,500. The 
proposed styles of affordable homes are gambrels, garrisons and one 
handicapped-adaptable cape. Based on Partnership and neighborhood input the 
design of the proposed development was improved to incorporate cul-de-sacs at 



-38- 



the end of the proposed roads, rather than dead-ends, and additional housing 
styles, as well as other conditions. The development received a comprehensive 
permit from the Board of Appeals. 

Both units at Silverhurst Avenue were sold to eligible first-time homebuyers 
during 1993, completing a three year process. In addition to an affordable 
sales price, the second homebuyer was able to qualify for financial assistance 
toward the downpayment and closing costs through the Small Cities Program. 

In addition, the Partnership continued to review progress at Shawsheen 
Commons . 

Housing Partnership members throughout 1993 included Robert Cain, Rocco 
DePasquale, Carole Hamilton, Mark Haldane, Gregory Erickson, Raymond Forest, 
Bruce MacDonald, James Russo, Vaughn Surprenant and Rev. Michael Stotts. New 
members appointed by the Town Manager are Charles Boyle, Charles Fiore, and 
Lester White. Robert DiPalma, Thomas Siracusa and Odette Kent resigned and 
the Partnership thanks them for their hard work and dedication. The 
Partnership meets the second Thursday each month and welcomes interested 
residents to attend the meetings. 




-39- 



Accepted Streets 



STREET 

Adams Street from 

Adelaide Street from 

Agostino Drive from 

Aldrich Road from 

Allgrove Lane from 

Allen Park Drive from 

Andover Street from 

Andover Street from 

Andrew Street from 

Anthony Avenue from 

Apollo Drive from 

Appletree Lane from 

Arlene Avenue from 

Auburn Avenue from 

Ayotte Street from 

Baker Street from 

Baland Road from 

Ballardvale St. from 

Ballardvale St. from 

Bancroft Street from 

Barbara Avenue from 

Beacon Street from 

Beech Street from 

Beeching Avenue from 

Belmont Avenue from 

Benson Road from 

Biggar Avenue from 

Birchwood Road from 

Birchwood Road from 

Blanchard Road from 

Boutwell Street from 

Brand Avenue from 

Brand Avenue from 

Brattle Street from 

Brentwood Avenue from 

Bridge Lane from 

Bridge Lane from 

Broad Street from 

Burlington Avenue from 

Burnap Street from 

Burnap Street from 

Burt Road from 

Butters Row from 

Buzzell Drive from 

Canal Street from 

Carolyn Road from 

Carson Avenue from 

Carter Lane from 

Catherine Avenue from 

Cedar Street from 

Cedar Crest Road from 

Central Street from 

Chandler Road from 



LOCATION 

Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 
Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Gandalf Way 

Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 
Woburn Street 

Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 
Salem Street 

Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 
Aldrich Road to beyond Houghton Road 
Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 
Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 
Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 
Salem Street to Ella Avenue 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 

Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Ave. 

Ballardvale Street 

Salem Street to Route 125 

Route 12 5 to Andover Line 

Liberty Street 

Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 
Church Street to Belmont Avenue 
Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 
Cunningham Street to Faulkner Ave. 
Columbia Street to State Street 
Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 
Salem Street to Ring Avenue 
Shady Lane Drive 
Judith Road 
Kendall Road 

Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 
Bridge Lane 

Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 
Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Ave. 
Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 
Shawsheen Avenue 

Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 
King Street 

Main Street to Burlington Line 
Grove Avenue 
Winchell Road 

Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 
Main Street to Chestnut Street 
Draper Drive to Evans Drive 

Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 
North Street to Marcia Road 
Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 
Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Norfolk Ave, 
Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 
Burt Road to Harris Street 
Pinewood Road to Judith Road 
Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Adams Street to Kelley Road 



lj£>riu 1 n 


DATE ( 


3 ) ACCEPTED 


2 915 


1908 




666 


1976 




999 


1979 




6 740 


1894 




470 


1993 




2 319 


1971 


1984 


180 


1894 




11, 300 


1894 


1970 


435 


1985 




300 


1966 




300 


1971 




994 


1990 




3 7 54 


1966 


1978 


7 55 


1945 




240 


1947 




684 


1945 




540 


1972 




965 


1894 




12 000 


1894 


1985 


400 


1952 




850 


1966 




970 


1915 




1 005 


1947 




440 


1959 




980 


1933 




616 


197 1 




1 , 282 


1975 




1 197 


1952 




400 


1953 




62 5 


1989 




4 144 


1894 




510 


1933 


1943 


950 


1933 


1943 


1 , 066 


1945 




1,017 


1938 




455 


1894 




754 


1894 




1, 377 


1954 




8, 588 


1894 




1,145 


1953 




484 


1945 




1,653 


1945 


1946 


3 577 


1894 




600 


1971 




1 505 


1939 


195 5 


1 , 268 


1960 


1971 


1,017 


1961 




1,411 


1957 




1,000 


1966 




687 


1945 




1, 100 


1963 




552 


1950 




400 


1957 





-40- 









LENGTH 


DATE ( ! 


3 ) ACCEPTED 


Cnaprnan Av©nue 


- 

rem 


Hatnaway Road to sneridan Road 


1,575 


1951 


1971 


Charlotte Road 


rrotn 


Gunderson Rd. to beyond Apollo Dr. 


859 


1971 




Chas6 Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


297 


1953 




Chestnut Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Woburn Li.ne 


11 , 480 


1894 




Church Street 




Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 


4, 285 


1894 




uiarK oureet 


from 


Main Street to Church Street 


2 , 470 


1894 


1969 


Clorinda Road 


from 


Agostino Drive 


887 


1979 




Cochrane Road 


from 


r u£^eB c oureeu uo naDasn Koau 


800 


1947 




CoXurrJDi.a Street 




Church St. to beyond Belmont Avenue 


1 , 150 


1908 


1933 


Concord Street 




Federal Street to North Reading Line 


5 , 803 


1894 




Congress Street 




Forest Street to Burlington Line 


977 


1939 




Coo)c Avenue 


from 


Ma i n SI- re^t^t 
naxii w u X. CCS L> 


O J. J 








f om 




270 


1951 










J OD 






Cornell Place 


from 


Fordham Road 


747 


1982 




Cottage Street 


from 


Main Street 


927 


1954 




Crest Avenue 


from 


Ayotte Street 


558 


1947 




Cross Street 


from 


Main Street to Lowell Street 


697 


1894 




Cunningham St. 




Salem Street to Beeching Ave 


2 , 447 


1944 


1952 1953 


Cushxng Drive 


from 




QQD 






Cypress Street 


rom 






1951 




Dadant Drive 


from 


wortn ocreeu to nortn otreet 


1 , 760 


1964 




Davis Road 


from 


Main Street 


o uu 


1952 




Dayton Road 


rom 


Hathaway Road 


170 


1951 




Dell Drive 




Burlington Avenue 


± f 1 


1 Q C Q 


1971 


Dexter Street 


rom 


Main Street 




1979 




Dobson Street 




Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 










from 




1 214 


1951 




Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


l'490 


1960 




Douglas Avenue 


from 


Palmer Way 


1,017 


1989 




n T" a T" n T" i \7 
Lf L a^cx. X V cr 


from 




1 560 


1959 


1971 


Drury Lane 


rom 




633 






Dublin Avenue 


rom 


Main Street 


3UU 


1 Q C 1 




Dunton Road 


rom 


Nassau Avenue 




1 O C £ 
i.y DO 








Mil 1 T\ voo^ ^ r\ Wr^Wn t"ti T'oot' 


3 200 


1894 




Edward Road 


from 


Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Rd* 




1 Q A T 




Ella Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,043 


1978 




El wood Road 


from 


Forest Street 


642 


1968 






from 




590 


1951 




Englewood Drive 


rom 


Kenwood Drive 


455 


1971 




Evans Drive 






2 071 


1971 










480 


1979 




r axx. L xcxu r\wau 






1 299 


1946 




Fairmeadow Road 






2 328 


1958 




c a 1.1. iiiwii u rwciiuc 


f ^om 


i X ' jr rvuau 


952 


1971 






from 


*;t-Ato ^t-rppt 


648 


1933 




TS'anoiii 1 riT*i\70 
















to beyond Harvard Avenue 


790 


1950 






f om 


OXCll X\waU \m\J %J OLK^KJkJO O L. X CC? 


1 946 


1944 


1953 




from 




714 


1938 


1945 


Federal Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,740 


1894 




Ferguson Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,073 


1967 




Flagstaff Road 


from 


Nichols Street 


587 


1989 




Fletcher Lane 


from 


Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 


792 


1977 




Floradale Avenue 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


627 


1970 




Fordham Road 


from 


North Reading Line 


3,714 


1971 





-41- 



STREET 

Forest Street 
Fox Run Drive 
Franklin Avenue 
Frederick Drive 
Freeport Drive 

Gandalf Way 
Gearty Street 
Glen Road 
Glendale Circle 
Glenview Road 
Gloria Way 
Gowing Road 
Grace Drive 
Grand Avenue 
Grant Street 
Great Neck Drive 
Grove Avenue 
Grove Street 
Gunderson Road 

Hamlin Lane 
Hanover Street 
Hanson Road 
Hardin Street 
Harnden Street 
Harold Avenue 
Harris Street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Hawthorne Road 
Heather Drive 
Henry L. Drive 
High Street 
Hillside Way 
Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 
Hopkins Street 
Houghton Road 

Industrial Way 

Jaquith Road 
Jere Road 
Jewel Drive 
Jones Avenue 
Jonspin Road 
Judith Road 

Kajin Way 
Kelley Road 
Kendall Street 
Kenwood Avenue 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock Street 
King Street 
King Street Ext. 
Kirk Street 





LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


from 




4, 100 


1894 


1976 




from 


High Street 


975 


1989 






from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


739 


1978 






from 


Salem Street 


1,070 


1966 






from 


Park Street to Lucaya Circle 


2,086 


1979 






from 


Glen Road to Agoetino Drive 


549 


1 QTQ 

i.7 / 7 






from 


Ring Avenue 


627 


1989 






from 


Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 


6,870 


1894 






from 


Glen Road to Lawrence Street 


1,304 








from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1 Q i;Q 






from 


Broad Street 


770 


1 QPQ 

i. 707 






from 


Park Street to Marcus Road 


941 


1956 






from 


Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Melody Lane 


2,514 


1966 






from 


Corey Avenue 


815 


1952 










780 


i.74 J 






from 


Woburn Street 


536 


1 QAQ 






from 


Main Street to Lake Street 


4,147 








from 


Reading Line 


120 


X 7 9 / 






from 


Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 


1,506 


1 Q C Q 


1 Qce. 

17DD 




from 


Lawrence Street 


540 


1962 






from 


Atlantic Avenue 


574 


X 7OO 






from 


Woodland Road 


838 


X7O7 






from 


Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 


428 


1 Q K 1 






from 


Main Street to Glen Road 


600 


1895 






from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 


1,312 


1971 






from 


Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 


806 


1 Oil c 






from 


Main Street to River Street 


430 


1951 






from 


Woburn Street to Evans Drive 


3,270 


1951 


1953 


1959 


from 


Woburn Street 


230 


1956 






from 


Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 


1,286 


1979 






from 


Woburn Street 


651 


1993 






from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


3,585 


1894 








Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 


2 230 


1914 






from 


Suncrest Avenue 


'364 


1959 






from 


Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


1 , 560 


1743 


1951 


1952 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,051 


J.074 


1972 


1975 


from 


Kendall Street to Andrew Street 


1,702 


1985 






from 


Woburn Street to West Street 


4,430 


1974 






from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,398 


1938 


1949 


1951 






1 248 


1968 






from 


Eames Street 


l'303 


1985 






from 


Glen Road 


717 


1940 






from 


Andover Street 


3,800 


1993 






from 


Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


400 


1953 






from 


Woburn Street 


455 


1989 






from 


Chandler Road 


923 


1957 






from 


Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 


1,420 


1945 






from 


Woburn St. to beyond Englewood Dr. 


1,725 


1970 


1971 




from 


Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 


693 


1958 






from 


West Street to beyond Morgan Road 


1,840 


1894 






from 


Glen Road to Broad Street 


2,400 


1940 


1945 




from 


Glen Road 


487 


1979 






from 


Main Street 


575 


1951 







-42- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE ( . 


5) ACCEPTED 


Lake Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3,855 


1894 




Lang Street 


from 


Bancroft Street 


409 


1952 




Laurel Avenue 


from 


Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


1950 




Lawrence Court 


from 


Lawrence Street 


728 


1956 




Lawrence Street 


from 


Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4,013 


1956 




Ledgewood Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


383 


1959 




Lexington Street 


from 


Cunningham Street to Morningside Dr. 


714 


1974 




Liberty Street 


from 


Federal Street 


740 


1943 




Lincoln Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 




Linda Road 


from 


High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1, 760 


1950 




Lloyd Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,050 


1951 




Lockwood Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 




Longview Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 




Lorin Drive 


from 


Swain Road 


560 


1992 




Loumac Road 


from 


Drury Lane 


510 


1963 




Lowell Street 


from 


Main Street to Reading Line 


10, 152 


1894 


1978 


Lowell St. Park 


from 


Lowell Street 


580 


1908 


1957 1958 


Lucaya Circle 


from 


Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


2 , 469 


1979 




Mackey Road 


from 


Federal Street 


250 


1943 




Magazine Road 


from 


Wisser Street 


320 


1973 




Magazine Street 


from 


Taplin Avenue 


190 


1973 




Main Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21, 387 


1894 




Marcia Road 


from 


North Street to beyond Carolyn Rd. 


2 , 806 


1962 


1971 


Marcus Road 


from 


Gowing Road 


2,315 


1958 




Marie Drive 


from 


Woburn St. to beyond Gunderson Road 


1, 525 


1961 


1966 


Marion Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to beyond 












Clifton Street 


1,876 


1945 




Marjorie Road 


from 


Main Street 


1, 392 


1951 




Massachusetts Ave 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brattle St. 


810 


1945 




McDonald Road 


from 


Salem Street 


2,621 


1944 




Meadow Lane 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1957 




Melody Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 




Middlesex Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Salem Street 


12, 140 


1894 




Miles Street 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 




Miller Road 


from 


Glen Road 


638 


1945 




Moore Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond 












Wedgewood Avenue 


1,528 


1967 




Morgan Road 


from 


Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 




Morningside Drive 


from 


Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1974 




Morse Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1, 360 


1939 




Mystic Avenue 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1, 298 


1908 


1988 


Nassau Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1, 566 


1946 




Nathan Road 


from 


Senpek Road 


1 , 057 


1971 




Nichols Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3, 801 


1894 




Nickerson Avenue 


from 


West Street 


953 


1947 




Norfolk Avenue 


from 


Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1954 




North Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3,515 


1945 




No. Washington 












Avenue 


from 


Agostino Drive 


858 


1979 




Nunn Road 


from 


Kelley Road 


214 


1965 




Oak Street 


from 


Salem Street 


355 


1951 




Oakdale Road 


from 


Short Street to Judith Road 


2,301 


1950 




Oakridge Circle 


from 


Gowing Road to Gowing Road 


1,730 


1958 




Oakwood Road 


from 


Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 




Olson Street 


from 


Church Street 


122 


1957 





-43- 



STREET 

Palmer Way 
Park Street 
Parker Street 
Patches Pond Lane 
Patricia Circle 
Pershing Street 
Phillips Avenue 
Pilcher Drive 
Pilling Road 
Pine Avenue 
Pineridge Road 
Pineview Road 
Pinewood Road 
Pleasant Road 
Powder House 

Circle 
Presidential Dr. 
Progress Way 

Quail Run 

Radcliff Road 
Railroad Avenue 
Reading Avenue 
Redwood Terrace 
Reed Street 
Research Drive 
Richmond Street 
Ridge Road 
Ring Avenue 
River Street 
Roberts Road 
Rollins Road 
Roosevelt Road 
Route 62 
Royal Street 



LOCATION 
from Middlesex Avenue 

from Woburn Street to No. Reading Line 
from Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 
from Chestnut Street to a dead end 
from Dell Drive 
from Federal Street 

from Wild Ave. to beyond Baker Street 

from the end of Gearty Street 

from Hathaway Road 

from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 

from North St. to Linda Road 

from Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 

from Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 

from Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 

from Middlesex Avenue 
from Boutwell Street 
from Industrial Way 

from Woburn Street 

from South Street to Benson Road 
from Clark Street 
from Oakwood Road 
from Kenwood Avenue 

from Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Harold Ave, 

from Ballardvale Street 

from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 

from Suncrest Avenue 

from Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 

from Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Ave. 

from Burlington Ave. to Burlington Ave. 

from Marion Street to Fenway Street 

from Boutwell Street to Swain Road 

from Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 

from Salem Street 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



1,437 
4,180 
2,000 
1,185 
595 
720 
1,519 
410 
954 
380 
914 
450 
1,364 
750 

710 
826 
630 



355 
650 
215 
645 
1,090 
1,817 
1,800 
365 
1, 150 
453 
1,861 
200 
1,980 
3,343 
1,043 



1989 
1895 
1919 
1990 
1958 
1943 
1946 
1989 
1959 
1945 
1960 
1953 
1954 
1962 

1954 
1977 
1974 



500 1992 



1971 
1909 
1979 
1970 
1971 
1989 
1973 
1956 
1975 
1962 
1967 
1954 
1946 
1958 
1951 



1954 1981 



Salem Street 

Salem Street 

Scaltrito Drive 
School Street 
Senpek Road 
Sewell Road 
Shady Lane Drive 
Shawsheen Avenue 

Sherburn Place 
Sheridan Road 
Sherwood Road 
Silver Lake Ave. 
Sparhawk Drive 
Sprucewood Road 
State Street 
Strout Avenue 
Suncrest Avenue 
Swain Road 



from Tewksbury Line to beyond 

Ballardvale Street 8,895 1894 
from North Reading Line to beyond 

Woburn Street 6,475 1894 

from Salem Street 785 1974 

from Middlesex Ave. to beyond Drury Lane 1,139 1915 1963 

from Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 280 1971 

from Hathaway Road 300 1955 

from Middlesex Ave. to Lawrence Street 2,904 1950 1958 
from beyond Richmond Street 

to Billerica Line 11,845 1894 

from Shawsheen Avenue 723 1975 

from Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 1,021 1951 1971 

from Forest Street to Cochrane Road 445 1971 

from Lake Street to Dexter Street 455 1954 

from Park Street to Heather Drive 361 1979 

from Shady Lane Drive 690 1952 

from Belmont Ave. to Fairview Ave. 315 1933 

from Lowell Street 908 1955 

from West Street to Ledgewood Road 1,246 1954 

from Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 2,290 1922 1929 



-44- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE ( J 


>) ACCEPTED 


Taft Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1 


, 985 


1938 




Taplin Avenue 


from 


Wisser Street 




to J. 


1946 




Taplin Avenue 


from 


Baker Street 




y uu 


1946 




Temple Street 


from 


Church Street 




214 


1911 




Thrush Road 


from 


Salem Street to Marie Drive 




400 


1961 




Thurston Avenue 


from 


Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 




623 


1907 




Tomahawk Drive 


from 


Aldrich Road 




575 


1989 




Towpath Drive 




Towpath Drive to a dead end 




463 






Towpath Drive 


from 


Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 




914 


1990 




Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive 




870 


1993 




Tracy Circle 




Woburn Street 




675 


1992 




Truman Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 




300 


1953 




Unnamed Street 


from 


Salem Street to Andover Street 




470 


1958 




Upton Court 




Andover Street 




500 






Valyn Lane 


from 


Salem Street 




ana 


1989 




Veranda Avenue 


from 


Main Street 




847 


1916 




Virginia Road 


from 


No. Reading Line to No. Reading Line 


± 




1954 




Walker Street 


from 


Main Street 




42 3 


1958 




Warren Road 


from 


Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 




9 7 


1954 




Washington Avenue 


from 


Clark Street to Stone Street 




650 


1920 




Webber Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue 




677 


1969 




Wedgewood Avenue 


from 


Moore Street 




476 


1967 




West Street 


from 


Woburn Street to Reading Line 


s 


372 


1894 


1978 


Westdale Avenue 


from 


West Street 




,211 


1942 




Wicks Circle 


from 


Everett Avenue 




533 


1971 




Wightman Road 


from 


Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 




239 


1954 




Wild Avenue 


from 


Grove Avenue 




050 


1910 




Wildwood Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 




290 


1894 




Williams Avenue 


from 


Main Street 




706 


1940 




Wilson Street 


from 


Federal Street 




760 


1943 




Wilton Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1 


,151 


1966 




Winchell Road 


from 


Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 




193 


1945 




Wing Road 


from 


Woburn Street 




746 


1958 




Wisser Street 


from 


Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1 


,146 


1950 




Woburn Street 


from 


Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23 


, 122 


1894 


1978 


Woodland Road 


from 


Lowell Street 


1 


,174 


1969 





-45- 



Redevelopment Authority 



In 1993, the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority completed the conceptual plan 
for roadway improvements for Route 38 from Middlesex Avenue to the Tewksbury 
town line. The plan, prepared by Authority consultants Fay, Spofford and 
Thorndike was approved by the Wilmington Board of Selectmen, the Massachusetts 
Highway Department District 4 office and placed on the list of accepted state 
projects for 1995. 

Also during the year, the Authority engaged the services of Bruce Campbell and 
Associates to work with the Massachusetts Highway Department and its 
consultants to coordinate the Route 62 bridge construction projects with Route 
38 improvements. 

Three members of the Authority served with the Strategic Planning Grant Task 
Force during the year. The resultant study final report will serve as a 
starting point for proposed zoning plans. Route 38 corridor plans and town 
center parking studies. Funding for the study was made possible by a 
$10,000.00 donation from the Redevelopment Authority which secured a 
$20,000.00 grant from the Commonwealth. 

In addition to current projects, the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority has 
provided the Town of Wilmington with continuing benefits from its investment 
in the Jewel Drive Industrial Park for the past 20 years. At the end of 1993, 
there were 11 businesses operating in Jewel Park employing a total of 950 
workers. Based upon fiscal year 1993 data provided by the Assessor's Office, 
the total assessed value of the park was $15,768,700 and the annual tax 
revenue to the Town of Wilmington totalled $297,594.55. 

The officers of the Authority are as follows: Vaughn R. Surprenant, Chairman; 
Charles N. Gilbert, Vice Chairman; Sidney R. Kaizer, Treasurer; Patricia F. 
Duggan, Assistant Treasurer; and Dennis Volpe, Secretary. 

Recycling Advisory Committee 



The Committee is pleased to report that four years after its first meeting, it 

has achieved its goal: curbside collection of recyclables. The committee 

recommended that the town prepare a request for proposal for collection of 
recyclables. 



Robert Palmer, Superintendent of Public Works, prepared such a document for 
distribution to interested vendors. In May of 1993, the town awarded a 
contract for curbside collection of both solid waste and recyclables to Allied 
Cartage, Inc. of Woburn, Massachusetts. The curbside recycling program took 
effect on August 2, 1993. Initially the program consisted of curbside 
collection of newspaper, magazines, glass and aluminum. The recycling drop- 
off center remained open for collection of corrugated cardboard, yard waste 
and #2 plastic. 

In an effort to make the entire recycling 
program more convenient for residents, #2 
plastic milk and juice containers were 
added to the list of recyclable items 
collected at curbside. White goods 
continued to be collected at curbside one 
day a week. The recycling drop-off center 
was closed to disposal of all items except 
yard waste. These changes took effect 
beginning November 1, 1993. The fact that 
this service is being provided at no 
additional cost to residents is a 
tremendous accomplishment. 




-46- 



Assistant Town Manager Jeffrey M. Hull moving into 
his new office (formerly the Town Clerk's Office). 



Each household was provided with a recycling bin at no charge. Information 
about the curbside recycling collection program and the fall yard waste 
collection program was provided to all residents via direct mailing and was 
also included with the distribution of bins. Recyclables are collected at 
each household once every two weeks on the same day as trash collection. Each 
homeowner was issued a calendar which highlights the weeks that recyclables 
are collected in their neighborhood. Weeks are highlighted in either green or 
blue to correspond to the color of the recycling bins which were issued to 
residents. 



Board of Health 



The Board of Health consists of three members appointed by the Town Manager 
for 3 year terms. Serving on the Board throughout 1993 were Dr. Jcunes 
Ficociello D.D.S., Mr. Joseph Paglia and Mr. Milton Calder, Sr. The Director 
of Public Health is Gregory Erickson R.S., C.H.O., and the Public Health Nurse 
is Ann FitzGerald, R.N. The Animal Control Officer is Ellen Davis. The 
secretarial staff (which is shared with the Building Commissioner and Board of 
Appeals) consists of Joan Goulet and Toni LaRivee. In addition, Michael 
Saraco, R.S. and Pamela Ross-Kung, R.S., have been contracted to conduct a 
portion of the field inspections on a part-time basis. 

Field inspections include restaurants, retail food stores, cafeterias in the 
industrial buildings and in the schools, mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks, 
the Fourth of July carnival, caterers, the Farm Stand at the Aleppo Temple and 
other temporary food stands, percolation tests, all subsurface sewage disposal 
permits and inspections, nuisance complaints, noise pollution, hazardous waste 
spills, leaking underground storage tanks, safe and sanitary housing 
inspections, lead paint determinations and inspections, smoking and tobacco 
law enforcement, lake and beach water quality, and other miscellaneous 
inspections , 

The administrative duties of the office include the licensing and the 
enforcement of many of the above items, including issuing orders, issuing 
citations, holding hearings, attending meetings and court actions. Other 
administrative duties include the creation of health or risk prevention 
programs and distributing information on various health issues. 

The Board of Health has been awarded a grant of $25,000 by the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health for the implementation of a Tobacco Control 
Program. This program will employ two part-time persons and will have as its 
goal the reduction of tobacco use in the Town of Wilmington to 50% by the year 
2000. 

Our radon detection and survey progreim continues to provide low cost radon 
kits for the public, as a result of a two year contract with NITON of Bedford, 
Massachusetts, wherein residents of the Town of Wilmington can purchase radon 
detection test kits (2 tests per kit) for $16.00 at the office of the Board of 
Health. 

A rabies clinic was held during Rabies Awareness Week in May at the Highway 
Department facilities on Andover Street and another in November at the Fourth 
of July Building. 

A pediatric immunization clinic is offered the 3rd Tuesday of the month at 
Wilmington Pediatrics in the Winchester Hospital Family Medical Center at no 
fee for Wilmington residents. Blood lead tests are offered as well. 

Public health nursing home visits totaled 146, office visits 229, as well as 
calls for medication, nutrition and referral assistance. 

The nurse attended conferences relating to blood pressure, heart disease, 
diabetes, current public health issues and the Massachusetts Tobacco Control 
Program. The Board of Health co-sponsored a Breast Health Awareness Forum in 
September with Lahey Clinic and Winchester Hospital. WCTV taped the event for 
future televising on the local cable access channel. The Lahey Clinic 



-47- 



provided a "Train the Trainer" program so that the nurse can now train others 
in breast self exam for the early detection of breast cancer. A Breast Self 
Exam Workshop was held at the Buzzell Senior Center. Two additional workshops 
will be offered in the spring of 1994. 

A. Communicable Disease Control; 
1, Immunizations 
Office-Flu 
Home-Flu 
Clinic-Flu 
Pneumovax 
Hepatitis B 
Fees Collected 



2. Communicable Diseases Reported 74 
Home Visits 5 

3. Tuberculosis Contacts 3 
Office Visits 252 
Home Visits 2 

B. Public Health Nursing ; 

1. Premature births reported 
Home Visits 

2. Morbidity-V.N.A. Calls 8 
Office Visits 8 

3. Newborn Infants-Home Visits 

4. General Health Supervision-Home Visits 83 
Office Visits (injections, weights) 211 

5. Hypertension Screening-Office Visits 722 

6. Diabetic Screening-Office Visits 9 
Fees Collected $9.00 

7 . Other Screenings 

Breast Self-Exsuninations 39 

Blood Pressure 56 

Tuberculosis Testing 54 

Health Fair 29 

8. Senior Counseling/Drop-In Center 

Number of Sessions 41 

Hypertension Screening 694 

Cholesterol Screening 103 

Blood Sugar Screening 512 

General Health (Injections) 12 

Deming Way - Hypertension Screening 28 

Health Fairs - Hypertension Screening 81 
Fees Collected $52.00 

9. Lead Paint Testing 18 

10. Kodak Analyzer Testing 102 
Number of Tests 120 
Fees Collected $570.00 

11. Meetings 51 

12. Vaccine Distribution 69 

13. TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $831.00 



246 

190 
30 
1,377 
43 
14 

$200.00 



-48- 



C. Environmental Health; 

1. Transport/Haulers 26 
Stable 38 
Miscellaneous 31 
Perk 140 
Sewage 148 
Food 78 
Milk 
Installers 23 
Sub-Divisions 22 

TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $62,623.00 

2. Meetings Attended 184 

3. Sewage Inspections 353 

4. No. of Septic Plans Reviewed/NEW 56 

5. No. of Septic Plans Reviewed/REPAIRS 32 

6. Food Establishment Inspections 
Restaurants 5 
Cafeterias 
Charitable Food Facilities 
Retail Food 1 
Residential Kitchens 1 
Mobile Food 12 

7. Food Establishment Re-Inspections 
Restaurants 6 
Cafeterias 
Charitable Food Facilities 
Retail Food 
Residential Kitchens 
Mobile Food 

8. Nuisance Complaints/Inspections 46 

9. Nuisance Complaints/Re-Inspections 36 

10. Hous-ing Inspections 15 

11. Housing Re-Inspections 14 

12. Percolation/Water Tests 401 

13. Court Appearances 7 

14. Court Re-Appearances 

15. Hazardous Waste Investigations 14 

16. Camp Inspections 

17. Miscellaneous Inspections 59 

18. Lead Inspections 55 



-49- 



Housing Authority 



The Wilmington Housing Authority, organized in 1951, operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of the Massachusetts General Laws, Section VIII, 
24CFR (Code of Federal Regulations); Chapter 30B of the State Procurement Law, 
and State and Federal Codes of Ethics. All state and federal programs are 
audited on an annual basis. A five-member Board of Commissioners, consisting 
of four elected and one state appointed member, oversees the Authority's 
policies and procedures. The Executive Director is charged with the 
administration of these procedures. 

The Authority, originally consisting of 40 units of housing, is now providing 
affordable housing for 72 seniors and 13 (705) families and includes 
conventional housing owned by the Authority. As always, the Authority gives 
first preference for housing to Wilmington residents. The Authority also 
services the Federal Section 8 and. voucher programs. 

The engineering designs for the renovation of the pipe system at Deming Way 
Apartments have been submitted to the Executive Office of Communities and 
Development (EOCD) for approval, and the work is expected to commence in early 
1994. 

The state leased housing program has been severely curtailed and the Authority 
is seeking other ways in which it can provide housing for both senior citizens 
and families. Currently, all programs are leased at 100%. 

The senior citizen population of 80 years of age and over is the fastest 
growing population today, and this poses a problem in providing enough housing 
for those seniors in failing health who cannot live totally independently but 
who should not be placed in a nursing home. The Wilmington Housing 
Authority's tenants, in conjunction with Minuteman Home Care, receive home 
care and other social services in an effort to assist them to live 
independently. However, more is needed, and another program currently being 
pursued by the Authority is housing for frail elders, which would provide 
housing, meals, medical care and other services, while allowing seniors to 
maintain private quarters. 

The year 1993 was very progressive for the Authority and its tenants. Some of 
the major accomplishments were: all walkways were paved, an additional 
parking area was provided, a screen house was built, outside of the units were 
painted and underground oil tanks were removed at our Deming Way development. 
In addition, we painted, replaced stairs and reroofed several homes for our 
low income families. 

The Share Program was started by several of our seniors at Deming Way and our 
facility is used to distribute food. 



BOARD MEMBERS 



EXPIRATION OF TERM 



Alfred N. Meegan, Jr. - Chairman 
Charles Fiore, Jr. - Vice Chairman 
Dorothy A. Butler - Treasurer 

Lillian Hupper - Vice Treasurer/State Appointee 
Melvin Keough - Secretary 



April 1997 
April 1998 
April 1995 
March 1998 
April 1994 



-50- 



Town Counsel 



On January 1, 1993, there were pending the following actions by or against the 
Town (exclusive of actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, 
and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien foreclosure proceedings in 
the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*). 

Frances Dec v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination #77-BEM 0731, 0732 (complaint alleging sex discrimination) 

Fosters Pond Improvement Association, Inc. et al v. Aldo Caira, et al . 
Middlesex Superior Court #78-4771 (action in the nature of certiorari for 
decision of Board of Selectmen granting earth removal permit) 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert Corey, aka. et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
(complaint alleging violation of Town Zoning By-Law and Inland Wetland Act) 

Dianna Holmes, et al v. Town of Wilmington . Suffolk Superior Court #54601 
(complaint for discrimination in violation of Chapter 151B) 

Ruth E. Marranzini. et al v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
(appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) 

William Baldwin, ppa. et al v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court 
#85-676 (claim for personal injury) 

Ralph Fiore Bus Service. Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior 
Court #85-3048 (complaint under Mass. Antitrust Act, G.L.c.93) 

Joyce Corey v. Town of Wilmington, et al, Middlesex Superior Court #86-146W 
(claim for violation of civil rights and injunctive relief) 

James Bruce, Administrator, et al v. Clifford A. Singelais, et al. Middlesex 
Superior Court #87-0838 (third party tort action for claim of negligence) 

Michelle A. Carbone, ppa. et al v. William Clifford, Administrator of the 
Estate of Mary E. Clifford, v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior 
Court (action for wrongful death pursuant to G.L.c.229, s.2 and third party 
claim G.L.C.231B) 

Robert McSweeney v. Bruce MacDonald. et al. Middlesex Superior Court #87-3541 
(action for appeal of a decision of the Board of Appeals and claims under the 
Massachusetts Constitution and Title 42, section 1983, U.S.C.) 

Charles Sullivan v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court (transferred from 
Middlesex Superior Court) 

Max Johnson v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Land Court (transferred from Middlesex 
Superior Court) 

Brentwood Enterprise Trust v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington . 
Department of Community Affairs, Housing Appeals Committee #1989-20 (appeal to 
Housing Appeals Committee from denial of comprehensive permit) 

Robert Andersen, et al v. Reginald S. Stapczynski. et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court #89-3378 (complaint seeking equitable relief relative to G.L.c.149, 
s. 19B) 

Richard Stuart, Trustee, et al v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington . 
Land Court #42097 (appeal of decisions of Board of Appeals denying 
reconsideration of a prior decision, denial of variances and denial of 
applications concerning official map (C.41, S.81E)) 

Middlesex Thirteen Realty Associates and Carl Youngman v. Wilmington Board of 
Appeals, et al . Middlesex Superior Court #90-1187 (appeal of decision of Board 
of Appeals sustaining the decision of the Building Inspector in denying the 
issuance of a special permit) 



-51- 



T^non a rnrnnration. d/b/a J'B F ood & Deli v. Gregory Erickson, et al , 
Middlesex Superior Court #90-1330 (complaint for civil rights violation and 
declaratory judgment concerning use of premises and for certiorari) (partial 
judgment for the defendants on counts 4 and 5) (Subject to Notice of Appeal) 

Robert Andersen v. Justices of the Municip al Court of the City of Boston, et 
al, Middlesex Superior Court #90-1232 (appeal from decision of Justices of 
Boston Municipal Court) 

Earl L. Hupper. et al v. David J. Clark, et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
#90-6853 (appeal from a decision of the Planning Board (G.L.c.41, S.81BB)) 

Bruce MacDonald, et al. v. Wilmington Arboretum Apts. . et al . Middlesex 
Superior Court #90-4989 (appeal from decision of Housing Appeals Committee 
granting comprehensive permit/decision of Housing Court affirmed) Appeals 
Court #92P757 (appeal from decision of Middlesex Superior Court) 

Town of Wilmington v. Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems, Inc.. et al . Supreme 
Judicial Court #90-558 (appeal from a decision of the Department of Public 
Utilities - Cross appeals have been filed in the Supreme Judicial Court) 

Joseph C. Lundergan v. Contributory Retirement Appeal Board, et al . Middlesex 
Superior Court (appeal from decision of Contributory Retirement Appeal Board 
denying accidental disability retirement) 

Sandra L. Steiner v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court #91-6462 
(claim for personal injury) 

Robert J. Corey. Trustee v. William G» Hooper. Jr., et al, individually and as 
members of the Wilmington Planning Board , Middlesex Superior Court #91-1682 
(appeal from the denial of the Planning Board denying approval of Definitive 
Subdivision Plan) 

Scott C. Reinold v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
#91-4078 (tort complaint for damages alleging to tortious acts by the 
Wilmington Police Department) 

Harold L. Smith v. Town of Wilmington . Essex Superior Court #92-217 (action 
for personal injury) 

C. P. McDonough Construction. Inc.. Bankrupt /Employer ' s Insurance of Wausau v 
Town of Berwick. Maine and Town of Wilmington . Bankruptcy Court #91-19226-WCH 
(claim by surety for money allegedly due from Town) 

Priscilla Collins. Administratrix De Bonis Non of the Estate of Joseph James 
Roy V. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court, #92-4695 (action for 
personal injury) 

Helen T. Shay v. William G. Hooper, Jr., et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
#92-5870 (appeal of decision of the Planning Board) 

Shirley F. Callan v. Gertrude Condrey. et als . Middlesex Superior Court 
#92-7935 (action in the nature of certiorari and other requested relief) 

US Trust V. American Traveller. Inc.. et al . Middlesex Superior Court #92-5307 
(equity action to reach and apply funds claimed by the defendant, William Fay) 

Joseph P. McMenimen, et als v. Wilmington Arboretum Apts., et als . Middlesex 
Superior Court #92-6822 (appeal from further decision of Housing Appeals 
Committee) 

Town of Wilmington, et al v. Frances Dec, et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
#90-81861 (appeal from a decision of MCAD) 

Robert P. White, et al v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court 
(declaratory judgment for purpose of clarifying Board of Appeals' granting of 
special permit) 



-52- 



During the year 1993, the following new actions were brought against the Town 
of Wilmington or its officers or agents: 

Mildred F. Woods, et al v. Town of Wilmington . Land Court (petition to 
determine zoning relevancy) 

Robert J. Arsenault, et al v. Town Accountant of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex 
Superior Court #93-1555 (action for declaratory judgment) 

Jennifer L. Mullins. ppa. et al v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior 
Court #93-0472 (claim for personal injury) 

Presidential Development Corporation, et al v. Wilmington Planning Board , Land 
Court (appeal of a decision of the Planning Board pursuant to G.L. c. 41, 
S81BB) 

Ruth Tkachuk. et als v. Wilmington Board of Appeals, et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court #195418 CDJ, ZJA, ZBJ (action for zoning relief) 

Dorothy Wiberg v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination #93-BEM 1530 (complaint alleging discrimination in hiring) 

Keith R. McConnell et ux v. Board of Appeals, et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
#93-6539 (appeal from a decision of the Board of Appeals granting a variance) 

Richard Mullen v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Maiden District Court #93-01708 
(claim for personal injury) 

Joseph Lundergan v. Michael A. Caira. et al . Middlesex Superior Court #93-7035 
(request for equitable relief and restoration of lllF benefits) 

Robert P. Magliozzi. et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court #93-7141, (appeal from a decision of the Board of Appeals granting a 
variance ) 

Anna L. Percuoco v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Massachusetts Commission 
Against Discrimination #93-BEM 2185 (complaint alleging unlawful 
discrimination) 



During the year 1993, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf 
of the Town: 

Town of Wilmington v. Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination . 
Middlesex Superior Court (action for declaratory and injunctive relief and 
damages under 42 USC, S1983) 

Town of Wilmington v. William J. Fay, Jr. . a/k/a United States Bankruptcy 
Court, Southern District of Florida, Adv. #93-1058-BKC-RAM-A (objection to 
discharge bankruptcy) 



* There are pending as of January 1, 1994, separate petitions for abatements 
before the Appellate Tax Board, many involving claims for several different 
years. 



-53- 



During the year 1993, the following actions by or against the Town were 
disposed of: 

Shirley F. Callan v. Gertrude Condrev. et als , Middlesex Superior Court 
#92-7935 (disposed of by stipulation of dismissal and waiving all rights of 
appeal ) 

Robert P. White, et al v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court 
(disposed of by stipulation and agreement for judgment clarifying decision) 

Sandra L. Steiner v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court #91-6462 
(jury found no negligence against the town) 

Middlesex Thirteen Realty Associates and Carl Youngman v. Wilmington Board of 
Appeals, et al , Middlesex Superior Court /90-1187 (disposed of by voluntary 

dismissal by plaintiffs) 

Earl L. Hupper. et al v. David J. Clarlc. et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
#90-6853 (disposed of by agreement of all parties to dismiss action) 

Harold L. Smith v. Town of Wilmington . Essex Superior Court #92-217 (disposed 
of by settlement by insurer to the plaintiff) 

Helen T. Shay v. William G. Hooper. Jr.. et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
#92-5870 (motion to dismiss allowed by Court) 

Robert Andersen, et al v. Reginald S. Stapczvnski. et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court #89-3378 (disposed of by finding for plaintiffs in the amount of $500.00 
each and attorney fees, costs and interest in the amount of $3,311.18) 

Robert Andersen v. Justices of the Municipal Court of the City of Boston, et 
al . Middlesex Superior Court #90-1232 (disposed of by judgment of the 
Municipal Court of the City of Boston affirmed approving 30-day suspension 
without pay) 

Joseph C. Lunderqan v. Contributory Retirement Appeal Board, et al . Middlesex 
Superior Court (dismissed by Middlesex Superior Court) 

Robert J. Corey, Trustee v. William G. Hooper. Jr.. et al, individually and as 
members of the Wilmington Planning Board , Middlesex Superior Court #91-1682 
(disposed of by decision of the Middlesex Superior Court concerning 
constructive approval of the definitive subdivision plan) 

C. P. McDonough Construction, Inc., Bankrupt /Employer ' s Insurance of Wausau v. 
Town of Berwick, Maine and Town of Wilmington . Bankruptcy Court #91-19226-WCH 
(disposed of by order of Bankruptcy Court approving distribution to Wausau 
Insurance and Town of Wilmington each in the amount of $9,980.00) 

Brentwood Enterprise Trust v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington . 
Department of Community Affairs, Housing Appeals Committee #1989-20 (withdrawn 

by appellant) 



-54- 



Historical Commission 



The Wilmington Historical Commission congratulates the Middlesex Canal 
Association on their Bicentennial of the Middlesex Canal. We are very 
fortunate to have preserved several parts of the original canal which ran 
through Wilmington. The Middlesex Canal is a National Historic Civil 
Engineering Landmark and one of the earliest overland transportation canals in 
the Western Hemisphere. 

The Historical Commission continued, during the past year, to work toward the 
preservation of the West School. Members of the Commission attended numerous 
meetings with local and state officials; working on an assessment of the needs 
to upgrade the existing building. We are proceeding with an investigation of 
private grants to enable us to help the town in preserving this building. 

The Colonel Joshua Harnden Tavern continues to be open on the first Sunday of 
each month from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Informative tours are offered free of 
charge by the tenants. Josh and Lisa Winant. Newly acquired items at the 
Tavern include: an antique toboggan, a trunk, a mirrored sconce, articles of 
19th century clothing, historic slides and photos. 

The Tavern is now handicapped accessible via a ramp at the rear door. The 
Commission is thankful to the Public Buildings Department for building this 
ramp. 

The Commission equipped the Harnden Tavern with a television and VCR. We are 
planning on video taping a collection of programs to establish a video 
library. We anticipate that many of these will be closed captioned for the 
hearing impaired. 

The Commission hosted several school and youth organization tours of the 
Harnden Tavern. Our June open house featured a display of historic exhibits 
made by third grade students from the Woburn Street School. 

The Friends of the Harnden Tavern continued the tradition of holding 
Strawberry, Harvest and Christmas Festivals at the Tavern. The Commission 
commends the Friends for their consistent efforts and hard work to help enrich 
the Town through social activities at this 18th century tavern. 

Membership in the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Historic 
Massachusetts have been renewed. 

The Historical Commission is thankful to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, 
Public Works and Public Buildings Departments for their support and hard work. 

The Commission meets on the second Monday of the month in Room 4 of the Town 
Hall at 7:30 p.m. 



Carter Lecture Fund 



The Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund Committee was formed in 1910 as the result 
of a bequest to the town by Sarah D. J. Carter. The principal sum was to be 
invested and its income expended "in maintaining courses of lectures for the 
benefit of the people of Wilmington." This becpaest was accepted at a Town 
Meeting on March 1, 1909. 

This year's program held on May 13, 1993 at Barrow's Auditorium in the High 
School featured David Boeri, Channel 5 TV News Reporter. Mr. Boeri grew up in 
Wilmington and graduated from Wilmington High School. After finishing 
college, he spent three whale-hunting seasons living and working with the 
Eskimos and has written two books concerning the problems of the fishermen. 
He acted as a liaison for the government and fishermen while teaching at the 
University of Alaska. 



-55- 



His program, "The Last Frontier - Stories and Pictures of Alaska" told of his 
many experiences, the beauty and backwardness of the country, the dangers he 
encountered and his feelings for the land and people. Mr. Boeri's program was 
extremely popular with the large audience. Old friends, their parents, his TV 
followers and interested persons were all eager to attend, renew 
acquaintances, learn about his career and be entertained by his excellent 
slides and talk. David most graciously prolonged the evening, to the delight 
of all, by answering any and all questions asked of him. 

Much to the regret of committee members. Chairman Maybelle Bliss, resigned 
this year as she will move out of town. She has been a valuable part of this 
Committee since 1982 and will be missed. Longtime resident, Andrea Bischoff 
Houser, was honored to fill this vacancy. 

Currently serving on the Sarah D. J. Carter Fund Committee are: Elizabeth 
White, Chairman; Ann Berghaus, Recording Secretary; Dorothy Lafionatis, 
Treasurer; Andrea Houser, Corresponding Secretary and Adele Passmore, 
Publicity. 



Public Buildings Department 



The Public Buildings Department is responsible for maintaining all municipal 
buildings including schools. We are responsible for keeping all buildings 
safe for school children, school personnel, townspeople and town employees. 

The following are the highlights of some of the projects completed during 
1993. 

* A New England Telephone Centrex system was installed throughout the town 
departments and Town Hall. This will help cut costs and increase the 
efficiency of calls. 

* During the summer, all school buildings were prepared for a successful 
opening in September. 

* A new hot air furnace was installed in the Town Hall. This will ensure 
a more efficient operation during winter months. 

* A new handicap ramp was built in the rear of the Harnden Tavern. This 
will allow mobility impaired individuals to enter this historical site. 

* A computerized sign machine was 
purchased. We are now able to make 
up to 8" X 12" interior building 
signs to comply with A.D.A. laws. 
These signs will be with raised 
lettering and in braille. 

* Built new offices in the High School 
in order to move the Special 
Education Department from the 
Shawsheen School. 

* Voting machines were programmed and 
set up for all elections. 

I gratefully acknowledge the support of 
the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, town 
departments, school administration and 
especially all the employees of the Public 
Buildings Department for their continued 
help and co-operation in making 1993 a 
productive year. 




Paul White, Public Buildings Department, puts the finishing 
touches on air conditioning unit in the Town Clerk's new 
office. 



-56- 



Recreation Commission 



The Wilmington Recreation Department, in its 23rd year with a full-time 
Director, continued to meet new challenges while delivering a comprehensive 
slate of leisure opportunities for the citizens of Wilmington. 

Although the Recreation Department is relatively small, with only one full- 
time employee, it represents the second largest industry in the nation. In 
fact, Americans spend about 12 percent of their personal income on recreation. 

The Recreation Commission consists of five volunteer citizens appointed by the 
Town Manager. This board functions in a policy making and advisory capacity 
to the Director. 

The Recreation Commission and Director keep in mind the following departmental 
objectives as they plan and conduct recreation programs throughout the year: 

to provide opportunities for self-expression 

to develop a sense of personal worth 

to provide activities that allow for personal 

achievement and accomplishment 
to provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 
to provide physical activities which are new and 

different, offering a certain amount of challenge 

to participants 
to teach skills in various activities that will 

have carryover value in later life 
to provide a healthy and diversified program of 

recreation activities in an attempt to meet the 

needs and interests of the people being served. 

Our total funding comes from a variety of sources. User fees and donations 
heavily supplement the town funded budget which was decimated by the effects 
of Proposition 2 1/2 many years ago. Volunteers always play a key role in 
providing two dollars worth of service for every dollar spent. We also 
receive much help from local clubs and organizations. Some of these 
invaluable contributors are: Rotary, Lions Club, Kiwanis, Chamber of 
Commerce, Wilmington Town Employees Association, Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks, 
Police Association, Custodial Union, Sons of Italy, Ametek Employees Good 
Neighbor Fund, Analog Devices, Stelio's Restaurant, F & R Auto Supply, 
McDonald's, Burger King, Auxiliary Police, Camp Forty Acres, Re/Max Casalot, 
Miles AGFA, Pepsi Cola, Daywins Ice Creaun Parlor, DeMoulas, Textron, MASSBANK 
for Savings and Shriners. 

The Recreation Department is always 
involved, in varying degrees, with many 
recreation oriented groups. In this 
capacity we serve as a quasi-consulting 
agency. We also loan recreation equipment 
to families and groups of all types for 
various functions. We program use of the 
Shawsheen Tech pool for scout and other 
groups. We are a diverse information 
source and referral agency. 

Our basic programs are: Santa's Workshop, 
Horribles Parade, Elks Christmas Party for 
Special Kids, Christmas shopping trip to 
New York City, Spring trip to New York 
City, Basketball League, Men's Gym, 
Swimming Lessons, Swim-A-Cross , CPR, First 
Aid, Gymnastics, Aerobics, Cinema 
Discounts, other commercial recreation, 
Enterprise Discount Coupons, Sesame Street 
Live at Boston Garden, Special Needs 
Programs, Florida Discounts, T-Ball, 
Easter Egg Hunt, Circus Tickets at Boston 




"Costume Day" at Summer Playground 
Program. 



Garden, Bruins Tickets, Sunrnier Playground, 
Tiny Tots, Special Needs Day Camp, Public 
Beach Lifeguard Supervision, Canoe Rental 
and Clinic, Cranes Beach Sand Castle Day, 
Tennis Lessons, Concerts on the Common, 
Red Sox Trips, Fishing Derby, Co-Ed 
Volleyball, Disney on Ice Trip, Free Loan 
of Fishing, Canoeing, Disney, Soccer, 
Aerobics, Hawaii and other VCR Tapes, 
Police Association Beach Day, Easter 
Coloring Contest, Sale of Entertainment 
Discount Books, Special Needs Trips to the 
Shriners Rodeo and Circus, Sale of Greater 
Boston Discount Books, Ballroom and 
Country Western Dancing Lessons, Atlantic 
City Trips, Kinder Karate, Junior 
Basketball, Topsfield Fair Tickets, 
Rafting, Play Gym, Christmas Wreath 
Making, Big "E" Tickets, Sale of Ski 
Discount Books, Summer Youth Basketball 
League and Clinics, Connecticut Casino 
trips, Golf Lessons, Lake George Trip and 
Letters from Santa. 

Other groups that offer leisure type 
programs in Wilmington are: Little 
League, Elderly Services Department, Youth 
Hockey, Pop Warner, Figure Skating Club, 
Men's Softball, Square Dancing, Youth 
Soccer, Tennis Club, July 4th Committee, 
Community Schools, Council for the Arts, 
Scouts, Campfire and the Skating Rink. 
Schools and churches round out the active 
recreation picture. 




More fun with costumes at summer playground. 



There is an obvious lack of commercial recreation facilities in Wilmington, 
such as bowling centers and movie theaters. The town also lacks youth serving 
agencies such as YMCA's, YWCA's, Boys' and Girls' Clubs. This void stresses 
the importance for town support of this Department, especially now with a 
growing youth population. 




Past Commander of the Marine Corps League William Winnett 
pays tribute to veterans during Memorial Day ceremonies. 



Veterans' Services 



Veterans ' Services is governed by 
the General Laws of Massachusetts, 
Chapter 115, as amended, with strict 
compliance to this chapter, the 
rules and policies of which govern 
the disbursement of aid. 

Benefits are for the needy veteran 
and his immediate family who have 
been subject to unforeseen needs. 
Final approval of benefits comes 
from the Commissioner of Veterans' 
Services, Boston, MA. 

Total expended for aid to veterans 
and their families for the entire 
year was $15,605.75. The balance of 
the first six months of 1993 from 
previous appropriations was zero; 
total available funds beginning in 
July 1, 1993 was $15,000.00. 



-59- 




dollars not required to be expended for those who, because of circumstances, 
find it necessary to apply for aid. 



The Annual Report of the Memorial Library with its accompanying compilation of 
statistical information for 1993 is submitted herewith. 

The Library continued to fulfill its basic mission of providing access to 
educational, informational and recreational books and materials. 

Throughout the year the Board of Library Trustees reviewed all of their 
existing policy statements. All policies pertaining to use of the conference 
rooms, book selection, circulation policies, bulletin boards, and the 
Trustees' Rules and Regulations are current and up-to-date. The Trustees 
recorded the following in the minutes for their meeting on May 18, 1993: "The 
Board of Library Trustees, on the occasion of the retirement of Mrs. Barbara 
A, White, from the service of the Town of Wilmington and its Memorial Library 
following twenty-three years of service, wish to formally record their 
appreciation. Barbara White served as Circulation Librarian for over twenty- 
one years with distinction and to many townspeople personified the Library. 
During her tenure, Mrs. White saw the library evolve as a viable community 
resource and institution. The Trustees gratefully acknowledge her 
contribution to this sustained effort." Mrs. Laura Hodgson was appointed 
Circulation Librarian in September of 1993. 

The Trustees concluded their activities in 1993 by attending a meeting with 
the Board of Selectmen to discuss the Library and its role within the 
community. In response to a request by the Board of Selectmen, the Library 
now serves as a depository for the approved minutes of all town boards and 
commissions . 

The Library completed its sixth year as a member of the Merrimack Valley 
Library Consortium. The Consortium is a cooperative network consisting of 
twenty-six cities and towns within the Merrimack Valley; it continues to be a 
highly workable arrangement, and to be absolutely essential in providing 
Library service. Inter-library loans, sent and received, consume a 
significant portion of reference/circulation time in finding, ordering, and 
reserving material. Direct personal contact with the public has increased 
with the expansion of inter-library loan. More direct help is being provided. 
More frequent contact with other libraries within the consortium has proven 
beneficial. 



Library 




Wiminglon Memohai Ubcary. Middesex Avenue. 



-60- 



The library provided some of its conference room space to equip a "Job 
Resource Center" as part of the town's participation in the Small Cities 
Program. The Library subscribed to a newspaper devoted to issues and job 
listings in the public sector and in non-profit organizations. The Library 
strengthened its career and guidance materials, and added the Corporate 
Technology Directory to its holdings. For those interested in investments, 
the library added Morninqstar mutual fund information to its collection of 
business materials. 

"Active" tells the story of the Children's Department: students doing their 
assignments; children attending progreuns, at the computers, reading and 
checking out books; adults seeking information and reading suggestions; the 
staff of the Children's Department finding, helping, listening and planning. 
In response to community requests, a new program for parents and children 
together - "Time for Twos" - was launched successfully in the fall, and added 
to an already full calendar which included pre-school story hours, the "Sea 
Summer" Reading Program, and the year-end holiday celebration for pre- 
schoolers and their families. As always, the School Department's cooperation 
with the summer reading program was vital and appreciated. 

The Technical Services Department continued to operate with two full-time 
vacancies; however, additional part-time clerical hours enable the department 
to function. An upgrade called "Libs 100 plus" has made computerized data 
entry more efficient. This same upgrade has given more local control over the 
development of circulation policy. 

The Library wishes to acknowledge the services it received from a number of 
volunteers throughout the year. Mrs. Evelyn Pierce and Vasanth Venkatechalam 
in shelf reading and keeping the stacks in order; and Barbara Berry, Bonnie 
Murphy, and Sharon Winn who led some of the story hour groups. Greg Anderson 
shelved books throughout the year in the Children's Room; and Katie 
Deislinger, Jeff Farese, Meghan Gaudet, Jennifer Marsi, Kerie Sullivan, 
Kristen and Keri Ten Dyke and Parool Vaidya helped prepare for the summer 
program. Their services are appreciated. 

The Library continued to operate fifty-six hours weekly during the winter and 
forty-eight hours during the summer, and was open Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings until 9 p.m. Adecpjate funding, flexibility and staff dedication made 
this possible. The work of the entire staff is gratefully acknowledged and 
appreciated. 

The media frequently mentioned the explosion of informatioa and "Informational 
Highways" at the close of 1993. The Merrimack Valley Library Consortium will 
be part of INTERNET, and the Memorial Library will be able to access this 
worldwide network of computerized information early in 1994. The traditional 
role of the Wilmington Memorial Library, to provide the best access to books 
and materials possible, will remain unchanged. Every effort will continue to 
meet the educational, informational and recreational needs of the town and its 
citizens . 



Library Statistics for 1993 



Hours open each week 



( Summer ) 
(Winter) 



48 

56 



Acquisitions & Holdings 



Newspapers 
Periodical Titles 
Microf ilm/f iche Titles 
Museum Passes 
A/V Material 



11 
159 
27 
5 



2,250 



Number of volumes beginning 1993 
Number of volumes purchased during 1993 
Number of gifts added during 1993 
Number of volumes withdrawn during 1993 
Number of volumes at end of 1993 



84,813 
2,882 



921 



2,009 
86,607 



-61- 



circulation Activity 

a) Check-outs 

b) Check-ins 

c) Renewals 

d) Reserves placed 

e) Recalls requested 

f) Reciprocal borrowing statistics 

g) New patrons registered 

h) Patrons reregistered 

Circulation for 1993 
Circulation per capita based on 
Census of 18,141 

Retrospective Circulation 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 



142,614 
156,262 
7,048 
3,570 
458 
13,743 
881 
294 

149,662 

8.24 



113,683 
124,736 
127,782 
139,233 
147,499 
149,662 



Reference and Reader's Service Activity 

a) Inter-library loan requests to other 
libraries 

b) Inter-library loan requests received 
from other libraries 

c) Reference & Reader Services for 1993 



5,899 



7,844 
14,335 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 

The following is a summary of the inspections carried out from January 1, 1993 
through December 31, 1993 by the Sealer of Weights and Measures: 



Tested and sealed truck scales 6 
Tested and sealed scales under 100 lbs 

(supermarket type) 51 

Tested and sealed metric pharmacy weights 51 

Tested and sealed apothecary weights 52 

Tested and sealed gas meters 167 

Adjusted gas meters 20 

Tested and sealed oil truck meters 9 

Adjusted oil truck meters 3 
Inspections for sign postings and 

proper price markings 10 

Checked random items for proper weights 275 

Acted on complaints 3 
Inspection fees collected $2,448 



-62- 



Elderly Services Commission 



As in the past few years, 1993 continued to bring us many new residents age 60 
years and older. A large number of our new seniors arrived in Wilmington from 
other towns or cities, in and out of Massachusetts. Many of our residents 
reached the age of sixty in 1993. 

With the help of four part-time employees assisting the Director, Mary Harvey, 
Minibus Driver; Margaret Ready, Respite Care Servicer; two meals drivers; and 
a senior aide from Minuteman Home Care Corporation, we met the needs of all. 

Many titles are given to an older person, some refer to them as senior 
citizens, others elderly persons, then a golden ager, meaning the later years 
of a person's life are the golden years. Unfortunately for the majority of 
older persons, they fail to see those years as golden, with all the problems 
age brings with it. 

In 1993, adding to the normal problems that come with age such as: 
retirement, illness, financial problems, loss of a spouse or child, we 
received the problem of an elderly grandparent becoming a parent to 
grandchildren. 

With the economic condition of the country not improving enough to stop the 
layoff of employees, many of our seniors' children lost their jobs this year. 
Unable to support their family and pay the bills attached to owning a home, 
they came back to the parent with entire families. The changing role from a 
grandparent to a parent caune about in several ways. The majority of both 
parents had to take new, low paying jobs, working many hours a day. This left 
the grandparent in full charge of the grandchildren. Other children could not 
accept the stress with the changes, this lead to divorce. Again the 
grandparent had to be the parent to the children. One of the tragic cases 
brought to me was one of grandparents having to adopt two grandchildren being 
physically abused by their parents. We helped these grandparents as much as 
we could with the many services available to them. 

This year we received many more calls for financial help. Referrals were made 
to the Social Security Office for SSI, to the Welfare Office for food stamps. 
Aid to Dependent Children, Medicaid, to the Housing Authority for housing. 
Elderly Legal Services for legal assistance, CTI for fuel, Attorney General on 
elderly abuse. Mental Health for physical, mental and the new abuse this year, 
financial exploitation. 

Many counseling sessions were held on all the above-mentioned problems along 
with seniors trying to handle loneliness and depression caused through the 
death or the nursing home placement of a spouse. 

Visiting many homes this year we found many seniors depressed and despondent 
with no help, trying to cope with an ill, disabled spouse. Referrals were 
made to Minuteman Home Care for homemakers and to the Visiting Nurse 
Association for home health aides. We also found some seniors still over 
medicating themselves or over-indulging in alcohol. Referrals were made to 
North East Visiting Nurse Association and Mystic Valley Mental Health for 
help. We found others who were being financially exploited and mentally 
abused by feunily members, referrals were made to Protective Services. 

On the happier side of 1993, we were pleased with the increased number of 
seniors entering the Senior Center participating in our many activity classes: 
Art, Craft, Ceramic, Dance, Exercise, Nutrition, Wood-Working and our new 
Upholstering class. others came to intermingle with seniors at the Center 
through socialization at a therapeutic social, bingo, whist, game room, 
exercise machine room, or if only to join in conversation with a cup of coffee 
in the kitchen. 

Federal statistics this year stated senior citizens are becoming one of the 
fastest growing age groups in the country, especially those between 75-90. 
Our Respite Care Servicer has found this to be true. Entering so many senior 



-63- 



homes she has found seniors disabled and in advanced years living alone with 
no family member able to help them. She helped by transporting all to medical 
appointments, remaining with them, going from test to test then back to 
doctors for instructions, and having prescriptions filled. Others she 
comforted through their sorrows and loneliness after the loss of a spouse 
through death or nursing home placement. 




Members of the Upholstery Class at the Senior Citizen Center. 



Health seniors with no transportation available to them were able to be 
transported to medical appointments and other elderly related travel by the 
minibus . 

Our meals drivers were kept busy traveling 20,482 miles bringing hot meals to 
an average of 80-85 shut-in seniors each day. 

With the help of Analog Device, the Senior Fair contribution, and the Doucette 
family in memory of our senior, Evelyn Doucette, we made the holidays a little 
happier by delivering 300 catered dinners to homebound seniors. 

As Director of Elder Services I met the needs of our elder residents in 1993 
through Federal, State and Municipal branches of goverrunent . Those included 
Social Security office - problems with benefit checks. Medicare and SSI, 
Welfare Office problems with food stamps, Medicaid, and Aid to Dependent 
Children. I also contacted the Departments of Protective Services, 
Homemakers, Visiting Nurses, Mental Health, Day Care, Surplus Commodities, 
Attorney General, Legal Services, Fcunily Counseling, Elder Housing, Board of 
Health, Home Sharing and Share a Ride. 

In 1993 we received 6,472 telephone calls for services and information. 



Other services through the Elderly Services Department were: 

Transportation to medical and other elderly related travel 5,030 

Meals on Wheels to shut-ins 14,787 

Respite Care Services given to handicapped seniors 1,620 

Special holiday dinners to our homebound 480 
Applications for fuel, weatherization and oil burners 

replaced or repaired 161 

Total participation in all health and activity programs 22,690 

Kitchen Socialization throughout the year 9,982 

Surplus Commodities 288 



-64- 



To the following we extend our thanks for funds enabling us to deliver the 
above services: 



The taxpayers for approving our budget 
Community Teamwork (CTI) for accepting our 

applications for fuel 
Minuteman Home Care for homemakers, pre-screening 

for Day Care, prescreening for nursing homes, 

meals when our schools are closed, protective 

services, transportation to Boston hospitals 

and our Senior Aide. 
Executive Office of Elderly Affairs for accepting 

our grant. 

The seniors who organized a Senior Fair and all who 

worked hard making, selling and buying articles 

at the Fair. Earning enough money to purchase 

supplies for our woodworking, craft, cereimic 

and upholstering classes and to pay for three 

therapeutic socials and one holiday dinner to 

our homebound seniors. 
Mystic Valley Mental Health for depression and 

addiction abuse services. 
Northeast Visiting Nurse Association for in-home 

nursing services. 
Federal, State and Municipal departments: Town Hall, 

Public Works, Public Buildings, Police and School, 

for help when requested. 

We thank the Town Manager for his help and guidance and the following clubs 
for their donations to the senior citizens. 

Lions Club for their annual dinner dance 
Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks for their annual dinner dance 

and donations towards the rental of the hall for our 

therapeutic socials 
Kiwanis Club for their $30 monthly donations to the needy 

seniors and their annual shut-in dinner 
Rotary Club for their $50 monthly donation to needy 

seniors 

A thanks to all the many seniors who volunteered hundreds of hours, visiting 
seniors in their homes, hospitals and nursing homes, instructing weekly 
activity programs and those who worked on odd jobs at the center. 

To all who helped in any way in making the lives of the elderly residents of 
Wilmington more meaningful in 1993 we are very grateful. 




Wilmington Senior Citizen Center, School Street. 



$91,358 
$78,527 

$284,455 
$4,179 



$3,405 



-65- 



Commission on Disabilities 



The Wilmington CommiBsion on Disabilities (WCOD) deals with issues of concern 
to the disabled population of Wilmington. In the past year the WCOD has been 
attempting to secure a Xerox Imaging System Reading Edge reading machine to be 
housed in the Library. This machine will enrich the lives of the print 
impaired population to access the printed word. The machine translates the 
printed word into synthetic speech which is then spoken to the user. Standard 
books and other printed matter can be addressed with this machine. It 
promotes independent access to the printed word to the blind and other people 
unable to use a conventional book. The price of the machine is $5,495. We 
are about $2,000 short of the price at this time. We have approached the 
Lions Club and other organizations for donations for this purpose. We hope to 
reach the goal of having the appropriate money within the next year. Any 
assistance from other town organizations will be appreciated. 

We have been concerned with the Recreation Department. This department runs 
many trips. Many disabled people would like to participate in these trips. 
Unfortunately, a solution for these people has not been worked out. A meeting 
was held with the chairperson of this department. Unfortunately, data 
supplied to the Commission was inaccurate. A problem was cited regarding the 
fact that information relating to planned events was inaccurate and did not 
solve the problems of the disabled with regard to their successful 
participation in the progrcuns of this department. We hope to improve this 
situation for the future. The ADA Committee was also involved in this effort. 

We have also dealt with issues of housing and independent living situations 
for the disabled citizens of the town. We have assisted persons in 
investigating their options in this area. 

We have also dealt with issues of transportation. We would like to establish 
a shuttle service to some establishment in town. It would also be good to 
have accessible buses for the disabled community. This too could be a part of 
the Recreation Department's efforts mentioned above. We feel it is important 
that any contract dealing with transportation should have the language 
relating to the disabled as part of the contract. That means that accessible 
transportation be a part of any contract developed or offered. We will work 
with any department to make sure that such language and law is included in any 
contract. Under ADA law, any contract must provide for the disabled. 

We also keep current as to schools being accessible to the disabled. We keep 
current as to activities concerning ramps, access to floors in a building, 
classrooms and exits. We have a good relationship with the School Committee 
and the departments of education. We are also concerned for the disabled 
student population within the town that their needs are being met. 

We would request that some increase in our operating budget be addressed. 
While we realize money is tight, we do hope that some small increase in our 
operating budget could be forthcoming so we can provide more services as 
needed. 



-66- 



Board of Appeals 



APPLICANT 

Case 1-93 
Dennis & Laurie 
Robarge 

c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



Case 2-93 

Bob Ward 

124 Aldrich Rd. 



Case 3-93 

Aleppo Temple Shrine 
99 Fordham Rd. 



Case 4-93 
Presidential Dev. 
314 Main St. 



Case 5-93 
Daniel J. Noonan 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



Case 6-93 
Charles R. Taylor 
9 Grand St. 



Case 7-93 

John & Lisa Maher 

5 Westview Terr. 

Woburn 



REASON FOR APPEAL DECISION 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 

of the Zoning Bylaws to allow the 

existing dwelling to remain as situated 

within the front yard setback for property 

located at 58 Garden Avenue. (Assessor's Map 

54 Parcel 26A) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sionai Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot with insuffi- 
cient front yard setback on Winston Avenue 
and addition for property located on 124 
Aldrich Road. (Assessor's Map 9 Parcel 6) 

To acc[uire a special permit in accordance Granted 
with Sec. 4.1.9 (Fairs, Bazaars, Antique Shows 
and Carnivals) of the Zoning Bylaws for prop- 
erty located at 99 Fordham Road. (Assessor's 
Map 99 Parcel 135) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having insuffi- 
cient frontage for a single family dwelling 
for property located on 3 Russell Road. 
(Assessor's Map 36 Parcel 117 & 186) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Withdrawn 
with Sec. 3.3.2, 4.2, 8.3.2 and 8.5 of the 
Zoning Bylaws for an accessory apartment 
for property located at 1 Parker Street. 
(Assessor's Map 40 Parcel 139) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having insuffi- 
cient front yard setback on Norfolk Avenue 
for property located on 9 Grand Street. 
(Assessor's Map 32 Parcel 18) 

To accpjire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 and 

5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 

insufficient front and side yard setbacks for 

a single family dwelling for property located 

at Lot 7 Amherst Rd. (Assessor's Map 32 

Parcel 87A) 



Case 8-93 

Mutual Ben. Life Ins. 
31 St. James Ave. 
Boston 



Case 9-93 
Charles A. Landry 
103 Middlesex Ave. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 
with Sec. 6.6.6.1 and 6.6.6.4 (special 
permit Uses within the Ground Water Protec- 
tion District) for property located on 187 
Ballardvale Street. (Assessor's Map R2 
Parcel 20G) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 and 

5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws to allow the 

existing dwelling and garage to remain as 

situated on the lot for property located at 

103 Middlesex Ave. (Assessor's Map 52 

Parcel 25) 



-67- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 10-93 
Surface Coatings 
100 Eames St. 



Case 11-93 
Robert M. Crowe 
47 McDonald Rd. 



Case 12-93 
William S. Martin 
45 McDonald Rd. 



Case 13-93 
Mary Sharp 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acc[uire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.3.5 

of the Zoning Bylaws (Height of Buildings 

in Industrial Districts) for a steel stack 

to be installed on new odor and emission 

control equipment for property located at 

100 Eames St. (Assessor's Map 38 Parcel 4) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 

the Zoning Bylaws to allow the existing 

shed to remain in the side yard setback for 

property located on 47 McDonald Road. 

(Assessor's Map 84 Parcel 63A) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 

the Zoning Bylaws to allow the existing 

deck to remain in the side yard setback for 

property located at 45 McDonald Road. 

(Assessor's Map 84 Parcel 63) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 
5.2.2, 5.2.3, 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 of the 
Zoning Bylaws to allow an existing dwelling 
to remain as situated on a lot having insuffi- 
cient area, frontage, lot width, front, rear 
and side yard setbacks for property located at 
9 Larson Road. (Assessor's Map 104 Parcel 3) 



Cas 



14-93 



Originia Rlty Trust 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 and 
5.2.3 to construct a single family dwelling on 
a lot having insufficient area and lot width 
for property located at Lot 73A Ogunquit Rd. 
(Assessor's Map 50 Parcel 73) 



Granted 



Case 15-93 

Susan Scaro 

174 Burlington Ave. 



Case 16-93 
Originia Rlty Trust 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



Case 17-93 
Originia Rlty Trust 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



Case 18-93 

Craig D. Musicant 

149R Chestnut St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 6.1.2.2 (Changes, Extensions and 
Alterations) to change a single family 
dwelling back to a three-family dwelling for 
property located at 174 Burlington Ave. 
(Assessor's Map 17 Parcel 23) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2,1 and 
5.2.3 to construct a single family dwelling on 
a lot having insufficient area and lot width 
for property located at Lot 73B Ogunquit Rd. 
(Assessor's Map 50 Parcel 73) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 and 
5.2.3 to construct a single family dwelling on 
a lot having insufficient area and lot width 
for property located at Lot 73C Ogunquit Rd. 
(Assessor's Map 50 Parcel 73) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot with insuffi- 
cient rear yard setback for a shed for 
property located on 149R Chestnut St. 
(Assessor's Map 15 Parcel 15B) 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



-68- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 19-93 
Ruth Tkachuk 
124 Pond St. 



Case 20-93 

Paul Rogers 

13 Chapman Ave. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Withdrawn 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 of 

the Zoning Bylaws to divide a lot into 

two nonconforming lots, one with an existing 

dwelling and one lot with insufficient area 

for a single fautiily dwelling for property 

located at 124 Pond Street. (Assessor's 

Map 34 Parcel 137) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 

the Zoning Bylaws to allow an existing 

shed to remain as situated within the side 

yard setback for property located at 13 Chapman 

Ave. (Assessor's Map 94 Parcel 128) 



Case 21-93 To acquire a special permit in accordance 

Stelio's Fam. Rest. with Sec. 4.1 of the Zoning Bylaws 

144 Lowell St. (Accessory Use-Entertainment) for property 

located at 144 Lowell St. (Assessor's Map 

49 Parcel 2) 



Granted 



Case 22-93 
Christos Eliopoulos 
331 Main St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 4.1 (Accessory Use-Seating) for 
property located at 331 Main St. 
(Assessor's Map 42 Parcel 22E) 



Denied 



Case 23-93 

James V. Castellano 

39 Hopkins St. 



To acquire a special permit from Standard 
Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 3.3.2 
(Accessory Apartment) for property located at 
39 Hopkins St. (Assessor's Map 10 Parcel 3A) 



Granted 



Case 24-94 

James V. Castellano 

39 Hopkins St. 



Case 25-93 
Wayne Craig 
4 Allgrove Ln. 



Case 26-93 
Joseph M. Inzenga 
10 Lorin Dr. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws to allow the existing 
dwelling to remain as situated within the side 
yard setback for property located at 39 Hopkins 
St. (Assessor's Map 10 Parcel 3A) 

To acc[uire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient rear yard setback for a pool for 
property located at 4 Allgrove Lane. 
(Assessor's Map 86 Parcel 33) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 3.3.2 (Accessory Apartment) for 
property located at 10 Lorin Dr. (Assessor's 
Map 7 Parcel 70G) 



Granted 



Case 27-93 
Kenneth & Susanne 

Clarkin 
39 Reno Rd. 



Case 28-93 
James Tighe, Tr. 
c/o D. Brown 
11 Middlesex Ave. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for a deck for 
property located at 39 Reno Rd. (Assessor's 
Map 36 Parcel 95) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) to raze existing 

lot and construct a new single family dwelling 

on said lot having insufficient frontage, area, 

width and setbacks for property located at 4 

St. Paul St. (Assessor's Map 53 Parcel 28) 



-69- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 29-93 
4th of July 
Conunittee 

Case 30-93 
Richard A. Gore 
51 Salem St. 



To acquire a special permit for a Carnival for Granted 
the 4th of July Celebration from June 29 to 
July 4, 1993. (Assessor's Map 63 Parcel 10) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for an addition within the 
side yard setback for property located at 51 
Salem St. (Assessor's Map 70 Parcel 93) 



Case 31-93 

Michael Elia 

379 Middlesex Ave, 



Case 32-93 
Ruth Tkachuk 
c/o R. Scarano 
1147 Main St. 
Tewksbury 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 6.2.4 (Flood Plain District-Use) 
of the Zoning Bylaws for property 
located at 379 Middlesex Ave. (Assessor's 
Map 88 Parcel 13 & 14) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.1 of 
the Zoning Bylaws to allow the existing 
structure to remain less than 5 feet from the 
side yard, 12 feet from the street and 16 feet 
from the rear yard lot line and the area to 
remain 4,047 square feet for property located 
at 124 Pond Street. (Assessor's Map 34 Parcel 
137) 



Pending 



Denied 



Case 33-93 
John & Lorraine 

Waterman 
15 Mystic Ave. 



Case 34-93 
Robert DiPasquale 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



Case 35-93 
Bruce MacDonald 
P.O. Box 249 



Case 36-93 
Bruce MacDonald 
P.O. Box 249 



To acc[uire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning bylaws to allow the construc- 
tion of an addition within the side yard 
setback for property located at 15 Mystic 
Ave. (Assessor's Map 79 Parcel 39) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing a hcimmerhead lot for property 
located at 9 Englewood Dr. (Assessor's 
Map 58 Parcel 13) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Withdrawn 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 6 Fernbanks Rd. (#87-88) 
(Assessor's Map 15 Parcel 106) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Withdrawn 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 7 Fernbanks Rd. (#88-88) 
(Assessor's Map 15 Parcel 107) 



Case 37-93 
Bruce MacDonald 
P.O. Box 249 



Case 38-93 
Donald R. Jones 
2 3 Adams St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 9 Fernbanks Rd. (#86-88) 
(Assessor's Map 15 Parcel 109) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for an 
addition, no closer than the existing dwell- 
ing, for property located at 23 Adams St. 
(Assessor's Map 51 Parcel 47) 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



-70- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 39-93 

J. Kenneth Griffin 

396 Salem St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 6.1.2.2 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing an alteration/addition of a 
nonconforming structure for property located 
at 396 Salem St. (Assessor's Map 103 Parcel 
17) 



Granted 



Case 40-93 
Michael A. Alesse 
10 Cherry Tree Ln. 
Groveland 



To acquire a variance in accordance with 
Sec. 3.3.2 of the Zoning Bylaws 
(Dwelling Conversion) to re-establish a 
variance formerly Case 49-61 which allowed 
two apartments on the second floor of a 
building. Also, he is requesting two 
additional apartments on the first floor on 
a lot with 6,500 scjuare feet of land located 
at 106-112 Main St. and zoned Neighborhood 
Bus. (Assessor's Map 45 Parcel 141) 



Granted 



Case 41-93 
Earl Hupper 
58R Clark St, 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 1 Woburn St. (Assessor's 
Map 58 Parcel 19A) 



Granted 



Case 42-93 
Earl Hupper 
58R Clark St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 2 Woburn St. (Assessor's Map 
58 Parcel 19A) 



Granted 



Case 43-93 

Edward & Donna Adley 
9 Phillips Ave. 



Case 44-93 
Mark A. Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



Case 45-93 
Mark A. Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a variance in accordance with Granted 

Sec. 6.1.2 of the Zoning Bylaws to 

demolish an existing structure and to 

construct a single family dwelling on a lot 

having insufficient area, width, frontage and 

side yard setback for property located at 9 

Phillips Ave. (Assessor's Map 44 Parcel 84) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) of the 

Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.1 and 5.2.3 for a lot 

having insufficient area and lot width for a 

single family dwelling for property located 

at Lot 83A Plymouth Ave. (Assessor's Map 40 

Parcel 83 (A) ) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) of the 

Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.1 and 5.2.3 for a lot 

having insufficient area and lot width for a 

single family dwelling for property located 

at Lot 83B Plymouth Ave. (Assessor's Map 40 

Parcel 83 (B) ) 



Case 46-93 
Kevin Field 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.3 for a lot having 
insufficient lot width for a single family 
dwelling for property located on Lot 27 
Miller Rd. (Assessor's Map 54 Parcel 2 & 4) 



Granted 



-71- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 47-93 
John Crupi 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 
5.2.4 for a lot having insufficient area, 
frontage, width and front yard setback for 
a single family dwelling for property located 
at 8 McDonald Rd. (Assessor's Map 84 Parcel 
36) 



Granted 



Case 48-93 
John Crupi 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 
5.2.4 for a lot having insufficient area, 
frontage, width and front yard setback for 
a single family dwelling for property located 
at 8 McDonald Road. (Assessor's Map 84 Parcel 
36) 



Case 49-93 

James & Maria Assetta 
6 Walker St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 and 
5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot 
having insufficient front and side yard 
setbacks for a porch, no closer to the side 
yard lot line than the existing dwelling, for 
property located at 6 Walker St. (Assessor's 
Map 55 Parcel 238) 



Granted 



Case 50-93 
Comfort Foods 
223 Chestnut St. 
No. Andover 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 3.6.5 of the Zoning Bylaws 
(Limited Manufacturing-packaging, sales and 
marketing of products to retail stores) in 
conjunction with small factory store for 
property located at 892 Main St. (Assessor's 
Map 24 Parcel 3 ID) 



Granted 



Case 51-93 
John Maffei 
3 Newbern Ave. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for a garage 
and deck for property located at 3 Newbern Ave, 
(Assessor's Map 32 Parcel 24) 



Granted 



Case 52-93 
Mark A. Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located at 274 Middlesex Ave. (Assessor's 
Map 79 Parcel 4) 



Case 53-94 
Michael Stuart 
14 Oakland St. 
Lowell 



To acc[uire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located on Presidential Dr. (Assessor's Map 
18 Parcel 8S) 



Withdrawn 



Case 54-93 

Rocco V. DePasqualt 

45 Adams St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 

with Sec. 4.1 of the Zoning Bylaws, 

Accessory Use-Entertainment) Karaoke, Singalong 

Music and piano, Friday and Saturday nights from 

9 p.m. to 1 a.m. and special Holiday occasions 

for property located at 193 Main St. 

(Assessor's Map 44 Parcel 5) 



-72- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 55-93 
Michael Peters 
5 Bradford Rd. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for a deck for 
property located at 5 Bradford St. 
(Assessor's Map 35 Parcel 66) 



Granted 



Case 56-93 
Donald E. Gorski 
96 Nichols St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for a garage 
and to allow the existing dwelling to remain 
as situated on a lot having two frontages for 
property located at 96 Nichols St. 
(Assessor's Map 36 Parcel 60) 



Case 57-93 
Peter S. Gould 
29 Dorchester St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having 
insufficient rear yard setback for a deck 
for property located at 29 Dorchester St. 
(Assessor's Map 11 Parcel 25A) 



Case 58-93 
Domenic Saraceno 
92 Harrison Ave. 
Woburn 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 6.3.5.3 to authorize a 
freestanding sign 22 feet high and an addi- 
tional sign of 95 square feet for property 
located at 603 Main St. (Assessor's Map 41 
Parcel 138A) 



Granted 



Case 59-93 

Kevin P. McCluskey 

34 Manet Rd. 

Newton 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws for a lot having insufficient 
rear yard setback for a deck for property 
located at 11 Somerville Ave. (Assessor's 
Map 9 Parcel 63B) 



Granted 



Case 60-93 
Leonard & Carol 

Colometo 
4 Somerville Ave. 



To accpjire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient rear yard setback for a deck 
for property located at 4 Somerville Ave. 
(Assessor's Map 9 Parcel 77) 



Granted 



Case 61-93 
Laurie M. Gold 
121 Nichols St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws for a lot having insufficient 
side yard setback for a shed for property 
located at 121 Nichols St. (Assessor's Map 
36 Parcel 85) 



Granted 



Case 62-93 
Presidential Dev. 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located on Lot 41 Kansas Rd. (Assessor's 
Map 36 Parcel 117, 186, 135, 136) 



Granted 



Case 63-93 
John M. Martens 
c/o D. Brown 
P.O. Box 426 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 and 
5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient area and 
lot width for a single family dwelling on 
property located at Lot 67B Plymouth Ave. 
(Assessor's Map 40 Parcel 67B) 



Granted 



-73- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 64-93 
George Gagnon 
c/o D. Brown 
P.O. Box 426 



To acc[uire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 
5.2.2, 5.2.3 of the Zoning Bylaws for 
a lot with less than required area, width, 
frontage and depth for property located at 
120-128 Buckingham St. (Assessor's Map 9 
Parcel 74) 



Granted 



Case 65-93 
Carl Crupi 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
for a hammerhead lot for property located 
on Shawsheen Ave. (Lot 6B) (Assessor's 
Map 23 Parcel 6) 



Case 66-93 
Carl Crupi 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
for a hammerhead lot for property located 
on Shawsheen Ave. (Lot 6C) (Assessor's 
Map 23 Parcel 6) 



Case 67-93 
Edward F. Shea 
773 Salem St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 6.1.2.1 (Changes, exten- 
sions and alterations) for property located 
at 773 Salem St. (Assessor's Map Rl Parcel 
23) 



Granted 



Case 68-93 

Leroy P. Reynolds 

20 Oxbow Dr. 



To appeal the Building Inspectors decision 
and to acquire a variance from Standard 
Dimensional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws, to allow the existing 
pool to remain no less than 20 feet from the 
front yard setback for property located at 
20 Oxbow Dr. (Assessor's Map 47 Parcel 32) 



Granted 



Case 69-93 
Carolyn C. Wood 
18 Mystic Ave. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 3.3.2 Accessory Apartments and 
4.2 Conditions of the Zoning Bylaws 
for property located at 18 Mystic Ave. 
(Assessor's Map 78 Parcel 1) 



Granted 



Case 70-93 

Arthur Morin 

11 Redwood Terr, 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws to allow the existing pool and 
cabana to remain as situated within the rear 
and side yard setbacks for property located 
at 11 Redwood Terr. (Assessor's Map 59 Parcel 
47) 



Granted 



Case 71-93 
Frederick Jarvis 
3 New Hampshire Rd. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.4 for a lot having 
insufficient front yard setbacks (2 frontages) 
for a swimming pool for property located at 
3 New Hampshire Rd. (Assessor's Map 36 Parcel 
139A) 



Case 72-93 
Timothy Aucella 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 6.1.2.2 authorizing an 
addition to a nonconforming structure for 
property located at 9 Larson Rd. (Assessor's 
Map 104 Parcel 3) 



-74- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 73-93 

Paul S. Fitzpatrick 

31 Cary St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the Zoning 
Bylaws Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insuffi- 
cient side and rear yard setbacks for a shed 
for property located at 31 Cary Street. 
(Assessor's Map 67 Parcel 75B) 



Granted 



Case 74-94 
Philip G. Santoro 
16 Fox Run Dr. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for a garage 
for property located at 16 Fox Run Dr. 
(Assessor's Map 96 Parcel 112) 



Granted 



Case 75-93 
Gary Phillips 
23 Lloyd Rd. 



To appeal the decision of the Building 
Inspector for a variance from Standard 
Dimensional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.5 to allow the 
existing shed to remain within the rear yard 
setback for property located at 23 Lloyd Rd. 
(Assessor's Map 55 Parcel 168A) 



Case 76-93 
Richard G. Cole 
48 Marion St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.3 for a lot having 
insufficient width for a single family 
dwelling for property located on Marion St. 
(Assessor's Map 5 Parcel 1) 



Granted 



Case 77-93 

Virginia & Mark Fields 
8 Cedar St. 



To acquire a variance to allow the existing 
dwelling to remain as situated on the lot 
and for an addition on a lot with insufficient 
front and side yard setbacks for property 
located at 8 Cedar St. (Assessor's Map 30 
Parcel 22) 



Granted 



Case 78-93 

Susan Stryke 

15 South Bedford St, 

Burlington 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws for a 
hammerhead lot for property located at 10 
Allgrove Lane. (Assessor's Map 86 Parcel 
36) 



Granted 



Case 79-93 
Michael A. Pelosi 
60 McDonald Rd. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 
to allow the existing dwelling to remain as 
situated on a lot having insufficient area, 
width and frontage for property located at 
60 McDonald Road. (Assessor's Map 84 Parcel 
56B) 



Granted 



Case 80-93 
Delores Lord 
c/o D. Brown 
P.O. Box 426 



To acc[uire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 
to allow an existing dwelling to remain on 
a lot having insufficient area, width and 
setback for property located at Lot A Forest St. 
(Assessor's Map 7 Parcel 32) 



Granted 



Case 81-93 
Delores Lord 
c/o D. Brown 
P.O. Box 426 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws, Sec. 5.2.1 and 5.2.3 for a lot 
having insufficient area and width for a 
single family dwelling for property located 
at Lot B Swan Rd. (Assessor's Map 7 Parcel 
32) 



Granted 



-75- 



APPLICANT 

Case 82-93 
Randy McDaniels 
Precision Bldrs. 
Brighton 



Case 83-93 

Ralph E. Newhouse 

299 Main St. 



Case 84-93 

Ralph E. Newhouse 

299 Main St. 



REASON FOR APPEAL DECISION 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws, Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having 
insufficient rear yard setback for a deck 
for property located at 1 Somerville Ave. 
(Assessor's Map 9 Parcel 72A) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) of the 

Zoning Bylaws, Sec. 5.2.5 to allow the existing 

dwelling and pool to remain as situated on a 

lot having insufficient side yard setback for 

property located at 281 Woburn St. 

(Assessor's Map 86 Parcel lOB) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) of the 

Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.1 and 5.2.3 for a lot 

having insufficient area and width for a single 

family dwelling for property located on Lot 2 

Allgrove Lane. (Assessor's Map 86 Parcel lOB) 



Case 85-93 

Edward & Darlene Bard 
4 Appletree Lane 



Case 86-93 
Mark Lopez 
5 Crystal Rd. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.5 to allow an existing 
deck to remain on a lot having insufficient 
rear yard setback for property located at 4 
Appletree Lane. (Assessor's Map 29 Parcel 23) 

To acc[uire a special permit from Sec. 6.1.2 
of the Zoning Bylaws to demolish and 
reconstruct a residential dwelling on a lot 
in a General Industrial zone and to remain as 
situated on a lot along with a business 
(veterinary clinic) for property located at 
15 Burlington Avenue. (Assessor's Map 30 
Parcel 12) 



Granted 



Case 87-93 

Barry W. Fiorenza 

363 Middlesex Ave. 



Case 88-93 
Originia Realty Tr. 
c/o D. Brown 
P.O. Box 426 



Case 89-93 
Earl St Patricia 

Ellsworth 
c/o D. Brown 
P.O Box 426 



To appeal the decision of the Building Pending 
Inspector, to allow benches and tables on the 
exterior of a building or premise in a General 
Industrial Zone for property located at 363 
Middlesex Avenue. (Assessor's Map 79 Parcel 
29) 

To acc[uire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) of the 

Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3, 

5.2.4 and 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient 

area, width, frontage and setbacks for a 

single feunily dwelling for property located 

on Lincoln Avenue. (Assessor's Map 7 Parcel 

33) 

To acc[uire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) of the 

Zoning Bylaws, Sec. 5.2.3 for a lot having 

insufficient width for an existing single 

family dwelling for property located at 45 

Forest Street. (Assessor's Map 7 Parcel pt 

of 30B) 



-76- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 90-93 
Earl St Patricia 

Ellsworth 
c/o D. Brown 
P.O. Box 426 



Case 91-93 
Earl & Patricia 

Ellsworth 
c/o D. Brown 
P.O. Box 426 



Case 92-93 
William Cooke 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



Case 93-93 
Originia Rlty Trust 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



Case 94-93 
Thomas Rlty Trust 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) of the 

Zoning Bylaws, Sec. 5.2.1 and 5.2.3 for a 

lot having insufficient area and width for 

a single feunily dwelling for property located 

on Lot 2 Lincoln Avenue. (Assessor's Map 7 

Parcel pt of 30B) 

To acqoiire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) of the 

Zoning Bylaws, Sec. 5.2.1 and 5.2.3 for a 

lot having insufficient area and width for 

a single fcimily dwelling for property located 

on Lot 3 Lincoln Avenue. (Assessor's Map 7 

Parcel pt of 30B) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Pending 

sional Regulations (Table II) of the 

Zoning Bylaws, Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 

for a lot having insufficient area, frontage 

and width for a single family dwelling for 

property located on Albany Street. 

(Assessor's Map 11 Parcel 28) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) of the 

Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.2 for a lot having 

insufficient frontage for a single family 

dwelling for property located on Parker 

Street and Ogunquit Road. (Assessor's Map 

50 Parcel 73) 

To acquire a comprehensive permit pursuant Granted 
to M.G.L. Chapter 40B, to obtain zoning 
relief in order to construct a 23, possibly 
24, lot affordable housing development under 
the Commonwealth's Executive Office of 
Communities and Development's Local Initia- 
tive Program. Six of the 23 homes are to be 
marketed to families of low or moderate 
incomes for property located in Buckingham 
Estates. (Assessor's Map 9 Parcel 67D & Map 
10 Parcels 8, 11, 14, 12, 15, 17, 16, 24 and 
26) 



2Case 95-93 
Frank Silveira 
9 Hathaway Road 



Case 96-93 
ETM Rlty Trust 
c/o D. Brown 
P.O. Box 426 



Case 97-93 

Michael G. Castellano 
296 Shawsheen Avenue 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) of the 

Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot with 

insufficient side yard setback for a shed 

for property located at 9 Hathaway Road. 

(Assessor's Map 94 Parcel 78) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having 
insufficient front yard setback for a single 
feunily dwelling for property located on 
Concord Street. (Assessor's Map 78 Parcel 4) 

To appeal the decision of the Building Pending 
Inspector, to allow two existing tables to 
remain inside my store for property located 
at 296 Shawsheen Avenue. (Assessor's Map 22 
Parcel 19) 



-77- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 98-93 
Robert DiPasquale 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 

Case 99-93 

Richard E. Gustafson 
50 Washington Ave. 



Case 100-93 

Mark. & Diane Conserva 

c/o D. Brown 

P.O. Box 426 



Amended Decision 34-93 - Change: 5. The Amended 
applicant shall pave no more than 25 feet 
of his required 40 feet of frontage. 
(Assessor's Map 58 Parcel 13) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
Zoning Bylaws for a lot with insuffi- 
cient side yard setback for a garage for 
property located at 50 Washington Avenue. 
(Assessor's Map 43 Parcel 131) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 

5.2.2, 5.2.3, 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 of the 

Zoning Bylaws for a lot with insufficient 

area, width, frontage and setbacks for a 

single family dwelling for property located 

on Virginia Road. (Assessor's Map 104 

Parcel 8) 



Case 101-93 
Ametek Aerospace 
c/o C. Tsiotos 
424 Broadway 
Somerville 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 6.2 of the Zoning Bylaws, 
(Flood Plain District) for property located 
at 50 Fordham Road. (Assessor's Map 99 
Parcel 1 & Map 91 Parcel 131) 



Case 102-93 
Lawrence & Deborah 

Mclssaac 
2 Adelman Road 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot with insuffi- 
cient side yard setback for a pool for 
property located at 2 Adelman Road. 
(Assessor's Map 83 Parcel 27) 



Granted 



Case 103-93 
Michael L. Russo 
16A Fairfield Road 



To appeal the decision of the Building 
Inspector and for a variance from Standard 
Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 
5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws to allow an 
existing shed to remain as situated within 
the side yard setback for property located 
at 16A Fairfield Road. (Assessor's Map 55 
Parcel 160) 



Withdrawn 



Case 104-93 
John R. Forrest 
207 Aldrich Road 



Case 105-93 

Michael P. & Paula A. 

Dolan 
13 Auburn Avenue 



Case 106-93 

Peter M. Minichiello 

16 Hobson Avenue 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.3 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot with insuffi- 
cient width for new construction for 
property located at 180 Lowell Street. 
(Assessor's Map 72 Parcel lA) 

To accjuire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot with insuffi- 
cient side yard setback for a garage for 
property located at 13 Auburn Avenue. 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 and 

5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws to allow the 

existing dwelling to remain as situated 

within the side and front yard setbacks for 

property located at 16 Hobson Avenue. 

(Assessor's Map 45 Parcel 3) 



-78- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 107-93 
Charles, Emily & 

Charlen Landry 
105 Middlesex Avenue 



Case 108-93 

M. Barbara Sullivan 

27 Gunderson Road 



Case 109-93 
Anna M. Cosco 
77 Edge lawn Ave. 
No. Andover 



Case 110-93 
Barbara MacDonald 
c/o D. Brown 
P.O. Box 426 



Case 111-93 
Joseph & Darlene Ray 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



Case 112-92 

Kim MacDonald-Wilson 

9 Jordan Street 



Case 113-92 
John & Patricia 

McNaughton 
15 Marie Drive 



Case 114-93 
Charles Cochrane 
197 Federal Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

aional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 

the Zoning Bylaws to allow the existing 

garage to remain as situated within the side 

yard setback for property located on 105 

Middlesex Avenue. (Assessor's Map 52 Parcel 

24) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
eional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having insuffi- 
cient rear yard setback for a shed for 
property located at 27 Gunderson Road. 
(Assessor's Map 94 Parcel 46) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 

with Sec. 6.1 (Nonconforming Uses and 

Structures) of the Zoning Bylaws to 

demolish an existing dwelling and rebuild a 

dwelling in a General Industrial Zone, on a 

lot having insufficient area, front and rear 

yard setback for property located at 959 

Main Street. (Assessor's Map 12 Parcel 4) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Withdrawn 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 

5.2.2, 5.2.3, 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 of the 

Zoning Bylaws for a lot having insufficient 

frontage, area, width and setbacks for property 

located on Adelman Road. (Assessor's Map 83 

Parcel pt 32) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 

5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 for a lot having 

insufficient area, frontage, lot width and 

front yard setback for property located on 

Olmstead Avenue. (Assessor's Map 32 Parcels 

51,52 & pt 53) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 and 

5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot with 

insufficient front and side yard setbacks 

for a porch and to allow the existing dwelling 

to remain as situated on a nonconforming, 

pre-existing lot for property located at 9 

Jordan Street. (Assessor's Map 70 Parcel 84) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a proposed sub- 
division of a lot, the existing having 20,000 
square feet of area and leaving a lot having 
15,695 square feet, insufficient area for a 
single family dwelling for property located at 
15 Marie Drive. (Assessor's Map 102 Parcel 37 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaw to 
authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located at 197 Federal Street. (Assessor's 
Map 60 Parcel 41) 



-79- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 115-93 
Edward J. Moran 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws to allow the existing 
dwelling to remain as situated within the 
side yard setback for property located at 15 
Chapman Avenue. (Assessor's Map 94 Parcel 83) 



Granted 



Case 116-93 
Jacques & Christine 

Haurey 
12 Gowing Road 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot with insuffi- 
cient side yard setback for a two-car 
garage for property located at 12 Gowing Road. 
(Assessor's Map 92 Parcel 8) 



Granted 



case 117-93 
Kenneth & Patricia 
Lyon 

63 Andover Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 of 
the Zoning Bylaws to allow the existing 
shed to remain as situated within the front 
yard setback and for an addition within the 
front yard setback for property located at 63 
Andover Street. (Assessor's Map 103 Parcel 
123) 



Case 118-93 
Americo Enos 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws to allow the existing 
dwelling, pool and shed to remain as situated 
within the side and rear yard setbacks for 
property located at 6 New Hampshire Road. 
(Assessor's Map 35 Parcel 51A) 



Granted 



Case 119-93 
Leo W. Campbell 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 
5.2.2 and 5.2.3 of the Zoning Bylaws 
for a lot having insufficient area, frontage, 
and lot width for a single feunily dwelling 
for property located at Brattle Street. 
(Assessor's Map 54 Parcel 14) 



Case 120-93 
Leo W. Campbell 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 
5.2.2 and 5.2.3 of the Zoning Bylaws 
for a lot having insufficient area, frontage, 
and lot width for a single family dwelling for 
property located at Brattle Street. 
(Assessor's Map 54 Parcel 14) 



Granted 



Case 121-93 
Doherty-Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



Case 122-93 

Joseph & June Cataldo 

18 Blanchard Road 



Case 123-93 
George Riel 
9 Somerville Avenue 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located on Burlington Avenue. (Assessor's 
Map 17 Parcel 18) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.3 of 
the Zoning Bylaws, for a lot having 
insufficient width for a single fcimily 
dwelling for property located at Blanchard 
Road. (Assessor's Map 20 Parcel 18) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws, for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for a deck 
for property located at 9 Somerville Avenue, 
(Assessor's Map 9 Parcel 63A) 



Granted 



Granted 



-80- 



APPLICANT 



REASON FOR APPEAL 



DECISION 



Case 124-93 
Matthew Barrett 
Sting Ray Performance 
155 Village Street 
Marblehead 



To acquire a special permit from Sec. 3.5.15 
(Auto Repair & Body Shop) to repair and 
maintain motorcycle, snowmobile and other 
small engines, personal use and small 
recreational vehicles for property located 
at 845R Woburn Street. (Assessor's Map 37 
Parcel 6) 



Case 125-93 
L.A. Assoc. Inc. 
314 Main Street 



Case 125-93 
L.A. Assoc. Inc. 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.3.2 of 

the Zoning Bylaws (pre-existing lot) to 

construct a single family dwelling on a 

lot having insufficient area and depth for 

property located on Lot A Avon Street. 

(Assessor's Map 9 Parcel 33) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 

5.2.2 and 5.2.3 of the Zoning Bylaws 

for a lot having insufficient area, width 

and frontage for a single family dwelling 

for property located at Lot 1 Denault Drive. 

(Assessor's Map 48 Parcel 30 & 32) 



Case 127-93 
L.A. Assoc. Inc. 
314 Main Street 



To acc[uire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 and 
5.2.2 of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot 
having insufficient area and frontage for a 
single family dwelling for property located 
at Lot 2 Denault Drive. (Assessor's Map 48 
Parcel 30 & 32) 



Case 128-93 

Frank Valletta 

25 Lexington Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having insuffi- 
cient side yard setback for an addition 
for property located at 25 Lexington Street. 
(Assessor's Map 69 Parcel 73E) 



Withdrawn 



Case 129-93 
Mark Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Section 6.1.2.2 of the Zoning 
Bylaws to allow the continuance of a non- 
conforming use on a lot having insufficient 
area, frontage, lot width and front yard 
setbacks for property located at 86 Lowell 
Street. (Assessor's Map 40 Parcel 158) 



Granted 



Case 130-93 
Mark Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Section 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
for a hammerhead lot for property located 
at Lot 7 Marion Street. (Assessor's Map 5 
Parcel IG & 2 ) 



Granted 



Case 131-93 
Mark Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
14 Main Street 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Section 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
for a hammerhead lot for property located 
at Lot 8 Marion Street. (Assessor's Map 5 
Parcel IG & 2) 



Granted 



Case S-1-93 
Michael Swanson 
4 Elizabeth Avenue 
Burlington 



To construct a road not shown or made part 
of the Official Map (General Law, Chapter 41, 
Section 81E) on a way known as 7 Canyon St. 
(Assessor's Map 16 Parcel 63A) 



Granted 



-81- 



Council for the Arts 



The Town of Wilmington was enriched culturally and intellectually in the year of 
1993 through the efforts of its Arts Council who presented numerous informative 
and enjoyable programs at the Arts Center. Concerts, painting and watercolor 
demonstrations, art exhibitions, art classes, lectures, a historical presentation 
and bus trips to museums were sponsored by the Council and enthusiastically 
welcomed by the townspeople. 

The Wilmington Council is, in part, supported by the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council (formerly the Massachusetts Lottery Council), whose purpose is to raise 
funds to be used for community arts. Their objective is to promote cultural 
resources, to ensure the continued contribution of these resources to local 
communities and to involve as many citizens as possible in some aspect of 
cultural activity. Wilmington now receives only one annual monetary allocation 
from the Massachusetts Council rather than two as in the past, resulting in 
grants being accepted for only the fall cycle. PASS (Performing Students Series 
Program) was approved, as were grants to three other applicants. 

The Thirteenth Annual Art Exhibition held on Saturday and Sunday, June 26 and 27, 
1993 was again an outstanding success. This is now a traditional feature of our 
Fourth of July celebration in Wilmington. Dorothy Richards won the John D. 
Brooks award, which is given to the Wilmington artist who has shown the most 
progress in his/her work. 

In Photography, Kathy Chabel won First Prize for her innovative "The Beach As I 
Found It II," Bryan S. Borgal received Second Prize and Celia Cornish Third. 
In Watercolor, First Prize went to Louise Anderson (a teacher at the art classes 
sponsored by the Council) for her "Twin Lights Gloucester," Second Prize to Diana 
Pasquariello and Third Prize to Evelyn Andersen, former Art Director in the 
Wilmington Schools. 

In Oil, First Prize was awarded to Leda Sullivan for her "Oriental Still Life," 
Second Prize went to Mary A. Saija and Third Prize to Rita Stynes-Strow. 

In Pastel, Dorothy Richards received First Prize for her "Reflections on Boston" 
— a lovely rendering of the Massachusetts State House. (It may be noted that 
the Arts Council purchased this for its permanent collection.) In this medium, 
Dora Hirtle won Second Prize. Works shown by students who have taken advantage 
of the Art Center's classes were submitted and First Prize was won by Jane Crane, 
Second Prize by Ruth Myers Laider and Third Prize by Anne Buzzell. A charming 
addition to this year's show, although not juried, was an exhibition of 
Children's Art with young artists from 7 to 12 years of age. A display of 
Beginners' Pottery was beautifully arranged by Adele Passmore who is the 
instructor for these two classes. 

Three distinguished artists judged the show. 

ELEANOR MAHONEY who has a Studio in Reading and a gallery in Kennebunkport , 
Maine. She is the recipient of many national awards. 

ROBERTA THRESHER former Director of Art, Reading Public Schools. Her awards at 
many juried shows have been numerous; she is a member of many art associations. 

BETTE WASSERBOEHR of Andover is a graduate of the New England School of Art and 
the Museum School, Boston. Her paintings, which have won numerous awards at 
important exhibitions, have been acquired by collectors in this country and 
abroad. 

A lovely feature of spring in Wilmington was a piano and organ concert titled, 
"Music In The Air" given on Sunday afternoon. May 16. Three talented musicians 
provided the SRO audience with a delightful program: Maybelle Bliss at the piano 
and Aloha Jaynes and Carolyn Stanhope at the organ. On Sunday, November 28 a 
holiday concert again brought out a SRO audience who were richly rewarded with 
a great program. Mrs. Bliss was at the piano, Mrs. Jaynes at the organ and 
Carolyn Stanhope as Mistress of Ceremonies, an assignment which she performs with 



-82- 



tremendous vivacity and humor. Two lectures, historical in content, were given 
at the center, one on May 26 by Sidney A. Dimond of Needham with his 
impersonation of a Town Crier in the Town of Boston 200 years ago and one in 
September by Martha Chaiarchiaro of the Worcester Art Museum entitled "Women 
Artists Through the Ages." Her lecture was a retrospective of Judith Leyster's 
work, the most famous woman artist of the Dutch seventeenth century. Her lecture 
prompted members of the Art Council to visit the Worcester Art Museum to view the 
exhibition of Leyster's work. 

On February 6, 1993, demonstrations by five artists were presented simultaneously 
at the Center: 

Claire Batley of Reading, a graphics designer, Gertrude Dobbins of Reading, a 
watercolorist and calligrapher , Elery Shaw of Wilmington, demonstrating the 
unique art of Japanese Bunka Shi-Shu, Joan O'Hearn of Wilmington demonstrating 
the art of tole painting and James White of Wilmington demonstrating wood 
carving. 

On November 10 a demonstration by the well-known television and courtroom artist, 
Constance Flavell Pratt, was enthusiastically received with Ms. Pratt ending her 
presentation doing a portrait study of two Council members: Edith Michelson and 
David Maison. 

An innovative "First" at the Arts Center was held on October 15 in the evening. 
Live jazz by the Ross Warner Octet was presented in a coffeehouse setting with 
coffee and refreshments served. It was a complete success. 

Classes for both children and adults were again sponsored and well attended. 

On August 16 Elizabeth White, Chairperson of the Council appeared before the 
Board of Selectmen along with Council members to present an overview of the 
Council's purpose and activities. 

The assistance provided by town departments is appreciated. Roger Lessard and 
Bob Palmer and their workers are willing and generous in their support. We thank 
them all. 

Officers of the Council for the Arts are: Elizabeth White, Chairperson; Edith 
Michelson, Vice Chairman; Anne Buzzell, Treasurer; Dan Ballou, Sr., Recording 
Secretary; and Frances Keough, Publicity/Corresponding Secretary. 



The Council is grateful for the support of the people of Wilmington, 
of Selectmen and the Town Manager. 



the Board 




Courtroom Artist Constance Pratt presents a demonstration for the Wilmington Council for the Arts. 



-83- 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council 



Throughout the year, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) has been 
representing the interests of communities in the region on a number of critical 
planning issues. In August, MAPC initiated a public information process for 
review and comment on the Regional Transportation Plan, a long-range planning 
document that lays out future transportation investments in the region. Working 
within the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) structure, along with five 
other agencies, MAPC participated in the development of the Plan, mandated by the 
ISTEA (Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act) federal legislation. 
MAPC's involvement in the Regional Transportation Plan led to a final draft that 
was reflective of local needs. 

Other transportation planning initiatives that MAPC participated in on behalf of 
its communities include coordinating local review of aunendments to the TIP 
(Transportation Improvement Program); the State Implementation Plan (SIP) for Air 
Quality; and the Program for Mass Transportation (PMT). 

MAPC also participated in the federally required reclassification of local roads, 
hosted an informational forum on the SIP; coordinated and solicited 
Transportation Demand Management (TDM) and transportation enhancement project 
development and funding; and participated in an electric vehicle pilot progreun 
to demonstrate the viability of alternative fuel vehicles in Massachusetts. 

As the lead agency for the development of the Overall Economic Development 
Program (OEDP) for the region, MAPC brought together local officials and the 
region's business community to develop the OEDP priorities. In January, the 
Economic Development Administration (EDA) approved MAPC's OEDP cjualifying the 
projects contained in it for public works grants from the EDA. During the year, 
OEDP project funding by the EDA totaled $1.8 million. 

MAPC's Data Center continued to develop and disseminate information on the 
communities in the region. Last year the center developed a 1990 census profile 
of sample data for each community in the region; surveyed and compiled an 
inventory of vacant industrial and commercial sites for each community in the 
region; and developed from the 1990 census, journey to work data and population 
and age group forecasts for each community. The Center also provided Wilmington 
with data extracts from the 1990 census. 

MAPC's 1993 administrative support to the NSPC (North Suburban Planning Council) 
of which Wilmington is a member, focused on facilitating communications between 
the Massachusetts Highway Department and the NSPC in the design of the Industri- 
Plex Interchange to allow for easterly access; review and discussion of the 
Regional Transportation Plan and review and response to MetroGreen, the land 
resources protection element of MetroPlan 2000. MAPC staff also developed a work 
program to guide these discussions. 

Last year, MAPC also presented the North Suburban Water Supply Protection Plan 
at a public information meeting sponsored by the Wilmington League of Women 
Voters. The 1992 plan provides a comprehensive and regional approach for the 
protection of municipal drinking water supplies in eight north suburban 
communities. 



-84- 



Department of Public Works 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby 
respectfully submit the Annual Report on the activities of the Wilmington 
Department of Public Works for the year 1993. 

The divisions of the Department of Public Works are: Highway, Tree, Cemetery, 
Parks & Grounds, Engineering, Water & Sewer, and non-recyclable and recyclable 
solid waste disposal. The coordinating of all the activities of all divisions 
allows the town the optimum use of manpower, equipment and materials which 
control costs. 

Highway Division (658-4481) 

All regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as 
sweeping streets, installing street and warning signs, patching streets, 
cleaning catch basins, cutting brush along the roadsides, picking up trash 
along our roadsides, painting and replacing guardrails, repairing broken 
curbing, painting safety lines and crosswalks on streets, etc. 

Chapter 90 Improvements; Finish course of hot top was applied on Chestnut 
Street, Hillside Way and Butters Row. A binder course and finish course was 
applied to the following streets: Beacon Street, Columbia Street, Fairview 
Avenue, State Street, Winchell Road, Burnap Street, Cross Street, Dorchester 
Street, Nichols Street, Oak Street, Cunningham Street, Royal Street, Glen Road 
from Middlesex Avenue to Rte. 38, Harnden Street from Glen Road to Rte. 38, 
Gandalf Way from Glen Road to end, Clorinda Road, from Agostino Drive to end. 
No. Washington Avenue from Clark Street to Stone Street, School Street, 
Pineview Road and Cobolt Street. 

Binder course only was applied on the following streets, the finish course 
will be applied in the spring: West Street from Woburn Street to Westdale 
Avenue, Middlesex Avenue from Town Common to Rte. 38. 

Drainage; Drainage systems and culverts were installed, repaired or extended 
at the following locations: Ballardvale Street, Phillips Avenue, Brand 
Avenue, Kilmarnock Street, Aldrich Road, Chestnut Street at Marion Street, 
Cornell Place, Chestnut Street at Hillside Way, Manning Street, Dell Drive, 
Molloy Road, Middlesex Avenue at School Street, Bridge Lane, Roosevelt Road, 
Forest Street, Auburn Avenue, MacDonald Road and Carmel Street. 

Snow & Ice Removal: The 
Highway Division 
recorded 98.5" of snow. 
Snow and ice removal is 
a very expensive and 
major function of the 
Department of Public 
Works in trying to keep 
our roads free from ice 
and snow and as safe as 
possible during the 
winter months. 




Wilmington plows working on Burlington Avenue. 



-85- 



TREE DIVISION (658-2809) 



The Tree Division carried out all regular maintenance work such as trimming, 
cutting, spraying and tree removal. We removed 28 roadside trees that were 
dead or interfered with public safety. Hornet nests were removed upon request 
from residents. The Town Common was illuminated again this year with a fine 
display of Christmas lights. 

Dutch Elm Disease; We removed 1 Dutch Elm diseased tree. 

Moscmito Control; The Town is a member of the Central Massachusetts Mosquito 
Control Project. With this regional approach we are able to provide our town 
with good, environmentally sound and cost effective mosquito control. The 
three basic mosquito control methods are source reduction, larviciding and 
adulticiding. 

CEMETERY DIVISION (658-3901) 

All regular maintenance work was carried out throughout the year, such as 
mowing grass, weeding, trimming, resetting grave markers, foundations for 
monuments were poured, etc. 

Burials 

Died in Wilmington 19 
Died Elsewhere 52 
Non-Residents 37 
Cremations 22 

Infants 1 

131 

Reserve 

Sale of Lots $29,356.00 

Total 

Parks & Grounds Division (658-4481) 

All regular maintenance was carried out throughout the year such as cutting 
grass, trimming shrubs, marking ballfields for baseball, softball, football, 
field hockey and soccer. Also, all fields and parks were fertilized. 

The girls softball field at the High School was constructed with sod, an 
irrigation system and is about 90% completed. The field will be completed in 
the spring. 

ENGINEERING DIVISION (658-4499) 

The Engineering Division assisted town departments, boards and commissions 
with engineering related projects, such as, but not limited to; 

Highway Division - With solution to drainage problems and other engineering 
related work. 

Planning Board - Subdivisions - Reviewed subdivision plans and made 
recommendations to the Planning Board and inspected subdivision roadway 
construction. 

Household Rubbish Collection. Disposal And Recycling (658-4481) 

The responsibility for overseeing the contract for household rubbish and 
recycling is a function of the Department of Public Works. If homeowners have 
any questions or complaints, please call the above number. 

In August, the town implemented a townwide residential curbside recycling 
program. The Recycling Committee is pleased with the acceptance by the 
homeowners of this program. 



Receipts 

Interments $28,775.00 

Foundations for $2,678.33 

monuments 

Affidavits $8.00 

Copy of Deeds $91.00 
$31,552.33 

Trust Fund 

Perpetual Care $28,652.00 
$89,560.33 



-86- 



Water & Sewer Division (658-4711) 



Water; The Salem Street and Butters Row #2 gravel packed wells were cleaned 
and rehabilitated. The wells were taken off line and surged with chemicals to 
remove deposits which inhibit pumping capacity. Inspection of the pump at 
Butters Row #2 indicated the need for replacement which will be done in 1994. 

The granular activated carbon (GAC) was replaced at the Sargent Water 
Treatment Plant. This material serves as the filter media used to remove 
impurities from the municipal water supply. 

The computerized process monitoring and control system was designed for 
installation at the Butters Row Water Treatment Plant. This system will 
improve efficiency by allowing department personnel to operate and monitor the 
Sargent Water Treatment Plant remotely. The installation of the system will 
be performed during 1994. 

The cross connection control program which protects the water system from 
contamination from private uses was administered. All existing devices were 
tested twice in accordance with DEP regulations. Additionally all 
industrial/commercial facilities were surveyed in accordance with DEP 
regulations. The results yielded 328 violations and 110 existing devices of 
which the department was unaware. Property owners were notified of steps 
necessary to bring their facilities into compliance. 

A lead and copper testing program was performed in accordance with DEP 
regulations. Sixty homes as well as public buildings were tested. Eight 
residential properties were found to exceed federal limits for lead. The 
source of this lead is not from the public water supply. In general, it is 
introduced into the water of the individual home by lead based solder in the 
plumbing of the property. Notification was provided to all property owners as 
well as steps which can be taken to minimize risks. Additionally, a desk-top 
corrosion control study was performed. The study recommended an increase in 
lime at the treatment plants. Accordingly, the lime dosage was increased 
after concurrence from DEP. 

Work on the water audit/ leak detection survey progressed. The leak detection 
survey was completed. It located 20 minor leaks on services and hydrants 
which were immediately repaired. Initial inspection of meters of industrial 
users was conducted. Industrial meters will be tested in 1994. 

An annual flushing progrsun was performed on the entire water system during 
May. Routine maintenance was performed on the water system as necessary. 
Additionally, department personnel responded to water main breaks and service 
leaks as necessary. 

The water rate was increased in June of 1993 from $2.56 per 100 cubic feet to 
$2.83. This 10% increase was due primarily to increase in debt in the fiscal 
year 1994 budget. 

Sewer; The MWRA assessment for fiscal year 1994 was initially projected to 
increase from $1,270,854 to $1,525,025. As a result the sewer rate was 
increased in June of 1993 from $4.27 per 100 cubic feet of water consumption 
to $4.53. However, the MWRA was awarded $19,009,850 from the Commonwealth 
Sewer Relief Fund for fiscal year 1994. Wilmington's assessment was thereby 
reduced to $1,347,656. As a result, the Water & Sewer Commission reduced the 
rate to $4.27 in September of 1993 

Pumping Statistics; 

Maximum Gallons Per Day 
Maximum Gallons Per Week 
Maximum Gallons Per Month 
Average Gallons Per Day 
Average Gallons Per Month 
Total Gallons Per Year (Treated) 
Total Gallons Per Year (Raw) 



4,487, 100 
26,093,960 
105,988,160 
2,482,781 
75,516,699 
902,916,800 
1,026,300,500 



-87- 



Precipitation Statistics; 

Annual Rain Fall (Inches) 
Annual Snow Fall (Inches) 




Sidewalk plow working on Grove Avenue after snowstorm in March of 1993. 



Consumption Statistics: 




Residential Use (Gallons)* 


435,005,000 


Percentage of Total Pumped 


48% 


Industrial Use (Gallons) 


312,800,000 


Percentage of Total Pumped 


35% 


Total Metered Use (Gallons) 


747,805,000 


Percentage of Total Pumped 


83% 


Unaccounted for Use (Gallons)** 


155,111,800 


Percentage of Total Pumped 


17% 



* Residential use includes all residences and small commercial users using 
5/8 inch meters. 

** The difference between water pumped and water metered represents 

unaccounted for water use and consists of water used for flushing mains, 
main breaks, fighting fires, street sweeping, etc. 

Water Distribution System; 

The following new water mains were constructed in 1993; 



Location Length Size Hydrants 

Treasure Hill Road 760' 8" 2 

Allgrove Lane 670' 8" 2 

Denault Drive 230' 8" 1 

Fiorenza Drive 4,000' 8" 7 

Seaford Street 180' 8" 1 

Madison Road 300' 8" 1 

Marion Street Ext. 950' 8" 2 

Fernbank Road 550' 8" 2 

Oakridge Circle Ext. 350' 6" 1 

Salem Street 320' 8" 1 

Ogunquit Road 250' 8" 1 

Cunningham Street 300' 12" 1 

Blueberry Lane 500' 8" 1 

Sarafina Way 400' 8" 1 



-88- 



Total water mains installed in 1993 were 350 feet of 6 inch, 9,110 feet of 8 
inch, and 300 feet of 12 inch. There were 24 hydrants installed in 108 
services. 



Sewerage Collection System; 



The following new sewer laterals were constructed in 1993: 



Location 



Length 



Size 



Bridge Lane 
Pouliot Place 



520' 
820' 



8" 
8" 



Total sewer laterals installed in 1993 were 1,340 feet of 8 inch gravity. 
There were 21 services connected to the system. 

In concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
Police Department for keeping us informed during the winter months of the road 
conditions, between the hours of 3:00 p.m. and 6:30 a.m. weekdays, weekends 
and holidays and all various departments for their cooperation extended during 
the year. I would like to thank the Town Manager, the Assistant Town Manager 
and the Board of Selectmen for their support throughout the year. Last, but 
not least, the employees of the Department of Public Works who made 1993 a 
very productive year, my sincere thanks and appreciation. 



-89- 



Wilmington Public Schools 



WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Again this year, Wilmington High School was proud to send a majority of its 
graduates to further education. The High School Guidance Department processed 
hundreds of applications to both four year and two year colleges. Acceptances 
to higher education included Merrimack College, Stonehill College, Notre Dame 
University, Westfield State College, Bentley College and a one of a kind 
program at Boston University. The High School Scholarship Program, through 
its generous contributions, awarded over $65,000 in financial assistance to 
the graduates. All of the proceedings could not have happened without an 
enormous amount of time given by the Guidance Department and its Department 
Head, Mrs. Florence Athanasia. 

In 1993, the focus of the Massachusetts Legislators' initiative was to reform 
the educational process and to provide a public education system of sufficient 
quality to extend to all children the opportunity to reach full potential and 
to lead lives as participants in the political and social life of the 
Commonwealth and as contributors to its economy. The reform bill also 
establishes school councils dealing with all aspects of their respective 
schools such as budgeting, school funding, school climate, etc. Hopefully, 
school reform will be accompanied by sufficient funding to carry through the 
aggressive initiatives for which reform calls. 

Under the stewardship of the Superintendent of Schools, curriculum upgrading 
is underway. Revisions in the math and science curricula are now in progress, 
with others to follow. When completed, the mathematics curriculum will 
reflect the newly revised standards of the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics. At the end of this year, a prominent member of the Math 
Department, Mr. Francis P. Kelley, will be retiring after thirty-seven years 
of dedicated service to the children of Wilmington. 

The Science Department 
is upgrading its 
curriculum offerings to 
reflect national 
standards for science 
education as proposed by 
the National Science 
Teachers Association and 
Project 2061. As a 
result of Mr. Richard 
DeRosa's selection to 
attend the NASA Program 
and Goddard Space Flight 
Center in Maryland this 
summer, NASA continues 
to provide his 
department with space 
science and astronomy 
materials. He was also 
certified to receive the 
lunar rocks for viewing 
in early spring. Mr. 
DeRosa also attended the 
launch of the Space 
Shuttle Mission STS-61 
(Endeavor) - The Hubble 
Repair Mission. 

The Social Studies 
Department has continued 
to offer a program that 
prepares well informed 
citizens capable of 
successfully 
participating in a 




Wilmington High School Band mar.- - Parade. 



-90- 



complex, diverse world. While the core curriculum remains the Seune, the 
teachers continue professional development while awaiting curriculum review in 
early spring. 

Our English Department is continually emphasizing the teaching of writing. In 
addition to enrollment in a year long English course, students are encouraged 
to participate in a summer reading program and enroll in a SAT verbal review 
course that reviews test taking procedures and prepares students for the 
exams. Also, a member of the English Department, Mr. Matthew Joyce, has been 
piloting a prograun in the development of student speaking skills in the 
English classroom as well as in Science, Social Studies and Foreign Language. 
He is again working with the AP class to present an evening of student 
performances for the community. 

Our library continues to offer all the services provided in the public library 
as well as library skills training despite the loss of the library's 
educational assistant. We are fortunate to have a senior citizen from 
Minuteman Home Care helping out for twenty hours a week. 

Through the generosity of the Wilmington voters, the High School purchased 
twelve new Macintosh computers for the new computer lab. This allows faculty 
to introduce students to the latest in software applicable to their subject 
area. When you pass the High School notice the new satellite dish on the 
roof. This is the new distance learning satellite known as M-CET. This 
provides our students the capability to access programs not offered in the 
regular daily scheduling. These programs could originate at other high 
schools or anywhere in the country. The satellite provides modem capabilities 
for students to interact with other students miles away to discuss problem 
solving ideas related to a given question. The Wilmington Fire Department has 
copied programs aired on M-CET for use in training new firefighters. With our 
budgetary restraints more apparent, the above type of instruction could become 
a substitute for the actual teacher. 

Last spring, the girls' softball teeun distinguished themselves by becoming 
State Champions for Division II. 

The High School is committed to providing its students the best possible 
educational opportunities. Through continued curriculum revision, by 
providing a safe atmosphere and professional development, we are helping your 
child to pursue his/her dreams. Your continued support for your High School 
will help us to reach these goals and is greatly appreciated. 

NORTH AND WEST INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS 

The Massachusetts Education Reform Act provides for a comprehensive 
strengthening of local school system leadership for school improvement. At 
the West Intermediate School, this educational issue enhances our stated 
philosophy that all children are capable of learning. We continue to strive 
toward providing an educational atmosphere that is focused, responsive and 
accountable to the adolescent child's welfare and academic needs. 




-91- 




West Intermediate School students visit Ellis Island. 



Each staff member continues to perform in an atmosphere of cooperation through 
staff development, teaun meetings and our newest component, the school council. 
The school council involves and requires parent and public commitment for 
better understanding, a more focused curriculum and greater attention paid to 
this very exciting and very important student population. A major goal of our 
school is to increase the participation of parents and the community in 
formulating their child's middle school experience. 

Although we cannot diminish the impact that limited resources and continued 
personnel cuts have had on our academic programs, we have as a school 
community reaffirmed our primary obligation to provide for each individual. 
Performance standards, self-assessment, curriculum review and an increased 
awareness of our growing technological needs still remain at the forefront of 
our schools. New directions in health education and the development of our 
media centers have highlighted a most productive year. Curriculum materials 
in grades 6-8 science and grade 6 reading have provided both schools with 
resources to meet national curriculum standards. The broadening of our most 
successful cooperative educational model has enhanced the inclusion of our 
special educational students. 

The recent loss of teachers in home economics, industrial arts and computer 
technology has diminished our middle school exploratory curriculum. We look 
forward to the future funding of these positions and programs. 



-92- 



SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 



The Shawsheen Elementary School children, parents and teachers continue to 
show pride in their school and the programs offered to the children. The 
mission of the school is to create an exciting and challenging learning 
environment — one that will nurture the full range of knowledge, traditions and 
values of a multi-cultural society and one that will enable each child to 
develop the self-esteem, critical and creative skills, and personal and social 
management skills needed to live in a constantly changing world. 




Halloween at the Shawsheen School. 



The Parent Advisory Committee presents to the children a program rich in 
diversity. It is their objective to present something each month in the 
manner of enrichment programs to be offered during the school day or after 
school for the entire family. The cooperative efforts of our Parent Advisory 
Council and its members have provided assistance to our teachers in the form 
of mini-grants and enrichment assembly programs for our students in the areas 
of language arts, music, science, and nutrition. We acknowledge the fact that 
parents are our partners in education and appreciate the immeasurable ways in 
which they assist, advise, and support our efforts. 

Many of our teachers are actively participating in the development of new 
curricula in the areas of math, science, social studies and language arts. 
All of these areas will have new goals, standards and expectations for student 
achievement by the end of this school year. In addition to new curricula, 
committees have been formed to make plans for long range school development 
that includes curriculum and school growth in the community. 

In response to the Education Reform Act of 1993, a School Council has been 
formed to assist the principal in setting goals for the school, identifying 
students' educational needs, reviewing the school building's budget, and 
preparing the school improvement plan. 

The Shawsheen School faces many changes as it moves towards the 21st century. 
We are presently the largest school in the community, serving over 700 
children in kindergarten through the fifth grade. We continue to offer a wide 
range of services to our children in the area of Fine Arts, Physical 
Education, Library Sciences, and Special Education. 

As is the case in many suburban communities, growth is happening all through 
our school district. New streets with new houses are being developed all 
around us. The need to expand classroom space and services to children is of 
paramount importance to Wilmington if we are to continue offering a quality 
education to all of our children. 



-93- 



WILDWOOD SCHOOL 




The "Pencil Machine 



The Wildwood Elementary School 
enrollment has continued to increase 
once again this year. At the 
present time, 369 students are 
attending our school. The staff 
continues to provide the students 
with an exciting educational 
program. 

During the month of December, the 
students of the Wildwood School 
began a year long reading incentive 
program. The theme selected this 
year was for students to work toward 
"Becoming A Noble Reader." After 
reading at home, the students chart 
their progress at school as they 
attempt to become a King/Queen. 

Through the efforts of many parents, 
a publishing center has been 
established at the school. After 
receiving training from Maureen 
White and workshops offered by 
several Wildwood teachers, parents 
have begun to serve as writing 
coaches in some classrooms. The 
parents have been trained to 
conference with the boys and girls 
and assist them with expanding their 
ideas in written communication. 
These parents have also received 
training with the specific software 
used at our school so they are able 
to assist the students with using 
the computer. 



To encourage writing, this group of volunteers makes many different shaped 
mini-books which the students enjoy. 

After the passage of the Education Reform Law, a school council was created at 
the Wildwood School. The following parents and staff were elected to the 
council for the first year: 



Chairman: 
Co-chairman: 
Teachers: 
Parents: 

Community 
Leaders: 



Robert J. Arsenault, Principal 
Roger Maderia 

Anna Kilfoyle, Gerald LaPointe 

Mrs. Gail Ollila, Mrs. Marjie Brenton, 

Mrs. Susan Leverone, Mr. Steven Brander 



Mr 



Lester White, Mrs. Anne Marie Brennick 



The council has been examining the budget process and has started to make 
recommendations regarding by-laws. 

The students in grades four and five continue to serve as reading buddies for 
the first grade students. They enjoy the weekly reading sessions with the 
first grade students and this has been a worthwhile experience for both groups 
of students. 

We have expanded our inclusionary model to support those students needing 
academic assistance. Our reading specialist, resource room teacher, and 
educational assistant support the boys and girls in the classrooms rather than 
having the students leave their classrooms for a separate program. 



-94- 



Once again our fifth grade 
students began the year with a 
special week long 
environmental experience at 
Nature's Classroom. The 
students enjoyed the many 
learning opportunities which 
were offered to them. 

The Silver Burdett & Ginn 
Reading Program which was 
adopted for grades 1-4 has 
been phased into the fifth 
grade. The students are 
improving their reading with 
this program which was a 
combination phonics and whole 
language approach to teaching 
reading. Also, several 
multiple copies of novels have 
been purchased to supplement 
the reading progrcim along with 
the many authentic pieces of 
literature which the students' 
texts provide. 

The Parent Advisory Council 
continues to work closely with 
the teachers, students, and 
administration of the Wildwood 
School. The PAC continues to 
offer many faunily activities for the Wildwood community. In addition to the 
several events, the PAC sponsors a six week long after school program and the 
following enrichment progreuns: 

"History of Song/Dance/Music" - Brian Gillis 

"Little Theatre of the Deaf" - Performance with Sign Language 

and Voice 

Author and Illustrator - Michael Glasser 
"Indian In The Cupboard" - Actors Theatre of Maine 
"Mr. Wizard" - Science Assembly Program 
"Krackerjack Theatre" - Stories from Planet Earth 

The generous donation of a copier and supplies made by the PAC to the school 
has been put to good use. 

WOBURN STREET SCHOOL 

One of the on-going goals of the Woburn Street Elementary School is to build 
bridges to the community. 

One bridge that was built last year involved one of our Art teachers and the 
fifth grade students. The boys and girls made the Valentine season more 
meaningful to the patients at the Veteran's Hospital in Bedford by writing 
them beautiful messages that were delivered to the hospital. 

This year during the holiday season, fourth grade students began what we 
believe and hope will be a long relationship with the residents of Wilmington 
Woods Nursing Home. "A Christmas Carol" by Dickens was presented to the 
residents by the children. The children's performance was followed by 
caroling and a delightful luncheon. 

The Woburn Street School students and their families donated to the home a CD 
player and a number of tapes. 

When the good weather arrives, the fourth graders will be sharing additional 
outings with the Wilmington Woods residents. 




Wildwood School students get ready for FUN. 



-95- 



The Whole Language Teachers' Association, a very prestigious group, recently 
awarded a Teacher Study Group Grant to the Woburn Street School for their 
proposal. Expanding Whole Language/Experience Teaching. Ms. Anne Field, one 
of our kindergarten teachers, submitted the proposal to the WTA. This was 
highly competitive and many school systems submitted proposals. 

The focus of the Teacher Study Group is to meet on a monthly basis and share 
ideas and discuss relevant issues and concerns around the whole language 
philosophy. The teachers plan to share their findings at the May 4th teacher 
in-service day for the Wilmington School System. 

Teachers from our Special Education Department and a kindergarten teacher from 
our school represented the Wilmington School Department as field based 
researchers at the Expanded Kindergarten Conference sponsored by Lesley 
College on November 18, 19, 20. These teachers were selected as a part of a 
25 member team of educators throughout the state. 

The Woburn Street School 
teachers will also be 
responsible for administering 
a survey on inclusionary 
practices in the Wilmington 
schools. They will share 
their data at a follow-up 
meeting in February with other 
members of the research group. 



The Woburn Street School 
Enrichment Committee was 
awarded $415 by the 
Massachusetts Cultural 
Council. These grant funds 
were used for the Creative 
Writing Workshop with 
Children's Author, Deborah 
Gould. Ms. Gould worked with 
students on the writing 
process throughout the month 
of October. It was a very 
successful and enjoyable 
experience for the children 
and also for the Woburn Street 
staff. 

In November, over 70 fifth 
grade students embarked on a 
field trip which took them to 
Nature's Classroom in Andover, 
Connecticut. During that week 
they were involved in a very 

... unique education program. 

^^^^^^^^^ Some the highlights 

/^^^^^^^^V included how environmental 

impact our lives and 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ are related to mathematics, 
Wob c cc.ochool student TiaMarden takes part in the sack race during the coupling of social science 
Field Day. and language arts skills. The 

goals to be arrived at in 
presenting the natural 
environment were first to 
impart knowledge of nature; 
secondly, to the wonders that are found therein. The third was to motivate 
the students to seek further information about their own natural habitats. In 
addition, teamwork was the hallmark of the week long program; children working 
with each other on different and exciting projects to reach successful 
conclusions. The end result being that when they returned to the school they 
would continue to work together to achieve and join in a common goal of 
pursuit of knowledge. 



-96- 



Winchester Family Medical Center donated $500 to those needy students so that 
they could also enjoy the benefits of the trip. The Woburn Street School is 
deeply appreciative of their financial kindness. 

The third grade boys and girls 
have been busily engaged in 
working .with computers on 
locations of public buildings, 
churches and notable 
landmarks. One of the third 
grade classes made posters and 
models of these landmarks. 
They were on display at the 
Harnden Tavern for the 
Strawberry Festival. A video 
presentation was aired on 
local cable Channel WCTV. 

In December, three members of 
Wilmington Company of 
Minutemen visited two third 
grade rooms. These gentlemen 
explained in detail the role 
of Wilmington patriots during 
the American Revolution to the 
students and showed them a 
musket. They came in full 
dress and the boys and girls 
were duly impressed. 

PERFORMING AND FINE ARTS 

During the last calendar year, 
the Performing and Fine Arts 
Department continued to serve 
all students in art and music 
classes in grades 1-8 as well 
as offering growing numbers of 
talented students in grades 9- 
12 the opportunity to enroll 
in Art, Photography, Band and 
Chorus. The Instrumental 

Program in grades 3-12 flourished and we took pride in the increased 
enrollments at all levels, of particular note, the String Program grew to 150 
members. 




Building for the future — Sherilyn Rose, Kindergarten student at 
the Wobum Street School. 



School and civic exhibits and concerts were numerous and well received. 
Elementary school students participated successfully in several poster, 
slogan, and calendar contests while five of our high school students won Gold 
Keys, Silver Keys, and Honorable Mention in the Globe Scholastic Art Show. 
High school chorus and band members were selected for Northeast District and 
All-State Festivals. 



The department participated in the Fulbright Teacher Exchange and hosted a 
music teacher from England who taught at the Shawsheen School as his 
counterpart from Wilmington assumed his position abroad. It was a most 
interesting and productive exchange. 

1993 also brought an astounding number of requests for student performances 
and exhibits at home and away and students and staff were able to honor all of 
them. Meanwhile, 1993 was also a big year for fund raising — success again 
with kudos to organizations, industries, business firms, parents and friends. 
The band parents raised an astounding amount of money to purchase needed 
ecjuipment, music, and NEW UNIFORMS 1 Every one of their activities was a labor 
of love and we are greatly indebted to them. 



-97- 



The band also received an invitation to march in the St. Patrick's Day Parade 
in Washington, D.C. in 1994. If approved, we will march in our nation's 
capital proudly bearing the banner "Wilmington Wildcat Band - Wilmington, 
Massachusetts . " 

So it is as we look back on 1993, we can say truly, "It was a very good year." 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

During the last calendar year the Special Education Department received 164 
referrals for initial TEAM evaluations and provided special education and 
related treatment services to approximately 475 special needs students ages 3- 
22. 

The Special Education Department continues to work closely with the principals 
and staff at all six schools to continue implementing and expanding 
Wilmington's cooperative teaching program between special education and 
regular education teachers. The focus of Wilmington's three year investment 
in the cooperative teaching process is to enhance mainstreaming and inclusion 
opportunities for special needs students in the regular education program. 

The overall goal of the department this year was to significantly expand the 
number of regular classrooms in which cooperative teaching took place. With 
the active involvement and support of Dr. Geraldine O'Donnell, Superintendent 
of Schools, reading teachers were reallocated to provide additional staffing 
to achieve the enhanced mainstreauning objective. Each building principal 
worked with the Special Education Department and the Superintendent to develop 
a specific building based plan for the expansion of cooperative teaching 
classrooms in each school. The comparative systemwide date between the 1992- 
1993 and 1993-1994 school year are as follows: 

92-93 93-94 

Special Services Staff Participating 13 28 

Regular Education Staff Participating 18 65 

Special Education Students Involved 88 359 

Reduction of Take Out Service Hours 584.75 



The Special Education Department has also written, and been awarded, a grant 
from the Department of Education to provide after school compensation for 
teachers who are involved in the cooperative teaching process. Both regular 
education and special education teachers are compensated for the after school 
planning time required to make cooperative teaching a successful reality for 
all students. 

In conclusion, the Special Education Department, with the support of the 
Superintendent of Schools, building principals, and regular classroom teachers 
has restructured many special education services from take-out resource room 
settings to inclusive regular classrooms. 

SCHOOL FOODSERVICE DEPARTMENT 

The Wilmington School Foodservice Department has been very active and busy 
this year. Along with serving approximately 240,000 student meals and 14,000 
senior citizen lunches, we have been catering many activities. Our services 
have been called on to prepare, serve or supervise the National Honor Society 
Banquet, Music Department Awards Dinner, PAC Spaghetti Suppers and Breakfasts, 
and Pop Warner Dinner and many coffee hours and meetings. 

The staff has had an opportunity to participate in training programs presented 
by Massachusetts School Foodservice Association and the Bureau of School 
Nutrition Services, Department of Education. 

We will be participating once again in Framingham State College's graduate 
intern program by having a student intern study under Wilmington's School 
Foodservice Program. We are always enriched by the experience and it keeps us 
on our toes. 



-98- 



We are hoping for increased student lunch participation as well as senior 
citizen participation. We are retaining our status as a self-supporting 
department within the school department under very difficult economic times. 
It is increasingly difficult to continue this self-supporting status. We are 
being careful with food and supplies to conserve as much as possible and 
trying every possible means we can think of to increase lunch participation 
and catering services. 

After working hard on marketing our progreun and increasing participation, we 
were awarded the USDA "Best Practices Award" in marketing and participation in 
October for the Northeast Region of the country. We are very proud of the 
award, as it involves a great deal of conscientious hard work by the school 
foodservice staff. The staff is dedicated to providing the best, nutritious 
lunch possible to the students in Wilmington schools. We believe we serve a 
great lunch at a reasonable price. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

The Physical Education Department continued to serve all students (K-12), as 
well as providing an adaptive program for students with special needs. The 
program sponsors a physical education "Mile Club" to encourage physical 
fitness in grades 5 through 8. 

The health program in grades K-5, under the direction of Mrs. Laura Stinson, 
has incorporated "Project Charlie" into the curriculum. In grade 5, we offer 
the DARE prograun, in cooperation with the Wilmington Police Department and 
Officer James White. These programs emphasize the importance of drug/alcohol 
education through the teaching of self-esteem, responsibility and decision 
making. 

The Physical Education Department cited several students for outstanding 
achievement in physical education: 

1993 - Lori DeAmato and Derek Fullerton 

1994 - Luanna DiSarra and Jonathan White 

1995 - Mary Amata and Nick Montalto 

1996 - Laurie Johnson and William Dineen 

Athletic Awards - 1993 

Dr. Gerald Fagan Award - "To The Outstanding Athlete" 
Adrienne Fay and Tommy Aprile 

Lawrence H. Gushing Award - "To The Senior Athlete Demonstrating Both 
Scholarship and Sportsmanship" 

Lynette Berger (Sacred Heart College) and Tom Killilea (Colby College) 

Harold "Ding" Driscoll Award - "To The Senior With The Most Dedication To 
Sports" 

Keri Bowlby (Springfield College) and Tom Zaya 

George Spanos Award - "For Contribution And Service to W.H.S. Athletics" 
Edwin "Jake" Townsend 

Alumni Award - Recognizes former outstanding student-athletes who have gone on 
and continued to demonstrate their commitment to excellence . 
Jason Bere (Class of '89) Chicago White Sox 

Top "10" Awards - Senior athletes who academically finish in the Top "10" of 
his/her class: 

Rank 



1 Leah Mazzoni (U. Mass Amherst) 

3 Lori DeAmato (Bent ley) 

4 Keri Bowlby (Springfield College) 

5 Jennifer Solari (Amherst College) 

8 Thomas Killilea (Colby College) 

9 Ryan Lee (Boston College) 



-99- 



MVC All Conference Awards 
Stacey Gillis 
Adrienne Fay 
Leanne Harris 
Carrie Tarantino 
Nancy Pote 
Nicole Ouellette 
Jill Murphy 
Mary Armata 
Dennis Godin 
Dave Dussault 
Dan Ballou 
Andy Armata 
Tom Zaya 
Eric Robbins 
Tom Aprile 
Charlene Fox 
Steve Greco 
Jason Earley 
Tom Killilea 



'94 


(field hockey) 






'94 


(Softball and soccer) 




'96 


(field hockey) 






'93 


(Softball) 






'95 


( soccer) 






'93 


(Softball) 






'94 


(spring track) 






'95 


(soccer) 






'93 


(spring track and 


winter 


track) 


'94 


( soccer) 






'93 


(spring track and 


winter 


track) 


'94 


(soccer) 






'93 


(spring track and 


winter 


track) 


'94 


(football) 






'93 


(spring track and 


winter 


track) 


'93 


(tennis) 






'93 


(tennis) 






'93 


(baseball ) 






'93 


(winter track) 







The 1993 girls and boys basketball teams coached by Sue Power and Jim McCune, 
qualified for the state tournament. The boys won two tournament gaunes. The 
1993 boys 4x400 relay team coached by Bob Cripps and Frank Kelley were State 
and New England Champions. They were ranked 5th in the nation. The 1993 boys 
baseball team coached by Dick Scanlon was M.V.C. small school co-champions and 
qualified for the state tourney. The 1993 girls softball team coached by Paul 
Lyman and Jake Townsend were the M.V.C. small school champions and went on to 
win their first ever Eastern Massachusetts Championship as well as Division 2 
State Championship. The 1993 girls and boys soccer teams coached by Sue 
Hendee and Dick Scanlon qualified for the state tournament. The 1993 girls 
field hockey team coached by Jan Urquhart again qualified for the state 
tournament. 

Jan Cassidy Wood retired after serving twenty-three years as varsity field 
hockey coach. Her teams compiled an incredible record of: 223 wins, 43 
losses and 52 ties. They won twelve M.V.C. Championships and made seventeen 
state tourney appearances. 




Members of the 1993 Wilmington High School Girls Softball State Championship Team. 



-100- 



PERSONNEL 



The Wilmington Public Schools was saddened to learn of the death of Roger 
Breakey, a Guidance Counselor at Wilmington High School. Mr. Breakey was a 
long time dedicated employee of the school system who touched the lives of 
many students, parents and co-workers. 

The Wilmington School community wishes Mr. Robert Mills who retired from the 
Wilmington Public Schools this year many happy and healthful years. 

In conclusion, we would like to take this opportunity to extend our 
appreciation to the administrators, teachers, parents, and students who 
contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools during the 1993 
school year. A special note of thanks to the many town departments that 
cooperated with the school system in 1993. 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District 

Elected representatives of the Regional School Committee are: Anthony R. 
Mazzone and Mark Trifiro from Bedford; Kenneth L. Buffum, Vice Chairman, and 
Bernard F. Hoar, Secretary, from Billerica; John P. Miller, Chairman, and 
Alfred Verrier from Burlington; Richard E. Griffin and J. Peter Downing, 
Treasurer, from Tewksbury; and John M. Gillis and Michael Smith from 
Wilmington. 

As one of twenty-five regional vocational technical school districts in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Shawsheen Valley Technical continued to offer 
comprehensive vocational/technical education for approximately one thousand 
forty-seven high school students and sixty full-time adults. In addition, 
five hundred adults participated in the part-time Adult Education program; and 
over two hundred junior high school students participated in the after school 
Career Education program. 

Upon graduation, full-time students receive both a comprehensive academic high 
school diploma and competency certification in their chosen technical 
discipline. Over ninety-six percent of the June 1991 graduates either 
acquired jobs within their skilled professions or pursued higher education at 
various colleges. 

Chris Botte of Wilmington, an electrical major and the class valedictorian of 
the Class of 1993, was selected as one of the top ten vocational students in 
the United States and awarded a full scholarship to Suffolk University. 
Thirty-one percent of Shawsheen 's 1993 graduating class went to college. 
Shawsheen Valley Technical 's graduation placement statistics were amongst the 
highest among the state's Regional Vocational Technical High Schools. 

Consistent with the requirements of the recent Educational Reform Legislation, 
Shawsheen formed, in September 1993, its School Council. Members include: 
Assistant Superintendent-Director Robert Cunningham, parents William Bulens, 
Jean Glejzer of Billerica and Cosmo Ciccariello of Burlington, community 
member Robert Pease of Pease Graphics of Billerica, teachers Roger Bourgeois 
and Robert Kanellas, student representatives Shauna Welch of Tewksbury and 
Katie Trevison of Wilmington. 

The School Committee is deeply indebted to the continued contributions of the 
three hundred area businessmen who serve on Shawsheen Valley Technical 's 
Advisory Committees. Advisory committee members meet twice each year to 
monitor technical programs guaranteeing curriculum and equipment are up to 
date while ensuring graduating students acquire skills to meet the needs of 
local businesses. 



-101- 



Many activities took place during 1993 which deserve special recognition: 



* The increase of 42 students in the freshman class for September 1993 
translates to a 15.5% increase over the previous freshman class. 
Overall, school enrollment increased approximately 4% over the previous 
year. For the first time in several years, Shawsheen has re-established 
its waiting list process for ninth grade openings consistent with the 
policies established by the School Committee. 

* In the fall of 1993, 31.4% of the senior class were already employed in 
co-operative work positions with area businesses. 

* The number of students participating in the Peer Leadership Program 
doubled over the previous year. Peer leaders provided tutoring and 
training for fellow students and actively participated in many 
worthwhile community events including: a feeding program for the 
homeless project with the Middlesex Shelter; a Christmas memorial 
ornamentation program with the American Cancer Society; and a welcoming 
breakfast program for incoming Shawsheen students. 

* Shawsheen Valley Technical will continue Project Freedom, an after 
school program allowing two hundred junior high school students the 
opportunity to explore six technology programs. This program is funded 
by a grant from the Massachusetts Department of Education Division of 
Occupational Education. 

* Shawsheen enhanced its participation as an active member of the 
Merrimack Valley Occupational and Tech-Prep Educators Collaborative. 
MVOTEC is headquartered at Shawsheen. This nationally recognized 
program builds bridges from one educational institution to the next for 
students matriculating to college. Shawsheen is a partner with other 
area vocational technical schools and has developed Articulation 
Agreements with Merrimack College, Middlesex Community College, and 
Northern Essex Community College. Shawsheen students receive credit for 
courses taken during their junior and senior year of high school toward 
a college degree. Over 157 present Shawsheen Technical students are 
actively enrolled in this Tech-Prep program. 

* Shawsheen Valley celebrated the third year of its adult Medical Coding 
program. Students, ranging from 22 to 60 years of age, receive training 
in medical terminology, anatomy, accounting, computers and medical 
coding. The graduating class of 1993 received 100% employment at Lahey 
Clinic, Harvard Community Health, Winchester Hospital and local doctors' 
offices. This ten month full-time prograim is funded by a grant received 
from Massachusetts Department of Medical Security. Businesses 
interested in establishing needed training programs or adults who 

are either unemployed or underemployed should call Mr. John McDermott, 
Assistant Superintendent Director for Community Services at (508) 
667-2111 for additional information. 

* Over two hundred and fifty students participated in the Vocational 
Industrial Clubs of America yearly district, state, and national 
competitions. Many Shawsheen Valley Technical students received state 
awards while seven students participated in the national VICA 
competition held in June in Louisville, Kentucky. 

* The district was selected by the Department of Education to develop a 
state-wide model ninth grade Exploratory Program. The $60,000 grant 
allowed educators throughout Massachusetts to develop a model 
exploratory curriculum under the leadership of Mark Small, Shawsheen 's 
Freshman Guidance Coordinator. During their freshman year, students 
learn about and explore the many occupations available to them enabling 
them to make informed decisions on career opportunities. 



-102- 



* In May of 1993, the Town of Burlington honored staff and students in 
Shawsheen's construction departments for significant improvements made 
at Simonds Park in Burlington. Improvements included: enlarging the 
concessions building; expanding lavatory facilities; ceramic tiling of 
floors; and remodeling the kitchens. The work was performed by the 
carpentry, masonry, electrical, and plumbing departments. 

* Other community projects completed by Shawsheen Valley Technical 
departments included: Culinary Arts students catering a retirement 
brunch for honored Billerica municipal retirees; Carpentry students 
building and installing shelving at the Billerica Public Library; 
Plumbing students installing hook-ups at the Burlington Fire Department 
headquarters; Metal Fabrication students fabricating radiator covers for 
the Tewksbury Town Hall and constructing eight goal posts for use by the 
Billerica Youth Soccer league; Carpentry students rebuilding and 
remodeling areas in the Wilmington Police Department headquarters; 
Masonry and Plumbing students renovating the music/auditorium at the 
Lane School in Bedford into a regular classroom; Graphic Arts students 
printing various reports for local school and municipal departments; and 
Carpentry students renovating the operations room at the Burlington 
Police Department. Shawsheen Valley Technical staff and students 
supported Billerica' s annual Yankee Doodle Parade and Homecoming by 
constructing various booths and signs. These and other community 
projects were completed as Shawsheen Valley Technical Students began 
constructing a three-level garrison colonial home with a two car garage 
in Andover Heights in Wilmington. Citizens who wish to have a home 
built by Shawsheen students may participate in the annual house building 
project lottery. Please contact Mr. Anthony Bazzinotti, Director of 
Vocational Technical Programs at (508) 667-2111, extension 143 for 
eligibility requirements. 

* Over three hundred students participated in the district co-ed 
interscholastic athletic programs Commonwealth Conference. Titles were 
won by the football, wrestling, and boys' basketball teams. Albert 
Belanger of Billerica was a state finalist in the 125 pound wrestlers 
division. David Smith of Bedford was awarded a full football 
scholarship to Northeastern University. 

The aforementioned highlights provide a snapshot of the dynamic programs 
offered member communities and citizens by the imaginative professional staff 
employed at Shawsheen Valley Technical. The elected School Committee members 
remain committed to adequately prepare area youth for excellent employment 
opportunities for the twenty-first century. 

Prospective students and residents are urged to contact the school's Guidance 
Department at (508) 667-2111 for additional information regarding the various 
career programs offered to area residents. The district's continued success 
is a direct result of the support received from Town Administrators, Boards of 
Selectmen, Finance Committees, Town Meeting members, and citizens. We very 
much appreciate their cooperation and support. 



-103- 



Town Meetings 

SPECIAL RECALL ELECTION 
FEBRUARY 2, 1993 



The polls were opened at 7:00 A.M. by Town Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon at the 
Town Hall and Assistant Town Clerk, Carolyn M. Kenney at the Wildwood School. 
The zero sheets were removed from the machines to show all interested parties 
that they were clear. 

The Special Recall Election, the first in the history of the Town of 
Wilmington, was well attended. The day was cold and crisp. A total of 3,843 
which included one hundred twenty-eight (128) absentee ballots were cast. This 
figure reflects 33% of the town's registered voters of 11,780. 

There were two sections to the ballot: 



FOR THE RECALL OF SHIRLEY F. CALLAN 
AGAINST THE RECALL OF SHIRLEY F. CALLAN 



FOR THE RECALL OF LINDA T. MCMENIMEN 
AGAINST THE RECALL OF LINDA T. MCMENIMEN 



CANDIDATES 



School Committee (Unexpired term to April. 1994) Vote for one 
Robert E. Surran, 13 Crest Avenue 

Shirley F. Callan, 571 Woburn St. (candidate for re-election) 

School Committee (Unexpired term to April. 1995) Vote for one 
Suzanne Spiris Rooney, 47 Towpath Drive 

Linda T. McMenimen, 14 Grace Drive (candidate for re-election) 



The results were as follows: 



FOR THE RECALL OF SHIRLEY F. CALLAN YES 1,146 

AGAINST THE RECALL OF SHIRLEY F. CALLAN NO 2,544 

BLANKS 153 

TOTAL 3,843 

FOR THE RECALL OF LINDA T. MCMENIMEN YES 1,058 

AGAINST THE RECALL OF LINDA T. MCMENIMEN NO 2,607 

BLANKS 178 

TOTAL 3,843 

Declaration of the vote was made at 9:05 p.m. The recall fails and the two 
members of the School Committee remain on board through their respective 



-104- 



WARRANT ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION APRIL 17. 1993 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner 
prescribed in the By-Laws of said town, you are hereby directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the town qualified to vote in town affairs to meet and 
assemble at the Town Hall Auditorium (Precincts 1, 2, and 5) and the Wildwood 
School (Precincts 3, 4, and 6,), N.B., Saturday the seventeenth day of April, 
A.D. 1993 at 9:45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 
a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the election of Town Officers: 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the 
following named offices, to wit: Two Selectmen for the terms of Three Years; 
Two Members of the School Committee for the terms of Three Years; One Member 
of the School Committee for the term of Two Years; One Member of the Housing 
Authority for the term of Five Years; One Member of the Redevelopment 
Authority for the term of Five Years; One Member of the Redevelopment 
Authority for the term of Three Years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said 
inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections 
and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet in the Town Meeting 
at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington, on 
Saturday the twenty-fourth day of April, A.D. 1993 at 10:30 a.m., then and 
there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the election was called by the Town 
Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon at the Town Hall and the Assistant Town Clerk, 
Carolyn M. Kenney at the Wildwood School, and the warrant as above was read. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the 
candidates could exeumine them before the polls were opened. The checkers were 
prepared with their voting lists and voter identification cards and everything 
was in readiness at 10:00 A.M. 

At 10:00 A.M. the Town Clerk declared the polls open. 



SELECTMEN for three years (vote for two) Voted 

Mark T. Haldane 12 Arlene Avenue (Candidate Re-election) 1,242 

Diane M. Allan 1 Corey Avenue Elected 1,691 

Anthony P. Capuano 1 Ring Avenue 1,045 

Michael V. McCoy 71 Lowell Street Elected 1,635 

Thomas W. Siracusa 5 Elwood Road 863 

Blanks 856 

Total 7,332 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE for three years (vote for two) Voted 

Margaret A. Kane 40 Hanover St. (Candidate Re-election) 1,771 

James A. Demos 40 Hopkins St. Elected 1,851 

Robert W. Young 640 Woburn St. Elected 2,239 

Blanks 1.471 

Total 7,332 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE for two years (vote for one) 

Madeleine Leger 27 Sheldon Avenue 1,391 

Paul R. Palizzolo 6 Safford Street Elected 1,686 

Blanks 589 

Total 3,666 



-105- 



HOUSING AUTHORITY for five years fvote for one) 

Charles R. Fiore, Jr. Third Avenue Elected 

Blanks 

Total 

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY for five years (vote for one) 
Dennis J. Volpe 8 Reed Street Elected 

Blanks 
Total 

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY for three years (vote for one) 
Sidney R. Kaizer 5 Cottage Street Elected 

Blanks 
Total 



Voted 
2,431 
1.235 
3,666 

Voted 
2,336 
1.330 
3,666 

Voted 
2,224 
1.442 
3,666 



The results of the election were ready about 9:40 P.M. and all the elected 
officers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by the Town 
Clerk shortly thereafter. The total number of votes cast was 3,666 which 
included 196 absentee ballots. The total number of registered voters are 
11,744 of which 31% voted in this town election. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 1993 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



With a quorum present at 10:40 A.M. (157) James C. Stewart, the Moderator, 
opened the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag. He then read 
the names of departed town workers who had passed away during the past year 
and a moment of silence was observed. He then introduced our newly and re- 
elected town officials and thanked those who had served and not been re- 
elected or those who did not seek re-election. 

The Moderator then started to read the warrant and was interrupted by Chairman 
Chester A. Bruce, Jr., "I move that the Moderator dispense with further 
reading of the warrant and take up and make reference to each article by 
number." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 2: To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. Motion by Michael 
A. Caira, "I move that the town pass over this article." Motion seconded and 
so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years; or do anything 
in relation thereto. Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move to pass over this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1993, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 17; or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Selectman Robert J. Cain reads the same as above article, 
motion seconded and so voted.) 

ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the town will appropriate for the expenses 
of the town and the salaries of several town officers and departments and 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from 
available funds, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Thomas E. Casey of the Finance Committee, "I move that the 
several and respective sums as recommended and presented by the Finance 
Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and 
appropriated for the purpose set forth in Article #5, each department's 
budget to be taken up and voted on in the order they appear, subject to 
amendment, and each department's budget not open for reconsideration 
until the entire budget is voted." Mr. Casey urged voters to support 



-106- 



this budget, as it is a maintenance effort budget, providing the same 
excellent services that the town supplied last year, and offers a modest 
three and one-half to four percent increase for salaries. There was 
discussion about how much the state will be funding Wilmington. The 
local aid of last year $ 300, OOP to $ 400,000 is anticipated. 
Representative James R. Miceli stated this may be a problem, as the 
Education Reform Bill is still being debated. The Town Manager, Michael 
A. Caira stated that school and town will share equally if state aid is 
less. ) 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries (p.t.) 1,500 

Expenses 7,000 

Total 8,500 

Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries (p.t.) 7,042 

Expenses 2. 530 

Total 9,572 

Registrars of Voters 

Salaries 1,690 

Expenses 3,465 

Total 5,155 

Finance Committee 

Salaries (p.t.) 1,200 

Expenses 4, 500 

Total 5,700 

Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 75,000 



(Motion by Michael V. McCoy, Selectman, "I move that the salary line 
item, account Town Manager be eunended and reduced to read $ 65 , 000 
instead of S 75.000 and I further move that when a vote is taken on this 
matter it be taken by a secret ballot." Motion seconded and much 
discussion took place on this amendment. This article took over one and 
one-half hours. Many citizens spoke on behalf of the Manager and 
Michael V. McCoy stated he had Ceunpaigned on this issue and wanted to 
present this motion. Vote was taken on motion for secret ballot. It 
was defeated Yes 46 No 201. Motion to reduce salary by $ 10.000 failed. 
$ 75.000 voted) 



Other Salaries 181,113 

Expenses 42,162 

Furnishings & Equipment 925 
Total 299,200 

Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant 54,272 

Other Salaries 57,529 

Expenses 2.020 

Total 113,821 

Treasurer /Collector 

Salary - Treasurer/Collector 54,272 

Other Salaries 96,376 

Expenses 26,849 

Furnishings & Equipment 2 . 500 

Total 176,997 

Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk 40,044 

Other Salaries 34,469 

Expenses 2,101 

Furnishings & Equipment 187 

Total 76,801 



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Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 52,612 

Other Salaries 61,912 

Expenses 26,800 

Appraisals, E.D.P. & Inventories 29,000 

Furnishings & Equipment 2 , 500 

Total 172,824 

Town Counsel 

Personal Services & Expenses 57 , 200 

Permanent Building Committee 

Salaries (p.t.) 500 

Expenses 100 

Total 600 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 926. 370 

PROTECTION - PERSONS & PROPERTY 
Police Department 

Salary - Chief 68,834 

Deputy Chief 56,107 

Lieutenants 100,057 

Sergeants 255,557 

Patrolmen 1,037,754 

Clerks 60,62 5 

Fill-In Costs 210,940 

Paid Holidays 64,065 

Specialists 10,200 

Night Shift Differential 29,160 

Incentive Pay 37,200 

Sick Leave Buyback 10,120 

Expenses 114,960 

D.A.R.E. Progrcun 

Furnishings & Equipment 35 . 900 

Total 2,091,479 

Fire 

Salary - Chief 55,054 

Deputy Chief 50,598 

Lieutenants 212,237 

Privates 864,249 

Dispatch Clerks 52,771 

Overtime Costs 140,400 

Paid Holidays 61,917 

EMT & Incentive Pay 56,800 

Fire Alarm Salary 9,545 

Sick Leave Buyback 11,389 

Expenses 47,237 

Furnishings & Equipment p 

Total 1,562,197 

Emergency Management 

Salaries 1,600 

Expenses 1,400 

Furnishings & Equipment g 

Total 3,000 

Animal Control 

Contract Services 25 938 

Expenses ' 500 

Total 26,438 

TOTAL PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 3.683. 114 



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PUBLIC WORKS 



Personal Services 

DPW - Superintendent 70,678 

Engineer - Full Time 73,717 

Engineer - Part Time 33,180 

Highway - Other 758,088 

Highway - Other Part Time 

Tree - Full Time 74,034 

Tree - Overtime 6,960 

Parks /Grounds - Full Time 121,020 

Parks/Grounds - Part Time 

Parks/Grounds - Overtime 12,535 

Cemetery - Full Time 97,205 



(Motion by Thomas E. Casey, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
3 97.205 be appropriated for Public Works Personal Services 
Cemetery - Full Time; the sum of $ 25. 000 to be raised by transfer 
from the Sale of Cemetery Lots Account and the sum of $ 20. 000 to be 
raised by transfer from the Interest - Cemetery Trust Funds and the 
balance of $ 52 . 205 to be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and 
so voted. ) 



Cemetery - Part Time 

Cemetery - Overtime 5,785 

Snow & Ice - Ex. Help/O.T. 119.635 

Total 1,372,837 

Contractual Services 

Engineer 1,900 

Highway 25,140 

Highway - Repair Town Vehicles 64,440 

Tree 3,402 

Parks/Grounds 3,353 

Cemetery 4,074 

Road Machinery - Repair 60,000 

Public Street Lights 190,028 

Rubbish Collection & Disposal 1,261,732 

Snow & Ice - Repair 16,246 

Snow & Ice - Misc. 66.000 

Total 1,696,315 

Materials & Supplies 

Engineer 1,900 

Highway - Expenses 33,600 

Highway - Const. & Road Improvements 390,991 



(Motion by Thomas E. Casey, Finance Committee, "I move that the 
sum of $ 390. 991 be appropriated for Public Works Materials and 
Supplies - Highway Construction and Road Improvements; the sum of 
$ 370. 991 to be raised by transfer from Chapter 90 Construction 
monies and the balance of $ 20.000 to be raised by taxation." 
Motion seconded and so voted.) 



Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 55,846 

Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 44,545 

Tree 5,895 

Parks/Grounds 25,000 

Cemetery 21,423 

C90M - Expenses 

C81M - Expenses 60,796 

Drainage Projects - Expenses 15,000 

Snow & Ice - Sand & Salt 87,139 

Snow & Ice - Tools & Equipment 4,000 

Furnishings & Equipment Q 

Total 746,135 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 3.815.287 



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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



Board of Health 

Salary - Director 

Other Salaries (inc. P/T) 

Expenses 

Mental Health 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 



46,529 
75,161 
6,100 
14,581 

Q 

142,371 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Salaries (inc. P/T) 
Expenses 
Total 



3,780 

80 

3,860 



Planning & Conservation 
Salary - Director 
Other Salaries (inc. P/T) 
Expenses 
Total 



46,911 
58,956 
5.190 
111,057 



Building Insp./Bd. of Appeals 
Salary - Building Inspector 
Other Salaries (inc. P/T) 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



46,529 
49,321 
3,272 



99,122 



TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



Maintenance & Operation 

Salary - Superintendent 

Other Salaries 

Other - Overtime 

Expenses - Heating Fuel 

Electricity 

Utilities 

Expenses 

Furnishings & Ecjuipment 
Total 



63,735 
1,142,685 
21,300 
209,391 
74,160 
61,196 
209,000 
12.000 
1,793,467 



HUMAN SERVICES 



Veterans' Aid & Benefits 

Salary - Part Time Agent 
Expenses 

Assistance - Veterans 
Total 



5,200 
1,325 
15.000 
21,525 



Library 

Salary - Director 

Other Salaries (inc. P/T) 

Expenses 



50,595 
233,485 
63.317 



(Motion by Ann D. Linehan, "I move that Library line item expenses be 
amended by $110 for membership to American Library Association." 
Patricia F. Duggan, Library Trustees Chairman stated the actual cost 
would be $330. Motion seconded and so voted $330.) 



Total 



347,397 



Recreation 

Salary - Director 

Other Salaries (inc. P/T) 

Expenses 

Total 



50,595 
21,000 
2.700 
74,295 



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Elderly Services 

Salary - Director 

Other Salaries (inc. P/T) 

Expenses 

Total 



35,340 
26,000 
30.018 
91,358 



Historical Commission 

Salaries (inc. P.T.) 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



800 
850 



1,650 



Commission on Disabilities 
Salaries (inc. P.T.) 
Expenses 
Total 



600 
300 
900 



TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 



537.125 



SCHOOLS 



Wilmington School Department 



12,901,496 



(Motion by Paul R. Palizzolo, School Committee, "I move that the town 
raise and appropriate $ 12,497.496 in anticipation that state aid ear- 
marked education funds will be made available by the General Court in 
the anticipated amount of $ 404. OOP , which may be expended by the School 
Committee without further appropriation; and further that in the event 
that the earmarked education funds are not available or that they are 
less than the anticipated amount then it is the intent to deal with a 
shortfall at a Special Town Meeting at which time both the Municipal 
Budget and the School Committee Budget will be amended for this 
purpose." Seconded and so voted.) 

Shawsheen Valley Reg. Vocational District 1,182,253 

(Motion by Anne Corrieri, Secretary, Shawsheen Valley Regional School, 
"I move to amend line item Shawsheen Valley Regional School District 
from $ 1. 182 ,253 to $ 1,285,681 . " Motion seconded. Charles Lyons, 
Superintendent, stated that many more students were attending the school 
from Wilmington. Amendment was defeated. $ 1 . 182 .253 was then voted.) 

TOTAL SCHOOLS 14.083.749 

MATURING DEBT S INTEREST 

Schools 1,044,657 
General Government 94,318 

(Motion by Thomas E. Casey, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$ 94. 318 be appropriated for Maturing Debt & Interest - General 
Government the sum of $ 49 . 531 to be raised from Capital Project 
Closeouts and the balance of S 44. 787 to be raised by taxation." 
Motion seconded and so voted. ) 

Water 1,041,813 

(Motion by Thomas E. Casey, Finance Committee, "I move that the 
sum of $ 1.041.813 be appropriated for Maturing Debt & Interest - 
Water to be raised by transfer from Water Department - Available 
Funds with zero to be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so 
voted. ) 

Sewer 596,117 
Interest on Anticipation Notes & 

Authorization Fees & Misc. Debt 102,060 



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(Motion by Thomas E. Casey, Finance Committee, "I move that the 
sum of S 102.060 be appropriated for Maturing Debt & Interest- 
Authorization Fees & Miscellaneous Debt; the sum of $ 3 . 700 to be raised 
by transfer from Water Department - Available Funds and the balance of 
S 98.360 to be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted.) 



TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 



UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Veterans' Retirement 32,951 

Retirement - Unused Sick Leave 21,450 

Medicare Employer Contribution 66,780 

(Motion by Thomas E. Casey, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
S 66, 780 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve Medicare Employer's 

Contribution; the sum of $ 4. 868 to be raised by transfer from Water 

Department - Available Funds with the balance of $ 61.912 to be raised 
by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 

Unemployment Payments 

Salary Adjust. & Additional Costs 25,000 

Local Trans. /Training Conferences 6,300 

Out-of-state Travel 1,000 

Computer Hardware/Software Maintenance 47,654 

Microfilm 1,000 

Annual Audit 13,900 

Ambulance Billing 10,000 

Town Report 5,500 

Hazardous Material Consulting Service 2,500 

Sewer Maintenance 20,000 

Reserve Fund 70,000 

Insurance & Bonds 661,987 

(Motion by Thomas E. Casey, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$ 661, 987 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve - Insurance and 
Bonds; the sum of $ 88, 976 to be raised by transfer from Water Department 
Available Funds with the balance of $ 573.011 to be raised by taxation." 
Motion seconded. ) 

Employee Health & Life Insurance 1,751,205 

(Motion by Thomas E. Casey, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$ 1.751.205 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve - Employee 
Health & Life Insurance; the sum of $ 174. 834 to be raised by transfer 
from Water Department - Available Funds with the balance of $ 1. 576. 371 
to be raised by taxation.") 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 2.737.227 

TOTAL MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 16.727.965 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase of new and replacement capital ec[uipment including but 
not limited to the following items, and further to authorize the sale or turn 
in, if any, and for the use of the department so designated; and to determine 
how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any 
combination thereof : 

(a) Police Department 

Replacement of four police cruisers. 

(Motion by Gerald R. Duggan, Selectman, "I move that the town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $ 55 . 380 for the purpose of purchasing 
four (4) replacement police cruisers for the Police Department, and 
further to authorize the sale or turn in, if any of said replaced 
vehicles." Motion seconded. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion so voted.) 



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(b) Department of Public Works 

Replacement of two 4X4 heavy duty pickup trucks. 



(Motion by Chester A. Bruce, Jr., Chairman, "I move that the town vote 
to transfer the sum of $ 8, 130 from FY-1993 DPW Capital Outlay Account 
and further raise and appropriate the sum of $ 12,869 . the entire sum 
being $ 20,999 for the purpose of purchasing one (1) replacement 4x4 
heavy duty pickup truck and further to authorize the sale or turn in, if 
any, of said replaced vehicles." Motion seconded. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion so voted.) 

(c) School Department 

Acquisition of computer equipment for the High School. 

(Motion by Diane M. Allan, Selectman, "I move that the town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $ 16, 500 for the purpose of acquiring 
computer equipment for Wilmington High School, Wilmington School 
Department." Motion seconded. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion so voted.) 

(d) School Department 

Replacement of classroom furniture. 

(Motion by Michael V. McCoy, Selectman, "I move that the town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $ 30, 000 for the purpose of purchasing 
replacement classroom furniture for the elementary and intermediate 
schools of the Wilmington School Department." Motion seconded. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion so voted.) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the town will vote to purchase a replacement fire engine 
pumper for the use of the Wilmington Fire Department and to determine how an 
appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available 
funds, bonds or notes or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Robert J. Cain, Selectman, "I move that the town vote to 
appropriate the sum of S 230.000 for the purpose of purchasing a 
replacement fire engine pumper for the use of the Wilmington Fire 
Department and that said funds shall be raised by borrowing under the 
provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, and that the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow 
pursuant to said Chapter 44 of the General Laws as amended and to issue 
bonds or notes of the town at one time or from time to time; or by any 
combination thereof." Finance Committee recommends approval. Richard 
Duggan, Finance Committee, disapproves of a bond issue for Fire 
Department pumper. Motion seconded and so voted.) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase and installation of a central telephone system for all 
general government buildings and to determine how the Seune shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof, or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Gerald R. Duggan, Selectman, "I move that the town vote to 
raise and appropriate by way of transfer from the Capital Stabilization 
Fund the sum of $ 51, 795 for the purpose of purchasing and installing a 
central telephone system for all general government buildings." Motion 
seconded. Finance Committee recommends approval of this article. 
Michael A. Caira, Town Manager, stated this will be a system to connect 
all town buildings. It will not interfere in any way with the 911 
enhanced system and through negotiations, this should save the town 
approximately $ 14, 000 in line charges. Motion so voted.) 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase and installation of a furnace for the Town Hall and to 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof, or do anything in relation thereto. 



-113- 



(Motion by Chester A. Bruce, Jr., Chairman, "I move that the town vote 
to raise and appropriate by way of transfer from the Capital 
Stabilization Fund the sum of S 25.000 for the purchase and installation 
of a furnace for the Town Hall." Motion seconded. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Roger J. Lessard, Public Buildings Superintendent, 
answered questions concerning installation and also stated that the 
furnace contract will go out for bid. Motion so voted.) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to replace a section of roof at the Woburn Street Elementary School and 
to determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof, or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Diane M. Allan, Selectman, "I move that the town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of S 34. 214 for the purpose of replacing a 
section of roof at the Woburn Street Elementary School." Motion 
seconded. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion so voted.) 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the town will vote to transfer from available funds in 
the FY-1993 budget, a sum or sums of money for the operation of various town 
departments and expenses, or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Thomas E. Casey, Finance Committee, "I move that the town 
vote to transfer from Available Funds in the FY-1993 budget, the amount 
of $ 212 , 653 to the Salaries Adjustments and Additional Cost Account and 
that such sums of money be transferred from the following accounts." 
Motion seconded. Finance Committee recommends approval. So voted.) 



Fire 


Fire Clerical Salaries 


5,155 


Permanent Bldg. Comm. 


Perm. Bldg. Comm. Expenses 


250 


Permanent Bldg. Comm. 


Perm. Bldg. Comm. Salaries 


1,200 


Planning & Conservation 


Planning Dept. Expenses 


1,000 


Police 


Police Lieutenants Salaries 


17,342 


Public Buildings 


Public Bldg. Fuel Heating 


14,152 


Public Buildings 


Public Bldg. Electricity 


6,533 


Public Works 


DPW Misc. Contractual Services 


8, 130 


Public Works 


DPW Repair town Vehicles 


5,000 


Public Works 


DPW Salaries Other 


47,807 


Public Works 


Cemetery Const. Supplies 


10,000 


Public Works 


Tree Salaries Other 


10,901 


Unclassified 


Ambulance Billing 


4,000 


Unclassified 


Annual Audit 


3,600 


Unclassified 


Hazardous Materials 


5,000 


Unclassified 


Local Training/Conference 


4, 500 


Unclassified 


Microfilm Project 


1,000 


Unclassified 


Out-of-state Train/Conference 


1,000 


Unclassified 


Police/Fire Sick Buyback 


3,583 


Unclassified 


Unemployment Compensation 


10,000 


Unclassified 


Veterans' Retirement 


2,500 


Debt & Interest 


Debt-Miscellaneous 


50.000 




Total 


$212,653 



(Motion by Thomas E. Casey, Finance Committee, "I move that the town 
vote to transfer the sum of $ 56,422 from the FY-1993 Unclassified and 
Reserve - Insurance Account to the FY-1993 Unclassified and Reserve 
Employee Retirement Unused Sick Leave." Motion seconded. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. So voted.) 

Articles from this number on drawn by lottery. 

ARTICLE 12. (drawn as #6) To see if the town will vote to appropriate by 
transfer, a sum of money totalling $ 308. 148 from prior years' surplus in the 
Provision For Abatements Account (Overlay) to fund the Town of Wilmington's 
allocable share of a final judgment rendered in the matter of Massachusetts 
Refusetech, Inc. vs. North East Solid Waste Committee, or do anything in 
relation thereto. 



-114- 



(Motion by Michael A. Caira, Town Manager, "I move that the town vote 
to appropriate by transfer, a sum of money totalling $ 308. 148 from prior 
years' surplus in the Provision for Abatements Account (Overlay) to fund 
the Town of Wilmington's allocable share of a final judgment rendered in 
the matter of Massachusetts Refusetech, Inc. vs. North East Solid Waste 
Committee." Motion seconded. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
So voted. ) 

ARTICLE 13. (drawn as #15) To see if the town will authorize the Town 
Manager, with the approval of the Selectmen, to sell any personal property; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Michael A. Caira, Town Manager, "I move that the town 
authorize the Town Manager, with the approval of the Selectmen, to sell 
any personal property or material in excess of the aggregate of $ 500 and 
deemed surplus to the needs of the town and to determine the appropriate 
disposition of said property and further that any proceeds from the sale 
of such property shall be transferred to the Capital Stabilization 
Fund." Motion seconded. Finance Committee recommends approval. Town 
Manager explained that because of a Town By-law this article is needed 
to allow the sale of these items valued over $500. John DeMarco asked 
if this includes School Department. The School Department could also be 
included in this sale if they wished. Motion seconded and so voted.) 

ARTICLE 14. (drawn as #14) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen and/or Town Manager to petition the Great and General Court 
for the purpose of amending Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958, AN ACT 
AUTHORIZING THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON TO CONSTRUCT AND OPERATE A SYSTEM OF SEWERS 
(as amended September 1977), by deleting Section 6 contained therein and 
substituting the following: 

Section 6: The town shall, by vote, determine what proportion of the 
cost of said system or systems of sewerage and sewage disposal, if any, the 
town shall pay. In providing for the payment of the cost of said system or 
systems of sewerage and sewage disposal, including the use of said system or 
systems by abutters to the system or systems of sewerage and sewage disposal, 
including public and private institutions, the town may avail itself of any or 
all of the methods permitted by the General Laws, including annual charges, as 
provided for in Section 16 of Chapter 83 thereof, which may be applied to the 
payment of the cost of operation, maintenance and repairs of the system or 
systems of sewerage and sewage disposal, and to defray also such portion of 
the cost of the construction of said system or systems as the town shall by 
vote determine. The charges and assessments shall be paid by every person or 
institution who enters his or its particular sewer into the system or systems 
of sewerage and sewage disposal of the town. The provisions of said General 
Laws relative to the assessment, apportionment, division, reassessment, 
abatement and collection of sewer assessments, to liens therefor and to 
interest thereon, except as provided herein, shall apply to assessments and 
annual charges made under this act, and the interest shall be at a rate of 
five percent, per annum. The Collector of Taxes of said town shall certify 
the payment or payments of such assessments or apportionments thereof to the 
Board of Sewer Commissioners, who shall preserve a record thereof; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Arthur F. Spear, Jr., Sewer Financing Advisory Board, "I move 
that the town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or Town 
Manager to petition the Great and General Court for the purpose of 
amending Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958, AN ACT AUTHORIZING THE TOWN OF 
WILMINGTON TO CONSTRUCT AND OPERATE A SYSTEM OF SEWERS (as amended 
September 1977), by deleting Section 6 contained therein and 
substituting the following: 

Section 6: The town shall, by vote, determine what proportion of the 
cost of said system or systems of sewerage and sewage disposal, if any, 
the town shall pay. In providing for the payment of the cost of said 
system or systems of sewerage and sewage disposal, including the use of 
said system or systems by abutters to the system or systems of sewerage 
and sewage disposal, including public and private institutions, the town 
may avail itself of any or all of the methods permitted by the General 



-115- 



Laws, including annual charges, as provided for in Section 16 of Chapter 
83 thereof, which may be applied to the payment of the cost of 
operation, maintenance and repairs of the system or systems of sewerage 
and sewage disposal, and to defray also such portion of the cost of the 
construction of said system or systems as the town shall by vote 
determine. The charges and assessments shall be paid by every person or 
institution who enters his or its particular sewer into the system or 
systems of sewerage and sewage disposal of the town. The provisions of 
said General Laws relative to the assessment, apportionment, division, 
reassessment, abatement and collection of sewer assessments, to liens 
therefor and to interest thereon, except as provided herein, shall apply 
to assessments and annual charges made under this act, and the interest 
shall be at a rate of five percent, per annum. The Collector of Taxes 
of said town shall certify the payment or payments of such assessments 
or apportionments thereof to the Board of Sewer Commissioners, who shall 
preserve a record thereof and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the 
Town Manager are further authorized to make any amendment of the 
preceding Section 6 in order to accomplish the purpose thereof. 

Arthur Spear explained that this article allows the town to come up with 
a more equitable way to fund sewer projects in the town. Each project 
would be funded on its own merit and further Town Meetings could vote on 
each project and the way each would be funded. Alan Altman, Town 
Counsel, stated this article attempts to give the town more latitude. 
Unless changes are made, a small amount of people in the town on sewer 
will continue to pay the high MWRA charges. 

Discussion was held concerning the language of the additional wording. 
Mr. Spear stated this gives the article more flexibility and 
Representative James R. Miceli agreed this is consistent with enabling 
legislation and gives lawmakers the ability to see that the intent of 
the article is met. Motion seconded and so voted Yes 144 No 87.) 

ARTICLE 15. (drawn as #3) To see if the town will vote to accept a $ 48. 352 
Equal Educational Opportunity Grant for the Shawsheen Valley Regional 
Vocational Technical High School District for the 1993-1994 school year; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Michael A. Caira, Town Manager, "I move that the town vote to 
accept a $ 48, 352 Equal Educational Opportunity Grant for the Shawsheen 
Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School District for the 1993- 
1994 school year." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and voted unanimously. ) 

ARTICLE 16. (drawn as #11) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 5 , OOP for the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' 
Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have 
charge of said observances; or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Chester A. Bruce, Jr., Chairman, "I move that the town vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $ 5 , OOP for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a 
committee who shall arrange and have charge of said observances." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted 
unanimously. ) 

ARTICLE 17. (drawn as #13) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 75P.PP for the purpose of renewing, under authority of 
Section 9, Chapter 4P of the General Laws as amended, the lease of the Marine 
Corps League Clubhouse on Chestnut Street, for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Marine Corps League; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Motion by Gerald A. Duggan, Selectman, "I move that the town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of S 75P for the purpose of renewing, under 
authority of Section 9, Chapter 4P of the General Laws as amended, the 
lease of the Marine Corps League Clubhouse on Chestnut Street, for the 
purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the Marine Corps League.) 



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Amendment made by Christine Ondreicka, 1 Marion St. Extension, that no alcohol 
be consumed on the premises, as this is a residential neighborhood and there 
have been problems at the building. Mr. Thomas Casey from the Marine Corps 
League stated that to his knowledge there has been no problems with alcohol at 
the club. This building was repaired by the Marine Corps League and belongs 
to the town and is a credit to them. Dan Gillis spoke and stated this 
organization has improved the facilities and the veterans deserve these small 
amounts of money. Amendment defeated. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Original motion seconded and so voted by majority $ 750 . 

ARTICLE 18. (drawn as #21) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of S 750 for the purpose of renewing, under authority of 
Section 9, Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the lease of the Nee- 
Ellsworth Post 2458, on Main Street, for the purpose of providing suitable 
headc[uarters for the Veterans of Foreign Wars; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Motion by Chester A. Bruce, Jr., Chairman, "I move that the town vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of S 750 for the purpose of renewing, 
under authority of Section 9, Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, 
the lease of the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458, on Main Street, for the 
purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the Veterans of Foreign 
Wars." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted by majority $ 750 . ) 

ARTICLE 19. (drawn as #22) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 750 for the purpose of renewing, under authority of 
Section 9, Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the lease of the 
American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. on Bay Street, for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the American Legion Post 136; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Motion by Diane M. Allan, Selectman, "I move that the town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $ 750 for the purpose of renewing, under 
authority of Section 9, Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the 
lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., on Bay Street, for the 
purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the American Legion Post 
136." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted by majority $ 750 . ) 

ARTICLE 20. (drawn as #34) To see if the town will accept as town ways, the 
layout of the following described streets, as recommended by the Planning 
Board and approved by the Board of Selectmen (M.G.L. Ch. 82 as amended) and 
shown on Definitive Sub-Division plans approved in accordance with the "Rules 
and Regulations Governing the Sub-Division of Land in the Town of Wilmington, 
Massachusetts," and which plans are recorded at the Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds (M.N.R.D.), copies of which are available in the office of the Town 
Engineer and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of eminent 
domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation 
shall be raised whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or otherwise for the purpose of construction of said ways and for 
the payment of any damages from the takings of land and slope easements and 
other easements therefore; 

a. Allqrove Lane - from Woburn Street a distance of 470 feet, more or 
less, westerly and northerly to a cul-de-sac and as shown on a 
definitive subdivision plan entitled Allgrove Estates and recorded at 
the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 167, Plan 91 on 
December 21, 1988 and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by 
K. J. Miller Co., Inc. dated December 3, 1992. 

b. Cushinq Drive - from Shawsheen Avenue a distance of 990 feet, more or 
less, northeasterly to a cul-de-sac and as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Gushing Estates and recorded at the Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 173, Plan 145 on August 22, 1990 and 
as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Robert E. Anderson, 
Inc. dated August 11, 1992. 



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c. Rarle's Row - from Route 62 a distance of 800 feet, more or less, 
northerly and easterly to a cul-de-sac and as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Hamilton Woods and recorded at the Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 161, Plan 108 on September 29, 1987 
and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Robert E. Anderson, 
Inc. dated July 20, 1992. 

d. Henry L. Drive - from Woburn Street a distance of 651 feet, more or 
less, southerly to a cul-de-sac and as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Carter Estates and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 176, Plan 6 on June 4, 1991 and as shown on 
a street acceptance plan prepared by K. J. Miller Co., Inc. dated 
November 6, 1992. 

e. Jonspin Road - from Andover Street a distance of 3,800 feet, more or 
less, westerly, and by a loop to Jonspin Road and as shown on a 
definitive subdivision plan entitled North Wilmington Industrial Park 
and recorded at the Middlesex North Land Registry of Deeds, Document No. 
62620 (L.C.C. 3984), Certificate of Title 18944, Book 97, Page 287, on 
April 24, 1973 and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Dana 
Perkins, Inc. dated January 15, 1993. 

f. Towpath Drive - from Towpath Drive (Station 109 + 63.90) a distance of 
870 feet, more or less, southerly to Towpath Drive (Station 118 + 34.18) 
and as shown on a definitive subdivision plan entitled Chestnut Estates 
II and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 166, 
Plan 20 on August 25, 1988 and as shown on a street acceptance plan 
prepared by K. J. Miller Co., Inc. dated October 26, 1992. 

(Motion made by Michael V. McCoy, Selectman, reads the same as the above 
article with the deletion from this article of c. Earle's Row. Motion 
seconded. Finance Committee and Planning Board recommend approval with 
qualifiers. Voted unanimously. This was the last article drawn. ) 

ARTICLE 21. (drawn as #8) To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to grant easements to the New England Telephone and Telegraph 
Company and the Town of Reading Municipal Light Department for the purpose of 
providing for the transmission of intelligence and electricity, such easement 
locations being more particularly described below, in, on and over several 
private ways or paper streets and being contiguous to Town-owned land and to 
set an administrative fee therefore; location on Scigliano Street, Madison 
Road and Ogunquit Road and contiguous to Town-owned land described on 
Assessor's Map 50, Parcels 76 and 63. Also described in Plan Book 25, Plan 
39, entitled, "Plan of Lots at Central Park, Wilmington, Mass., April 1908. 
Scale 80 feet to an inch. James Adam, C.E., Old South Bdg. , Boston, 
Massachusetts," and being known as Parcels 108 and 109, and 166-171 and 216- 
227; or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Michael A. Caira, Town Manager, "I move that the town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant easements to the New England 
Telephone and Telegraph Company and the Town of Reading Municipal Light 
Department for the purpose of providing for the transmission of 
intelligence and electricity, such easement locations being more 
particularly described below, in, on and over several private ways or 
paper streets and being contiguous to Town-owned land and to set an 
administrative fee therefore; location on Scigliano Street, Madison Road 
and Ogunquit Road and contiguous to Town-owned land described on 
Assessor's Map 50, Parcels 76 and 63. Also described in Plan Book 25, 
Plan 39, entitled, "Plan of Lots at Central Park, Wilmington, Mass., 
April 1908. Scale 80 feet to an inch. James Adam, C.E., Old South 
Bdg., Boston, Massachusetts," and being known as Parcels 108 and 109, 
and 166-171 and 216-227. This is known as a license to pass agreement 
and the fee is $ 200 . Motion seconded. Finance Committee and Planning 
Board recommend approval. Motion seconded and voted unanimously.) 



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ARTICLE 22, (drawn as #32) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Conservation 
Commission. Said parcel is described as Map 45, Parcel 93Z; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Motion by Gerald R. Duggan, Selectman, "I move that the town vote to 
authorize transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a 
certain parcel of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter 
described to the Conservation Commission. Said parcel is described as 
Map 45, Parcel 93Z." Finance Committee and Planning Board recommend 
approval. No dollar amount is involved. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously. ) 

ARTICLE 23. (drawn as #17) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of 
the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer 
needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the 
same, all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that 
the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest 
in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 
3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 45, Parcel 93C; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Chester A. Bruce, Jr., Chairman, "I move that the town vote 
to authorize transfer of the care, custody, management and control of 
certain parcels of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter 
described to the Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having 
been determined to be no longer needed for any municipal purpose, and 
for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in accordance with 
the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen be and are 
hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as is 
owned by the Town of Wilmington for a price of not less than $ 560 and 
upon such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen 
in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and 
interest are described as Map 45, Parcel 93C." This land has been 
deemed surplus and a value of $ 560 placed on it by Humphrey J. Moynihan, 
Principal Assessor. Finance Committee and Planning Board recommend 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously.) 

ARTICLE 24. (drawn as #18) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of 
the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer 
needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the 
same, all in accordance with General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the 
Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in 
the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 
3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised. Said parcel and interest are described as follows: Assessor's Map 
67, Parcels 45, 46, 47, 48, 49 and 50; or to do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Attorney Robert Peterson reads the same as above article. 
This land is deemed surplus by the town and a value of $ 74, 100 placed on 
it by Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal Assessor. Finance Committee and 
Planning Board recommend approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously. ) 

ARTICLE 25. (drawn as #4) To see if the town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws, Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 



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be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
Bv-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and 
interest are described as Map 61, Parcel 6 (only a part of Parcel 6); or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

This land not deemed to be surplus. Planning Board recommends disapproval. 
Motion to pass over. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 26. (drawn as #7) To see if the town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws, Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and 
interest are described as Map 82, Parcel 146; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

This land not deemed to be surplus. Planning Board recommends disapproval. 
Motion to pass over. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 27. (drawn as #30) To see if the town will authorize transfer of the 
care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of land owned by the 
Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen be 
and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as is 
owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall be 
determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and 
interest are described as Map 55, Parcel 163; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Motion by Kenneth and Nancy Dorothy, reads the same as above. Planning 
Board and Finance Committee recommend approval. This land has been 
deemed surplus by the town and a value of $ 7 . 500 placed on it by 
Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal Assessor. Finance Committee and 
Planning Board recommend approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously. ) 

ARTICLE 28. (drawn as #19) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of 
the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer 
needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the 
same, all in accordance with General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the 
Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in 
the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 
3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised. Said parcel and interest are described as Map 18, Parcel 21; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Jack Cushing, to read the same as the above article. He 
stated he needed this land to add to land he already owns to be able to 
develop his own land. This land has been deemed surplus by the town and 
a value of $ 58.880 placed on it by Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal 
Assessor. Finance Committee and Planning Board recommend approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 214 No 3.) 



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ARTICLE 29. (drawn as #5) To see if the town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen be 
and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as is 
owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall be 
determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and 
interest are described as Map 18, Parcel 22; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Motion by Jack Gushing to read the same as the above article. He 
stated he needs this parcel and another to develop land he currently 
owns. This land has been deemed surplus by the town and a value of 
$ 54,000 placed on it by Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal Assessor. 
Finance Committee and Planning Board recommend approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted. Yes 229 No 1.) 

ARTICLE 30. (drawn as #28) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of 
the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer 
needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the 
same, all in accordance with General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the 
Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in 
the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 
3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised. Said parcel and interest are described as Map 50, Parcel 65; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

A letter was received from Attorney Robert Peterson requesting Article 30 to 
be withdrawn. Planning Board recommends disapproval. Motion to pass over. 
Voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 31. (drawn as #24) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of 
the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer 
needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the 
same, all in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 30B; and further that the 
Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in 
the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 
3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised. Said parcel and interest are described as Map 50, Parcel 71; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Attorney Robert Peterson, to read the same as the above 
article. This land has been deemed surplus by the Town and a value of 
$ 2 , 500 placed on it by Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal Assessor. 
Finance Committee and Planning Board recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted. Yes 152 No 1.) 

ARTICLE 32. (drawn as #12) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to sell a certain parcel of land owned by the Town of 
Wilmington in accordance with Chapter 30B of the General Laws of Massachusetts 
and upon such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in 
accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington. Said parcel and interest are described as Map 94, Parcel 
46A; or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Henry Sullivan, requests that this article be withdrawn. 
Planning Board recommends approval. Motion to pass over. Voted 
unanimously. ) 



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ARTICLE 33. (drawn as #26) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to sell a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 82A on 
the Assessor's Map 67, subject to such terms and conditions of Chapter 30B, as 
the Selectmen may determine and further to set the minimum amount to be paid 
for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Richard Stewart reads the same as above article. This land 
has been deemed surplus by the town and a value of S 8.000 placed on it 
by Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal Assessor. Finance Committee and 
Planning Board recommend approval. Motion seconded and so voted.) 

ARTICLE 34. (drawn as #2) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to sell a certain parcel of Town-owned land adjacent to and abutting 
the property at 959 Main Street for the purpose of adding footage to the 
property at 959 Main Street required by the town for the proper setbacks, to 
erect a proposed building on that property. This petition will be subject to 
the contingency of the purchase of 959 Main Street. A secondary request would 
be to be able to lease this additional footage from the town for a specified 
number of years, for a sum determined by the Town of Wilmington; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

This land is not deemed surplus by the town. Planning Board recommends 
disapproval. Motion to pass over. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 35, (drawn as #29) To see if the town will vote to approve the 
filing of a petition in the General Court for an act relative to reduction in 
ranks for certain public employees in the Town of Wilmington, said act to be 
filed in the following form: 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court 
assembled, and by the authority of saune, as follows: 

SECTION 1. Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or special law 
or rule to the contrary, if permanent employees of the police force of 
the Town of Wilmington serving in any position in a title above the 
lowest title on such force are to be separated from such positions 
because of lack of money or the abolition of such positions, they shall 
be separated from such positions according to their seniority in such 
title based on their length of service after permanent promotion in such 
force and shall be reinstated to such positions held by them according 
to such seniority; provided, however, that this section shall apply only 
to reduction in force resulting in demotions from titles above the 
lowest title on such force to the next lower title or titles in 
succession in such force and shall not affect the seniority of any 
employee in service for any other purpose, including but not limited to, 
the separation of permanent employees from service on such force. 

SECTION 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

(Motion by Lt. Robert LaRivee of the Police Department to read the same 
as the above article. He stated that this way of determining reduction 
in rank is unfair and not the way it should be done and this would make 
a correction in civil service law. Town Manager stated there are no 
plans for any reduction in rank and that this should be a police union 
collective bargaining issue. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. 
Motion defeated.) 

ARTICLE 36. (drawn as #10) To see if the town will vote to amend Chapter 
592, Section 2A of the Town Charter, to include the following: Any person who 
holds an elected town office with more than six months remaining of the term 
of office may be recalled from the office by the voters in the manner herein 
provided when substantiated evidence of alleged allegations accompany grounds 
for recall of any elected official. 

(Motion by Anne D. Linehan to withdraw this article and asked the Board 
of Selectmen or Town Manager to refer to By-Law Study Committee so that 
they could deal with the legality of the language contained in our 
present recall section of charter. Motion seconded and so voted to 
withdraw. ) 



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ARTICLE 37. (drawn as #33) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to remove certain restrictions contained in a deed from the Town of 
Wilmington to Leo W. Campbell and Kathleen Campbell to allow the subdivision 
of a certain parcel of land shown as Parcel 32 on Assessor's Map 54, bounded 
and described as follows: 

SOUTHERLY by Garden Avenue 200 feet; 
WESTERLY by St. Paul Street, 100 feet; 

NORTHERLY by lots 535 and 502, as shown on said plan 200 feet; 
EASTERLY by Rhodes Street 100 feet. 

Being lots 247 through 252, containing 20,000 square feet as shown on a plan 
entitled, "Silver Lake Gardens Annex, No. Wilmington, Massachusetts owned by 
J. W. Wilbur Co., Inc. December 2, 1918, Scale 80 feet equals 1 inch, A. L. 
Eliot, C.E.;" or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Leo Campbell to read the same as above. He stated he bought 
this land about eleven years ago, and would like to lift restrictions to 
create a buildable lot for his children for the future. A value of 
S 63.000 placed on lifting of the deed restriction by Hunphrey J. 
Moynihan, Principal Assessor. Finance Committee and Planning Board 
recommend approval. Mr. Campbell decided to withdraw this article once 
he found out the price set by the Principal Assessor. Motion to 
withdraw. Voted unanimously. ) 

ARTICLE 38. (drawn as #9) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to remove certain restrictions contained in a deed from the Town of 
Wilmington to Joseph E. Albowicz recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of 
Deeds, Book 1960, Page 549, being the same premises conveyed to Mary A. Keefe, 
the petitioner, and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Book 
2447, Page 397; to allow the subdivision of a certain parcel of land shown as 
Parcel 157 on Assessor's Map 44, bounded and described as follows: 

NORTHERLY by Massachusetts Avenue, fifty (50) feet; 
EASTERLY by Lot 203 on a plan hereinafter mentioned, 
one hundred (100) feet; 

SOUTHERLY by Lot 208 on said plan, fifty (50) feet; and 
WESTERLY by Lot 206 on said Plan, one hundred (100) feet. 

Said premises were conveyed subject to the restriction for the benefit of the 
grantor that the premises conveyed shall become part of the grantee's 
contiguous premises, recorded at Middlesex North Registry of Deeds Book 2447, 
Page 397, and being further bounded and described as follows: 

NORTHERLY by Massachusetts Avenue, one hundred (100) feet. 
EASTERLY by River Street, one hundred (100) feet. 
SOUTHERLY by Lot 199, on said plan, one hundred (100) feet. 
WESTERLY by Lot 204, on said plan, one hundred (100) feet. 

Being lots 200 through 205 inclusive, containing 15,000 sc[uare feet all as 
shown on a plan entitled, " Pinegrove Park, Silver Lake, Massachusetts, by 
John S. Grossman, C.E.," recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, 
Plan Book 26, Plan 25; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Attorney Robert Scarano stated that petitioner, Mrs. Mary A. Keefe would like 
to split this lot to sell so that she could afford to remain on her property. 
Finance Committee and Planning Board recommends disapproval. A value of 
$ 26, 150 was placed on this property by Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal 
Assessor. The petitioner would not be able to buy for this price. Mr. 
Scarano asked to withdraw on his client's behalf. Motion to withdraw, voted 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 39. (drawn as #16) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
reassessment of surplus Town-owned land shown as Parcel 57 on the Assessor's 
Map 69 which is now assessed at $ 11 , 800 with a fair market value of $ 19 , 500 as 
of the Town Meeting of 1992. 

Petitioner was not present. Planning Board recommends disapproval. Motion to 
pass over voted unanimously. 



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ARTICLE 40. (drawn as #1) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to re- 
zone from General Business (GB) to High Density Business (HDB) the following 
described parcel: 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon situated in Wilmington, 
Middlesex County, bounded and described as follows: 

NORTHEASTERLY by Main Street, one hundred (100) feet; 
SOUTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Tennessee Gas 
Transmission Company, one hundred twenty-five (125) feet; 
NORTHEASTERLY again by said land now or formerly of 
Tennessee Gas Transmission Company, ninety- 
nine and 99/100 (99.99) feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY by Lot 2 as shown on plan hereinafter referred 
to, three hundred three and 82/100 (303.82) feet; 
SOUTHWESTERLY by land of the Boston and Maine R.R., ninety 
eight and 30/100 (98.30) feet; 

NORTHWESTERLY by land now or formerly of Patsy and Mary 

Calandrello, one hundred ninety and 51/100 (190.51) feet; 

SOUTHWESTERLY again by said land now or formerly of Patsy 

and Mary Calandrello, twenty-two and 35/100 (22.35) feet; 

NORTHWESTERLY again by said land now or formerly of Patsy 

and Mary Calandrello, eighty-nine and 090/1000 (89.090) feet 

and by land now or formerly of Luciano and Carmella M. Calandrello, one 

hundred (100) feet. 

Said parcel contains 1.2 acres, more or less, according to said plan and is 
shown as Lot 1 on plan entitled, "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass. for Don- 
Jon Realty Trust September 23, 1966, Dana F. Perkins and Sons, Inc., Civil 
Engineers and Surveyors," which plan is duly recorded at the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds; or to do anything else in relation thereto. 

Said parcel is shown as Parcel 11 on Assessor's Map 39. For Petitioner's 
title see Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds. 

Mr. Robert Spencer spoke on behalf of Richard Galante, owner of 685 Main 
Street. Motion reads as stated above. He stated he was one of the few 
residential abutters to this property. All of the abutters are in favor of 
this article. He seeks to rezone so that he can sell used vehicles. He would 
like to have about ten used cars. Mr. Galante has been a wonderful neighbor 
and an asset to the community and the area will be improved. Carole S. 
Hamilton, Planning Board, stated this is a non-conforming use. Finance 
Committee and Planning Board recommend disapproval. Motion required 2/3rds 
vote. Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 162 No 35. 

ARTICLE 41. (drawn as #21) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-Laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) the following 
described parcel of land: 

Lots B and C on a plan entitled, "Plan of Land in Wilmington, MA, April 13, 
1965, Dana F. Perkins & Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers & Surveyors," recorded in 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 101, Plan 161, and 
bounded and described as follows: 

Parcel 1 - Lot B ; 

SOUTHERLY by Burlington Avenue by three lines together measuring 176.31 
feet ; 

WESTERLY by Lot 32, as shown on said plan, 181.51 feet; 
SOUTHERLY by Lot 32, 124.89 feet; 

WESTERLY by two courses, 14.21 feet and 125.00 feet, 

respectively; 

SOUTHERLY 64.82 feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY 51.29 feet; the last four courses and distances being by 
Lot 1 as shown on said plan; 

SOUTHWESTERLY by Lots 31 and 30, as shown on said plan, 
177.48 feet; 



-124- 



WESTERLY by Lot 29, as shown on said plan, 90.73 feet; 

NORTHERLY by land now or formerly of Paul F. and Charlotte Minghello, by 
two courses together measuring 229.76 feet; 

WESTERLY again by seven courses, by land now or formerly of said 
Minghello, together measuring 319.61 feet; 

WESTERLY again, by land now or formerly of Daniel F. Cosman, 
et ux, by twelve courses together measuring 1,159.22 feet; 
NORTHEASTERLY and NORTHERLY by land now or formerly of Irving L. Jones, 
et ux, Nassau Avenue, Birch Road, land now or formerly of Elizabeth T. 
Fritch, and land now or formerly of Margaret C. Ardillo, by seven 
courses together measuring 855.71 feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY and EASTERLY by Lot C, as shown on said plan, by two 
courses, 640.00 feet, more or less, and 780.00 feet, more or less, 
respectively; 

SOUTHERLY by two courses together measuring 203.17 feet; 
EASTERLY 182.00 feet; 
SOUTHERLY 90.00 feet; 

EASTERLY again, 155.00 feet; the last five courses and distances being 
by Lot A, as shown on said plan. Containing 25 acres, more or less. 
Being all of said measurements more or less, or however otherwise the 
Seune may be bounded, measured or described. 

Parcel 2 - Lot C ; 

SOUTHERLY by Burlington Avenue by three courses together 
measuring 249.72 feet; 
WESTERLY 124.72 feet; 
NORTHERLY 37.23 feet; 
WESTERLY again 200.84 feet; 

SOUTHERLY 189.59 feet; the last four courses and distances being by Lot 
A, as shown on said plan; 

WESTERLY and NORTHWESTERLY by Lot B, as shown on said plan, 780.00 feet, 

more or less, and 640.00 feet, more or less respectively; 

NORTHERLY by land now or formerly of Margaret C. Ardillo, 

land now or formerly of George B. Gates and Ivy Court, by two courses 

together measuring 430.54 feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY and EASTERLY by Ivy Court, land now or formerly of Freeman 
A. Pearl, land now or formerly of Marcus Greenstein, et al, land now or 
formerly of Joseph F. Forbes, et ux. Beech Court and Tower Realty Trust, 
by six courses together measuring 7,515.94 feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of said Tower Realty Trust 79.93 
feet ; 

EASTERLY by Oak Court and land now or formerly of said Tower Realty 
Trust, 84.34 feet; 

EASTERLY by land now or formerly of Wilmington Housing Authority by 
five courses together measuring 576.64 feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY, EASTERLY and SOUTHEASTERLY by ten courses, by land 

now or formerly of said Wilmington Housing Authority, together 

measuring 870.29 feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly 

of George Keough, et ux 44.85 feet; 

SOUTHERLY by land now or formerly of said Keough and by 
land now or formerly of Nelson F. Huntley, et ux, 
by five courses together measuring 249.68 feet; 
SOUTHEASTERLY by land of said Huntley, 121.20 feet; 
SOUTHWESTERLY by said Burlington Avenue, as shown on said 
plan 60.46 feet; 
NORTHWESTERLY 230.00 feet; 
WESTERLY 149.11 feet; 

SOUTHERLY 113.00 feet; the last three courses and distances being by 
land now or formerly of Herbert D. Rierdon, et ux, 222.93 
feet; and 

SOUTHEASTERLY by said land of Walker, 173.34 feet; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Said parcels are shown as Parcel 18 on the Town of Wilmington Assessor's Map 
17. For petitioner's title see Middlesex North District Registry, Book 3272, 
Page 38; or do anything in relation thereto. 



-125- 



Motion by Attorney Robert Peterson as follows: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-laws and associated 
zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from 
Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) the following described 
parcel of land: 

Parcel 2 as shown on a "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., scale 1" = 
80', dated April 12, 1993, by Dana F. Perkins, Inc.," which is bounded 
and described as follows: 

PARCEL 2 



Beginning at a point on the northerly side of Burlington Avenue and at 
land now or formerly of Robert H. Coughlin; 



thence. 


N 


40" 13' 


48" 


E 


along 


land 


of 


said 


Coughlin 


a 


distance 


of 


195 


.00 


feet to 


a 


point; 


























thence. 


N 


49° 46' 


12" 


W along 


land 


of 


said 


Coughlin 


a 


distance 


of 


95. 


33 


feet to 


a 


point at land 


of now or 


formerly 


Laurence 


Kaufmann; 








thence, 


N 


42° 05' 


36" 


E 


along 


land 


of 


said 


Kaufmann 


a 


distance 


of 


131 


.24 


feet to 


a 


point; 


























thence. 


N 


11° 05' 


29" 


E 


along 


land 


of 


said 


Kaufmann 


a 


distance 


of 


40. 


00 


feet to 


a 


point; 


























thence. 


N 


46° 37' 


17" 


W 


along 


land 


of 


said 


Kaufmann 


a 


distance 


of 


202 


.08 


feet to 


a 


point; 


























thence, 


N 


87° 14' 


22" 


W 


along 


land 


of 


said 


Kaufmann 


a 


distance 


of 


155 


.00 


feet to 


a 


point; 


























thence, 


s 


11° 05' 


29" 


W 


along 


land 


of 


said 


Kaufmann 


a 


distance 


of 


132 


.13 



feet to a point at land of now or formerly Anne Mahoney; 
thence, N 78° 54' 31" W along land of said Mahoney a distance of 35.00 
feet to a point; 

thence, S 11° 05' 29" W along land of said Mahoney a distance of 35.00 
feet to a point; 

thence, N 78° 54' 31" W along land of said Mahoney a distance of 90.00 
feet to a point; 

thence, S 11° 05' 29" W along land of said Mahoney a distance of 175.00 

feet to a point on the northerly side of Burlington Avenue; 

thence, along the northerly side of Burlington Avenue on a curved line 

having a radius of 577.18 feet and a length of 25.00 feet to a point; 

thence, N 83° 17' 52" W along the northerly side of Burlington Avenue a 

distance of 25.11 feet to a point at land now or formerly of Roger 

Anderson; 

thence, N 11° 05' 29" E along land of said Anderson a distance of 215.09 
feet to a point; 

thence, N 78° 54' 31" W along land of said Anderson a distance of 194.77 
feet to a point at land now or formerly of Salvatore Spatola; 
thence, N 02° 45' 40" E along land of said Spatola a distance of 125.00 
feet to a point; 

thence, N 77° 16' 20" W along land of said Spatola a distance of 64.82 
feet to a point; 

thence, S 33° 05' 50" W along land of said Spatola a distance of 51.29 
feet to a point at land now or formerly of Margaret C. Leonard; 
thence, N 57° 27' 14" W along land of said Leonard and land now or 
formerly of John J. Morrison a distance of 177.48 feet to a point at 
land now or formerly of Henry W. Stemmler; 

thence, N 07° 53' 17" W along land of said Stemmler a distance of 90.73 
feet to a point at land now or formerly of Edward R. Lord; 
thence, N 85° 13' 45" E along land of said Lord a distance of 73.56 feet 
to a point; 

thence, N 84° 59' 53" E along land of said Lord a distance of 69.62 feet 
to a point; 

thence, N 86° 16' 47" E along land of said Lord a distance of 86.45 feet 
to a point; 

thence, N 03° 00' 41" W along land of said Lord a distance of 69.59 feet 
to a point at land now or formerly of Francis J. Logan; 
thence, N 09° 26' 47" E along land of said Logan a distance of 63.31 
feet to a point; 

thence, N 01° 38' 41" E along land of said Logan a distance of 102.15 



-126- 



feet to a point; 

thence, N 19° 11' 30" W along land of said Logan a distance of 36.91 
feet to a point; 

thence, N 07° 07' 20" W along land of said Logan a distance of 51.22 
feet to a point; 

thence, N 15° 43' 36" W along land of said Logan a distance of 23.06 
feet to a point at land now or formerly of Town of Wilmington; 
thence, all along land of Town of Wilmington, N 08° 10' 45" E a distance 
of 24.79 feet to a point; 



thence. 


N 


24° 


55' 


11" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


168.35 feet to 


a point ; 


thence. 


N 


16° 


23' 


07" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


120.78 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


N 


09° 


12' 


31" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


43.20 feet to a 


L point; 


thence. 


N 


19° 


21' 


07" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


58.22 feet to a 


L point; 


thence. 


N 


20° 


55' 


02" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


182.05 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


S 


41° 


42' 


14" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


424.70 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


N 


73° 


05' 


58" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


97.57 feet to a 


L point; 


thence. 


N 


06° 


37' 


32" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


169.97 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


N 


45° 


25' 


06" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


101.17 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


N 


85° 


19' 


44" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


392.29 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


S 


04° 


40' 


16" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


185.00 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


S 


85° 


19' 


44" 


W 


a 


distance 


of 


80.00 feet to a 


L point; 


thence. 


S 


04° 


40' 


16" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


470.00 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


S 


75° 


40' 


58" 


W 


a 


distance 


of 


30.00 feet to a 


L point; 


thence. 


S 


82° 


32' 


59" 


W 


a 


distance 


of 


551.94 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


S 


01° 


11' 


29" 


W 


a 


distance 


of 


163.20 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


S 


84° 


51' 


57" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


410.37 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


s 


43° 


59' 


58" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


305.92 feet to 


a point; 


thence, 


s 


09° 


44' 


35" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


370.21 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


s 


01° 


34' 


13" 


E 


a 


distance 


of 


221.21 feet to 


a point; 


thence. 


N 


65° 


21' 


13" 


W 


along land 


now or formerly of John L. 



and Alan L. Michel a distance of 410.93 feet to a point; 
thence, S 37° 41' 17" W along land of said Michel a distance of 173.41 
feet to a point on the northerly side of Burlington Avenue; 
thence, along the northerly side of Burlington Avenue on a curved line 
having a radius of 971.52 feet and a length of 125.13 feet to a point at 
land now or formerly of Robert H. Coughlin and also being the point of 
beginning. 

As shown on a Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 80', dated 
April 12, 1993, by Dana F. Perkins, Inc. Total area of Parcel 2 being 
27.47 plus or minus Acres. For Petitioner's title, see deed of James V. 
DeCarolis dated April 22, 1993 and recorded at Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds on April 23, 1993 as Document Number 21588. 

There are two proposed subdivisions. With the new plan they seek to 
rezone half of the parcel and donate the other half to the Conservation 
Commission. The original plan sought to rezone 45 acres and this one 
seeks to rezone 27 acres. This plan is endorsed by both the Finance 
Committee and the Planning Board. It represents a 41% reduction. This 
would allow builder Mark Lopez to cluster twenty-eight (28) homes on 
less land nearer to Burlington Avenue and not destroy or disturb 
wetlands. Greg Erickson, Board of Health Director, said to cluster the 
homes is, environmentally, a sound plan. There was discussion from 
abutters and neighbors both for and against this proposal. The impact 
to traffic on Burlington Avenue was also discussed. Motion seconded and 
vote taken. Requires 2/3rds vote. Yes 154 No 24. Quorum was also 
challenged at this time. Quorum present of 179. 

ARTICLE 42. (drawn as #24) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law by allowing limited seating in establishments classified as a sandwich 
shop under the provisions of Retail Stores definition by taking the following 
action: 

Delete in 3 . 5 Classification of Business Uses . 3.5.1 Retail Store under 
the definition of sandwich shop the following phrase, "with said foods to be 
consumed off the premises" and substitute the following phrase, "with up to 
twenty seats;" or do anything in relation thereto. 



-127- 



(David Harrington represented Christos Eliopoulos, the owner of Andrea's 
Pizza. Motion was made by Michael Castellano. Attorney Harrington 
stated the owner has been in business about a year and is operating at a 
loss. There are other pizza shops in the area that are allowed seating. 
Andrea's Pizza would just like the same chance. Finance Board 
recommends disapproval. Planning Board recommends approval. Austin 
Rounds, Planning Board, stated he voted against this, as this would 
effect small business throughout the community. Motion seconded and so 
voted. Yes 16 No 101. Motion fails.) 

ARTICLE 43. (drawn as #32) To see if the town will vote to change the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning from 
Residential 60 (R60) to Residential 20 (R20) the following described parcel of 
land: 

That certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington in the County of Middlesex 
and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, bounded and described as follows: 

NORTHEASTERLY by Lot 1, seven hundred twenty- five and 27/100 (725.27) 
feet ; 

EASTERLY by land now or formerly of Arthur W. Eames, four 
hundred eighty-nine and 80/100 (489.80) feet; 
SOUTHEASTERLY by Lot B and land now or formerly of James A. 
Bancroft, six hundred ninety and 19/100 (690.19) 
feet; and 

SOUTHWESTERLY by land now or formerly of Timothy Upton, six 
hundred twenty-seven and 91/100 (627.91) feet. 

All of said boundaries are determined by the Land Court to be located as shown 
on subdivision plan 3984-G, drawn by K. W. Kyle, Surveyor, dated October 19, 
1955, as approved by the Court, filed in the Land Registration Office, a copy 
of a portion of which is filed with Certificate of Title 10015, and said land 
is shown as Lot two (2) on said plan. Said parcel is also shown as Parcel IB 
on the Town of Wilmington Assessor's Map R-3. 

For Petitioner's title, see Certificate of Title No. 25295, recorded at 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Land Registration Office at Book 
129, Page 189; or do anything in relation thereto. Letter was received from 
Attorney Robert Peterson requesting withdrawal of this article. So voted to 
withdraw. 



ARTICLE 44. (drawn as #23) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone 
from General Industrial (GI) to Residential 20 (R-20) the following described 
parcel: 

A certain parcel of land situated in said Wilmington in the County of 
Middlesex and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, bounded and described as follows: 

EASTERLY by land now or formerly of E. R. Grabow Company, 
four hundred eighty-one and 45/100 (481.45) feet; 
SOUTHERLY eight hundred ninety-eight and 23/100 (898.23) 
feet; and 

WESTERLY three hundred thirty-one (331.00) feet by land now 
or formerly of PGA Realty Trust; 

NORTHWESTERLY by land now or formerly of Henry E. Brooks, 
two hundred eighty-nine (289.00) feet; and 
NORTHERLY by land now or formerly of Henry E. Brooks and 
of E. R. Grabow Company, six hundred seventy and 
24/100 (670.24) feet. 

For Petitioner's title see deed dated November 3, 1986 recorded at Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds at Book 3795, Page 95. Said property is also shown as 
Parcel 28A on Town of Wilmington Assessor's Map R-2; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 



-128- 



(Motion by Earl Hupper, reads the same as above. He stated he owns this 
land and would like to change zoning to R-20 so that he could develop 
the property. Finance Committee and Planning Board recommend 
disapproval. Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 84 No 16. Motion 
approved. Quorum questioned at this time. Quorum count taken. Present 
at time of vote 153.) 

ARTICLE 45. (drawn as #20) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by re-zoning from 
Residential 20 (R-20) to High Density Business (HDB) the following described 
premises: 

PARCEL ONE ; The land with the buildings thereon, if any, in Wilmington, 
Middlesex County, Massachusetts, being shown as Lot B on Plan entitled, "Plan 
of Land in Wilmington, Surveyed for Ernest J. and Marie E. Thibo, August, 

1955, Revised September 1, 1955, H. Kingman Abbott, Reg. Surveyor, Reading," 
recorded with the Northern Middlesex Registry of Deeds, bounded and described 
as follows: 

SOUTHERLY by Lowell Street, one hundred fifty (150) feet; 

WESTERLY by Lot A on said plan, one hundred fifty (150) feet; 

NORTHERLY by Lot A on said plan, one hundred fifty (150) feet; 

EASTERLY by land of John Elia on said plan, by two (2) lines, 

one hundred two and 81/100 (102.81) feet; 

and fifty-eight and 76/100 (58.76) feet; 

containing 20,656 square feet of land, more of less. 

PARCEL TWO : The land with buildings thereon, if any, in Wilmington, Middlesex 
County, Massachusetts, being shown as Lot C on a plan entitled "Revised Plan 
of Lot in Wilmington Surveyed for Ernest J. and Marie E. Thibo, September 4, 

1956, H. Kingman Abbott, Reg. Surveyor, Reading" recorded with the Northern 
Middlesex Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 88, Plan 119A, bounded and described 
as follows: 

SOUTHERLY by Lot B on said plan, one hundred fifty (150) feet; 

NORTHERLY by land of Ernest J. Thibo et ux Lot A, on said 

plan, one hundred forty-one and 54/100 (141.54) feet; 

EASTERLY by land of John Elia, on said plan, twenty-seven (27) feet. 

For Petitioner's title see deed of Joseph E. Doucette et ux dated April 6, 
1988 and recorded at Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Book 4477, Page 283. 

The above referenced parcels are shown as Parcel 1-A on Town of Wilmington 
Assessor's Map 72; or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by John Forest, "I move to amend the Zoning By-laws and 
associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by re-zoning from 
Residential 20 (R-20) and Neighborhood Business (NB) to High Density 
Business (HDB) the following described premises: the rest of the 
description reads the saune as above article. Finance Committee 
recommends disappoval, as they see little change from last year's 
article, which was defeated. The abutter's spoke on behalf of Mr. 
Forest stating their homes are now better protected, since the business 
properties will be closer to Lowell Street and 200 feet away from their 
homes. Selectman Michael V. McCoy stated John Forest originally was to 
put his gas station on this property, now it is two commercial 
properties. John Forest, stated he did propose to put his station there 
when the state was to take his station but he has paid taxes all these 
years and wants now to develop this property. Planning Board recommends 
approval. Vote to move the (juestion. Yes 206 No 1. Motion seconded 
and so voted. Requires 2/3rds vote. Yes 171 No 10.) 

With the completion of all articles, motion to adjourn was made at 7:33 P.M. 
There were a total of two hundred forty-eight (248) voters in attendance and 
forty-seven (47) non-voters. 



-129- 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY-1993 



TRANSFERS 



Total 
Appropriation 

194,561 



By Transfer 
194,561 



By Taxation 




SCHOOL BUDGET 
MUNICIPAL BUDGET 
CAPITAL OUTLAY 
WARRANT ARTICLES 
TOTAL BUDGET 

STATUTORY CHARGES 
TOTAL 

BONDING 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY-1994 

By Transfer 



Total 
Appropriation 



14,083,749 
16,727,965 
225,758 
7.250 
31.044.722 

4,228, 113 
35.272.835 

230,000 



1,939,509 
76,795 

2.016.304 



By Taxation 

14,083,749 
14,788,456 
146,963 
7.250 
29.026.418 



AVAILABLE FUNDS 
Cemetery Sales 
Cemetery Interest 
Highway Dept - Chapter 90 
Capital Project Closeout 
Water Anticipated Revenue 
Capital Stabilization 



25,000 

20,000 
370,991 

49,531 
1,473,987 

76.795 
2,016,304 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 6. 1993 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



The meeting was called to order by Town Moderator, James C. Stewart with a 
quorum present of one hundred fifty three voters (153) at 7:50 p.m. 

Chester A. Bruce, Jr., Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, "I move that the 
Moderator dispense with reading of warrant and take up all articles by 
number." Motion seconded. Articles will be by random draw as prescribed by 
the By-law. 

ARTICLE 4. (drawn as #1) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning By- 
law by allowing limited seating in establishments classified as a sandwich 
shop under the provisions of Retail Stores definition by taking the following 
action: 

Delete in 3 . 5 Classification of Business Uses , 3.5.1. Retail Store under 
the definition of sandwich shop the following phrase "with said foods to 
be consumed off the premises" and substitute the following "with up to 
twenty seats." (Petition) 

(Motion by Laurence Kaufman, 153 Burlington Ave., same as the wording in 
the warrant article. Planning Board and Finance Committee recommend 
disapproval. Town Moderator then ruled article out of order, for the 
following reason. According to Chapter 40A, Section 5 of Mass. General 
Laws, a Zoning By-law unfavorably acted upon by town meeting may not be 
reconsidered within 2 years unless Planning Board recommends to do so. 
The Town Moderator further explained that Anthony E. Penski, Assistant 
Attorney General informed him this article would not be approved by 
Attorney General's office if enacted. Also, an amendment to this article 
would not be approved. Discussion then held on Town Moderator ruling. 
In answer to question, Planning Board stated their vote on article was 
made in public session at November 23, 1993 public hearing. Planning 



-130- 



Board and Finance Committee stated they disapproved the article because 
there was no change from previous Town Meeting and Planning Board is 
working on changes to address this issue at the next annual Town 
Meeting. ) 

(Motion was then made by Laurence Kaufman, "I appeal the decision of the 
chair." Motion seconded. After much discussion, in which many in 
attendance spoke, and Town Counsel explained the procedure which called 
the Town Meeting and the process for additional appeal. He stated that 
he agrees with ruling made by the Town Moderator and Assistant Attorney 
General Penski. Appeal against Town Moderator recpiires a majority. The 
Town Moderator then addressed the meeting. He stated that he usually 
does not address issues that are before Town Meeting but when ruling of 
the chair is questioned he can and this is not a question of the merit of 
the zoning change but a matter of law. This article cannot move forward 
because it is against the law that this meeting is governed by. I urge 
you to uphold the integrity of the rules that govern this meeting. Vote 
taken to sustain the decision of the chair. So voted in the 
affirmative. ) 

ARTICLE 3. (drawn as #2) To see if the town will vote to release to the 
Reading Municipal Light Department certain utility easements for electric 
transmission located in various subdivisions in the Town of Wilmington and to 
authorize the Planning Board to accept easements consistent with the purpose 
of the Subdivision Control Law, all as contained in General Law Chapter 41; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

The quorum was then cpiestioned at this point but then question was withdrawn 
by Laurence Kaufman. Town Manager Michael A. Caira, "I move that the town 
vote to release to the Reading Municipal Light Department certain utility 
easements for electric transmission located in various subdivisions in the 
Town of Wilmington and to authorize the Planning Board to accept easements 
consistent with the purpose of the Subdivision Control Law, all as contained 
in General Law Chapter 41." Motion seconded. Finance Committee and Planning 
Board recommend approval. This article is concerning new subdivisions and 
does not effect subdivisions already approved by the town. This allows 
builders to use underground facilities and conform to requirements of Reading 
Municipal Light. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 2. (drawn as #3) To see if the town will vote to authorize its 
Treasurer/Collector to enter into a compensating balance agreement or 
agreements for a term not to exceed three fiscal years pursuant to M.G.L., 
Chapter 44, Section 53F; or do anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Michael A. Caira, Town Manager, "I move that the town vote to 
authorize its Treasurer/Collector to enter into a compensating balance 
agreement or agreements for a term not to exceed three fiscal years 
pursuant to M.G.L., Chapter 44, Section 53F. Motion seconded. This 
article allows Town Treasurer to deposit funds and by competitive bid 
process maintain balances in various banks with no cost to town. It 
should have been placed on the Annual Town Meeting last April but was 
omitted. Approval of Town Meeting needed every three years. Finance 
Committee and Planning Board recommend approval. Motion voted 
unanimously. ) 

ARTICLE 1. (drawn as #4) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum or sums of 
money for the operation of various town departments and expenses; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Motion by Michael A. Caira, Town Manager. He stated there are three 
separate motions. (1.) "I move that the town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of S 404. OOP for Wilmington School System." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 



-131- 



(2.) "I move that the town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
S 63.287 for the Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational District. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. The Town Manager explained that these 
amounts were agreed upon at Town Meeting in April, 1993 but because the 
town was not sure of the way they would be funded through a grant or 
cherry sheet, these amounts must now be approved and voted at a Town 
Meeting. No new monies are involved. Motion seconded and so voted 
unanimously. 

(3.) "I move that the town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
S I. 500 for the purpose of joining with other communities to investigate 
the legality of the MWRA method of assessment, said funds to be 
transferred from available Sewer Revenue." Motion seconded. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Diane M. Allan, Selectman, addressed this 
motion and stated that we would be joining with other communities and 
sending a message to the state and the MWRA about the unfairness of their 
assessment. This could assist the six hundred (600) families on sewer in 
Wilmington. Frank West, 2 Birchwood Road asked if this is Phase 1 of 
series of expenses? Diane M. Allan stated that we are involved in a fact 
finding and no other money is being committed. Various opinions were 
expressed for and against this article. Motion so voted.) 

Motion to adjourn at 8:47 P.M. seconded and so voted. A total of one 
hundred seventy-nine voters (179) and twenty non-voters (20) were in 
attendance. 



-132- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



AND REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



June 30, 1993 



Members of the Board of Selectmen 

and Town Manager 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 



The General Purpose Financial Statements of the Town of Wilmington, 
Massachusetts, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1993, are submitted 
herewith. This report was prepared by the Town Accountant. Responsibility 
for both the accuracy of the presented data and the completeness and fairness 
of the presentation, including all disclosures, rests with the Town. 

I believe the data, as presented, is accurate in all material aspects; that it 
is presented in a manner designed to fairly set forth the financial position 
and results of operations of the town as measured by the financial activity of 
its various funds; and that all disclosures necessary to enable the reader to 
gain the maximum understanding of the town's financial affairs have been 
included. 



Respectfully submitted. 




-133- 



Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts 
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 
Table of Contents 



FINANCIAL SECTION PAGE 

Combined Balance Sheet - All Fund Types and Account Group 135 

Notes to Financial Statements 137 

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances - All Governmental Fund 

Types and Expendable Trust Funds 140 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances - Special Revenue Accounts 142 

Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared with 
Authorization by Function and Activity - General Fund 144 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Water Department 
Operations 152 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Capital Project Fund 153 

Schedule of Debt Retirement 154 

Schedule of Trust Funds 155 



-134- 



TOUN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMBINED BALANCE SHEET 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
JUNE 30, 1993 
(AUDITED) 

SPECIAL CAPITAL TRUST LONG-TERM 

GENERAL REVENUE PROJECTS AGENCY DEBT TOTAL 

ASSETS 

CASH 670.773 339,932 426,021 1,062,a41 2,499,567 

INVESTMENTS AT COST 

RECEIVABLES: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 1,055,955 1,055,955 

TAXES IN LITIGATION 

TAX LIENS 889,398 889,398 

TAX FORECLOSURES 13,445 13,445 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 397,325 397,325 

DEPARTMENTAL 92,603 92,603 

OTHER 414,448 556,429 970,877 

DUE FROM OTHER GOVERNMENTS . 

INV.DEF.COMP.PLAN 336,168 336,168 

TAX DEFERRALS 

AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR 

PAYMENT OF NOTES 

AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR 

RETIRE OF LONG TERM DEBT 18,054,951 18,054,951 

TOTAL ASSETS 3.533,947 896,361 426,021 1.399,009 18,054,951 24,310,289 

LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCES 
LIABILITIES: 

NOTES PAYABLE-ANTIC 1,500,000 1,500,000 

OF BOND ISSUE 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 1,197,849 110,658 235,255 1,543,762 

SALARIES PAYABLE 

OTHER LIABILITIES 519,418 519,418 

SCHOOL TEACHER SAL-DEFRD 

EMPLOYEE UTHDNGS-PAYABLE 

DUE TO OTHER GOVERNMENTS 

ACCRUED VACATION/SICK 

LEAVE BENEFITS 9,354,951 9,354,951 

DEFERRED REVENUE 2,723,119 556,429 3,279,548 

RESERVE FOR ABATEMENTS 978,096 978,096 

GENERAL OBLIG BONDS PAY 8,700,000 8,700.000 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 6.399.064 667.087 754.673 18.054,951 25.875.775 



-135- 



FUND BALANCES 
RESERVE FOR ENCUMBRANCES 
DESIGNATED FOR SPEC PURP 
UNRESERVED: 

DESIGNATED FOR SUBSEQ 

YEARS EXPENDITURES 
DESIGNATED FOR OVER/ 

UNDER ASSESSMENTS 
DESIGNATED FOR UNPRVD 
ABATES & EXEMPTIONS 
UNRESERVED-UNDESIGNATED 

TOTAL FUND BAL'S 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 
& FUND BAL'S 



510,028 289,567 

(3,375,145) (60,293) 426,021 

(2,865,117) 229,274 426,021 

3,533,947 896,361 426,021 



799,595 

321,141 321,141 








323,195 (2,M6,222) 

644,336 (1,565,486) 

1,399,009 18,054,951 24,310,289 



-136- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
June 30, 1993 



Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of the Town of 
Wilmington conform to generally accepted accounting principles for local 
governmental units except as indicated in Note 2. The following is a 
summary of the significant accounting policies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The Town reports its financial activities in several funds and one 
account group in order to comply with the limitations and 
restrictions placed on both the resources made available to the 
Town and the services provided. The various funds are grouped in 
the financial statements in this report into five generic fund 
types and two broad fund categories as follows: 

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

General Fund - The general fund is the general operating fund of 
the Town. It is used to account for all financial resources 
except those required to be accounted for in another fund. 

Special Revenue Fund - This special revenue fund is used to 
account for the proceeds of the State and Local Fiscal Assistance 
Act and their expenditures as prescribed by the Office of Revenue 
Sharing. 

Special Revenue Funds - Others - This special revenue fund is used 
to account for the proceeds of specific revenue resources (other 
than general revenue sharing, expendable trust or major capital 
projects) that are legally restricted to expenditures for specific 
purposes . 

Capital Projects Fund - This fund is used to account for the 
purchase or construction of major capital facilities. 

FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

Trust and Agency Funds - Trust and agency funds are used to 
account for assets by the Town in a trustee capacity or as an 
agent for individuals, private organizations, other governments 
and/or other funds. These include expendable trust, non- 
expendable trust and agency funds. Non-expendable trust funds are 
accounted for in a manner that permits the periodic measurements 
of revenues earned, expenses incurred and/or net income in order 
to demonstrate maintenance of capital. Expendable trust funds are 
accounted for in essentially the same manner as governmental 
funds. Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal 
liabilities) and do not involve measurement of results of 
operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-Term Debt and Liabilities - Long-term liabilities expected to 
be financed from governmental funds are accumulated in the general 
long-term debt group of accounts. This account group is not a 
fund. It is only concerned with the measurement of financial 
position and, therefore, is not involved with a measurement of the 
results from any operations. 



-137- 



B. Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared 
principally on the modified accrual basis of accounting. This 
method recognizes revenues when they become measurable and 
available. Expenses are recognized under this method as they are 
incurred. 

Revenue Recognition - Property tax revenues are recognized when 
they become available. Available means then due or past due and 
receivable within the current period or expected to be collected 
soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the 
current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when cash is 
received. Receipts during the sixty days immediately following 
the close of the fiscal year are also recognized as available 
revenue . 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to inter- 
governmental revenues, the legal and contractual requirements of 
the numerous individual programs are used as guidance. There are, 
however, essentially two types of these revenues. In one, monies 
must be expended on the specific purpose or project before any 
amounts will be paid to the Town. Therefore, revenues are 
recognized based upon the expenditures recorded. In the other, 
monies are virtually unrestricted as to purpose of expenditure and 
are usually revocable only for failure to comply with prescribed 
compliance requirements. These resources are reflected as 
revenues at the time of receipt or earlier if the susceptible to 
accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses - Expenditures are recorded during the year on a cash 
disbursement basis. In addition, as required by Massachusetts 
General Laws, disbursements made during the fifteen days 
immediately following the close of each fiscal year and which 
pertain to the prior year are recorded as warrants payable and 
expenses as of June 30th. 

Purchase orders outstanding at June 30th related to annual 
operating expenses are recorded as encumbrances and, accordingly, 
as a reservation of fund balances at that date. 

Deferred Revenue - Property taxes and other revenues that are 
measurable but not available have been classified as deferred 
revenue on June 30, 1993. 

Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 
For years prior to 1985, the Town presented its financial statements on 
the basis of accounting practices prescribed by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department of Revenue. These practices differed in many 
significant respects from G.A.A.P. 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised uniform 
municipal accounting system entitled "U.M.A.S." The departures from 
G.A.A.P. under this revised system have been significantly narrowed. 
The Town has adopted a modified U.M.A.S. for its financial statement 
presentation for 1985. 

The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the Town of 
Wilmington's financial statements are: 

a. Retirement benefits are provided for a "pay-as-you-go" basis 
rather than an acceptable actuarial cost method (see note 5). 



-138- 



General fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as expenditures 
the time purchases are made rather than being capitalized in i 
general fixed asset group of accounts. 



-139- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1993 



Fiduciary 

Governmental Fund Types Fund Types 









ial 
Spec 1 a 


■ 

Capi tdl 


Expendabl e 


Combined Total 




General 


G6n6ra I 


evenue 


'''^Fund*^ 




( MefDorandum 


REVENUES: 




Fund 


Fu 


Fu 


Fu 


Only) 














Taxes and excise 




, TOO, f f u . uu 


00 






?7 OAA 77n nn 
c J , yoo , / f u . uu 


Licenses and permits 


379 910 59 


c 1 y , • uu 


0.00 






£ 1 y , •♦J J . uu 


Investment income 


Ai mo ni 
01,1 uy . u 1 


H£ , 1 00 . UU 


1 898 . 87 




11 119.00 


55 205.87 


Intergovernmental 


1 AAA 1 1 
1 , Cjj , 000. 1 1 


A nAA A?7 nn 


1 675 610.15 






5 742 037.15 


Payments in lieu of taxes 




5^7 771 nn 
cj f , f J 1 . uu 


0.00 






PS? 7^1 nn 

cjffiji, uu 


Special assessments 


CC.\J , 1 HO > H£ 


61 109,00 


3 448.48 






64 557.48 


Departmental and other 


H,Hyt , Or £ . IH 


5 n7A 7XL nn 

C , U r , / jH . UU 


3 439 773.13 






5 514 507.13 


F i nes 




AQ7 n'^n on 

HTt , U JU • UU 


0.00 






492 030.00 


Unclassified 


201,787.50 


210,807.00 


171,838.37 




811,296.00 


1,193,941.37 


Total Revenues 


31,079,892.63 


31,391,229.00 


5,292,569.00 


0.00 


822,415.00 


37,506,213.00 


CArcriL/i iui\c.Oa 














General Government 


879,583.10 


879,333.00 


381,291.78 






1 ,260,624.78 


Public Safety 


3,671,065.86 


3,600,984.00 


21,828.33 






3,622,812.33 


Public Works 


102,207.87 


3,055,671.00 


1,991,993.42 






5,047,664.42 


Comnunity Development 


3,373,709.99 


343,709.00 


35,373.45 






379.082.45 


Publ ic Bui Idings 


343,709.41 


1,752,068.00 


0.00 






1,752,068.00 


Human Services 




514,294.00 


125,809.75 






640,103.75 


Education 


1,792,231.62 


13,305,623.00 


1,397,562.88 






14,703,185.88 


Maturing Debt & Interest 


13,322,363.66 


2,802,399.00 


0.00 






2,802,399.00 


Unclassified 


402,449.23 


2,890,545.00 


11,541.59 




692,349.00 


3,594,435.59 


Statutory Charges 


24,757.17 


3,088,315.00 


0.00 






3,088,315.00 


Warrant Articles 


2,802,398.82 


6,888.00 


0.00 






6,888.00 


Capital Outlay 


2,907,202.61 


- 185,822.00 


0.00 


37,213.00 




223,035.00 


Litigation 


6,887.57 


1,500,000.00 


0.00 






1,500,000.00 


Total Expenditures 


29,628,566.91 


33,925,651.00 


3,965,401.20 


37,213.00 


692,349.00 


38,620,614.20 


Excess (deficiency) of 














Revenues over Expenditures 


1,451,325.72 


(2,534,422.00) 


1,327,167.80 


(37,213.00) 


130,066.00 


(1,114,401.20) 



OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES): 
Proceeds of General 
Obligation Bonds 



-140- 



> 



Operating Transfers In 1,352,693.00 1,352,693.00 1,352,693.00 

Operating Transfers Out (1,317,693.00) (35,000.00) (1,352,693.00) 

State and County Charges 0.00 0.00 

Court Judgements 0.00 0.00 

Total Other Financing 

Sources (Uses) 1,352,693.00 1,352,693.00 (1,317,693.00) 0.00 (35,000.00) 0.00 



Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 
over Expenditures and Other 

Uses 2,804,018.72 (1,181,729.00) 9,474.80 (37,213.00) 95,066.00 (1,114,401.20) 



Fund Balance July 1, 1992 (2,109,633.00) (1,683,388.00) 219,799.00 463,234.00 228,129.00 (772,226.00) 

Increase in Provision for 

Abatements and Exemptions (570,818.09) 
Decrease in Provision for 

School Litigation 



Fund Balance June 30, 1993 1,265,203.81 (2,865,117.00) 229,273.80 426,021.00 323,195.00 (1,886,627.20) 



-141- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES. EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1993 



Gifts Reserved for Revolving 
Appropriation Funds 



REVENUES: 

Taxes and excise 
Licenses and permits 
Investment income 
Intergovernmental 
Payments in lieu of taxes 
Special assessments 
Departmental and other 
Fines 

Unclassified 

Total Revenues 











0.00 




0.00 










0.00 




0.00 


1.823.97 


74.90 






1,898.87 




1,898.87 


,542,699.13 




10,176.00 


78,986.02 ' 


1,631,861.15 


43,749.00 


1.675,610.15 










0.00 




0.00 










0.00 


3,448.48 


3.448.48 




2.570.34 


65,637.93 


828,233.38 


896,441.65 


2,543,331.48 


3,439,773.13 










0.00 




O.OG 










0.00 


171,838.37 


171,838.37 



1.544.523.10 2.645.24 75.813.93 907.219.40 2.530,201.67 2,762,367.33 5.292,569.00 



EXPENDITURES: 

General Government 381,291.78 
Public Safety 21,828.33 
Public Works 277,484.32 
Community Development 35,373.45 
Public Bui Idings 

Human Services 21,807.73 

Education 607,234.96 

Maturing Debt & Interest 

Unclassified 11,541.59 

Statutory Charges 

Warrant Articles 

Capital Outlay 

Litigation 

Total Expenditures 1,356.562.16 



381.291.78 381,291.78 
21,828.33 21,828.33 
277,759.32 1,714,234.10 1,991,993.42 



35,373.45 
0.00 

104,002.02 125,809.75 
790,327.92 1,397,562.88 
0.00 
11,541.59 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



0.00 



275.00 894,329.94 2.251,167.10 1,714,234.10 3,965.401.20 



Excess (deficiency) of 

Revenues over Expenditures 187.960.94 



2.645.24 75,538.93 12.889.46 279.034.57 1,048,133.23 1,327. 167. J 



OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES): 

Proceeds of General 0.00 
Obligation Bonds 0.00 



-142- 



Operating Transfers In 0.00 

Operating Transfers Out (19,000.00) (19, 000. 00)(1 ,298, 693. 00)(1 ,317,693.00) 

State and County Charges 0.00 

Court Judgements 0.00 

Total Other Financing 

Sources (Uses) 0.00 0.00 (19,000.00) 0.00 ( 19, 000. 00)(1 ,298, 693. 00)( 1 ,317,693.00) 



Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 
over Expenditures and Other 

Uses 187,960.94 2,6A5.24 56,538.93 12,889.46 260,034.57 (250,559.77) 9,474. 



Fund Balance July 1, 1992 (333,235.59) 9,367.41 141,762.82 51,238.08 (130,867.28) 350,666.28 219,799.00 

Increase in Provision for 

Abatements and Exemptions 
Decrease in Provision for 

School Litigation 



Fund Balance June 30, 1993 (145,274.65) 12,012.65 198,301.75 64,127.54 129,167.29 100,106.51 229,273.80 



-143- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1993 







AMNT CFWD TO 
FY 93 FROM 
FISCAL 1992 


APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 1993 


TRANSFER & 
APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 1993 


EXPENDED 
FISCAL 1993 


CARRY FORWARD 
FISCAL 1993 


CLOSEOUT 
FISCAL 1993 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

Selectmen 
Selectmen 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


1,400.00 
7,000.00 


1,400.04 
7,000.00 


1.400.04 
6,632.10 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
367.90 






0.00 


8,400.00 


8,400.04 


8,032.14 


0.00 


367.90 


Elections 
Elections 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


17,042.00 
2,430.00 


17,105.96 
2.430.00 


16,361.06 
2.430.00 


0.00 
0.00 


744.90 
0.00 






0.00 


19,472.00 


19,535.96 


18,791.06 


0.00 


744.90 


Registrars 
Registrars 
Registrars 


Salaries 

Constable 

Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


1,690.00 
100.00 
4,035.00 


1,720.00 
100.00 
4,035.00 


1,720.00 
100.00 
4.035.00 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 






0.00 


5,825.00 


5,855.00 


5,855.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Finance Conm. 
Finance Coirm. 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


1,200.00 
3,600.00 


1,200.00 
3,600.00 


484.00 
3,600.00 


0.00 
0.00 


716.00 
0.00 






0.00 


4,800.00 


4,800.00 


4,084.00 


0.00 


716.00 


Town Manager 
Town Manager 
Town Manager 


Sal -Town Manager 
Sal. Other 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


65,000.00 
163,425.00 
44,440.00 


74,997.09 
166,413.42 
44.453.50 


74,997.09 
166,413.42 
42,374.97 


0.00 
0.00 
400.00 


0.00 
0.00 
1,678.53 






0.00 


272,865.00 


285,864.01 


283,785.48 


400.00 


1,678.53 


Town Accountant 
Town Accountant 
Town Accountant 


Sal -Town Accountant 
Sal. Other 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


50,665.00 
51,539.00 
2,020.00 


52.184.90 
52,644.33 
2.020.00 


52,184.90 
52,644.33 
1,700.53 


0.00 
0.00 
319.47 


0.00 
0.00 
(0.00) 






0.00 


104,224.00 


106.849.23 


106,529.76 


319.47 


(0.00) 


Treas/Col lector 
Treas/Col lector 
Treas/Col lector 


Sal -Treas/Col lector 
Sal. Other 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
1,125.00 


49,558.00 
96,763.00 
26,960.00 


51.039.10 
99.980.95 
26.986.82 


51,039.10 
99,980.95 
26,425.32 


0.00 
0.00 
1,686.50 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 






1,125.00 


173,281.00 


178.006.87 


177,445.37 


1,686.50 


0.00 


Town Cleric 


Sal-Town Clerk 


0.00 


35,943.00 


37.021.22 


37,021.22 


0.00 


0.00 



-144- 



TOUN OF UILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1993 







AHNT CFUD TO 




TRANSFER & 












FY 93 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 






FISCAL 1992 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


Town Clerk 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


31,531.00 


32,473.71 


32,473.71 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Clerk 


Expenses 


1,048.14 


1,541.00 


3,541.00 


4,547.35 


0.00 


41.79 






1,048.14 


69,015.00 


73,035.93 


74,042.28 


0.00 


41.79 


Assessors 


Sal-Prin. Assessor 


0.00 


51,080.00 


57,448.23 


57,448.23 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


57,896.00 


59,588.03 


59.588.03 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Expenses 


0.00 


26,800.00 


28,732.57 


28.732.57 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


A.T.B. Legal 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Appraisals,EDP 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


• 




0.00 


135,776.00 


145,768.83 


145.768.83 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Counsel Contractual Services 


0.00 


55,000.00 


55,000.00 


54.999.96 


0.00 


0.04 






0.00 


55,000.00 


55,000.00 


54,999.96 


0.00 


0.04 


Permanent E 


Jldg Conn Salaries 


0.00 


1,200.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Permanent E 


ildg Comm Expenses 


0.00 


250.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


1 ,450.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


General 


Government Subtotal 


2,173.14 


850,108.00 


883, 115.87 


879,333.88 


2,405.97 


3,549.16 


PROTECTION 


OF PERSONS & PROPERTY: 














Police 


Salary- Chief 


0.00 


64,259.00 


66,186.14 


66,186.14 


0.00 


0.00 


Pol ice 


Sal. -Dep. Chief 


0.00 


51,353.00 


52.888.51 


52,888.51 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Lieut. 


0.00 


93,263.00 


75,921.00 


75,921.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Sgts. 


0.00 


236,616.00 


240,547.06 


240,547.06 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal . -Patrolmen 


0.00 


967.460.00 


977,174.84 


977.174.84 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal . -Clerical 


0.00 


56,396.00 


58,142.13 


58.142.13 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Fill In Costs 


0.00 


195,981.00 


195.981.00 


195.981.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Pd. Holidays 


0.00 


59,745.00 


59.745.00 


59.692.93 


0.00 


52.07 


Police 


Sal. -Specialist 


0.00 


10,200.00 


10.200.00 


10.200.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal . - Incentive 


0.00 


33,800.00 


33,800.00 


33.800.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Night Diff 


0.00 


29,160.00 


31,512.00 


31.512.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Expenses 


4,391.27 


110,780.00 


110,780.00 


115,158.18 


0.00 


13.09 


Police 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


10,120.00 


7,096.00 


7,096.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


D.A.R.E. Program 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 



-145- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1993 







AMNT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 












FY 93 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 






FISCAL 1992 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 






4,391.27 


1,919,133.00 


1,919,973.68 


1,924,299.79 


0.00 


65.16 




Sal . -Chief 


0.00 


61,011.00 


69,048.23 


69,048.23 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal. -Dep. Chief 


0.00 


77,763.00 


80,209.22 


80,209.22 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal. -Lieut. 


0.00 


197,316.00 


245,359.94 


245,359.94 


0.00 


0.00 


F i r6 D6pt ■ 


Sal . -Privates 


0.00 


809,689.00 


860,802.78 


883,552.26 


0.00 


(22,749.48) 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Clerk/Disptch 


0.00 


53,946.00 


48.791.00 


48,736.01 


0.00 


54.99 


F i re Dept . 


Sal . -Overtime Costs 


0.00 


135,000.00 


136,343.42 


136,343.42 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal. -Pd. Holidays 


0.00 


63,342.00 


63.369.53 


63,369.53 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Incentive/EMT 


0.00 


54,300.00 


54.300.00 


54,300.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-O.T. Fire Alarm 


0.00 


8,920.00 


9.810.87 


9,797.75 


0.00 


13.12 


Fire Dept. 


Expenses 


0.00 


47,337.00 


47,835.78 


47,972.18 


0.00 


(136.40) 


Fire Dept. 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


10,121.00 


9.562.00 


9.561.55 


0.00 


0.45 


Fire Dept. 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


1,518,745.00 


1.625.432.77 


1,648,250.09 


0.00 


(22,817.32) 


Emer. Mgmt. 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,600.00 


1.600.00 


1,600.08 


0.00 


(0.08) 


Emer. Mgmt. 


Expenses 


0.00 


1,400.00 


1,400.00 


1,399.92 


0.00 


0.08 






0.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Animal Control 


Contract Services 


0.00 


19,080.00 


19,080.00 


19,080.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Animal Control 


Expenses 


0.00 


5,300.00 


5,300.00 


6,354.00 


0.00 


(1,054.00) 






0.00 


24,380.00 


24,380.00 


25.434.00 


0.00 


(1.054.00) 


Prot. Persons & Prop. Subtotal 


4.391.27 


3,465,258.00 


3.572.786.45 


3,600.983.88 


0.00 


(23,806.16) 


PUBLIC WORKS: 
















Engineering Div. 


Salaries 


0.00 


86,703.00 


89,297.46 


89.297.46 


0.00 


0.00 


Engineering Div. 


Expenses 


0.00 


3,800.00 


3,800.00 


828.88 


0.00 


2,971.12 






0.00 


90,503.00 


93,097.46 


90,126.34 


0.00 


2,971.12 


Highway Division 


Sal-D.P.W. Super. 


0.00 


65,980.00 


67,959.50 


67,959.50 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Division 


Sal. -Other 


0.00 


739,118.00 


691,311.00 


668,267.46 


0.00 


23,043.54 


Highway Division 


Expenses 


40.00 


496,412.00 


138,063.62 


119.977.79 


2,384.76 


15,741.07 


Highway Division 


Sidewalks 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 



-146- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1993 









AMNT CFWD TO 
FY 93 FROM 
F;SCAL 1992 


APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 1993 


TRANSFER & 
APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 1993 


EXPENDED 
FISCAL 1993 


CARRY FORWARD 
FISCAL 1993 


CLOSEOUT 
FISCAL 1993 


Highway Divis 


on 


Rd. Mach. Exp. 


0.00 


60,000.00 


57,418.65 


54,725.75 


2.030.73 


662.17 


Highway Divis 


on 


Fuel & Other 


0.00 


109,805.00 


116,037.53 


110,425.08 


3.955.48 


1,656.97 


Highway Divis 


on 


Drainage Projects 


0.00 


15,000.00 


15,000.00 


4,154.99 


9,142.35 


1,702.66 


Highway Divis 


on 


Public St. Lights 


0.00 


174,136.00 


174,136.00 


173,906.16 


0.00 


229.84 


Highway Divis 


on 


C90M 


26,980.8A 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


26,980.84 


0.00 


Highway Divis 


on 


C81M 


1,207.75 


60,796.00 


60,796.00 


45,695.86 


16,307.89 


0.00 









28,228.59 


1,721 


247.00 


1,320,722.30 


1,245,112.59 


60,802.05 


43,036.25 


Snow & 


Ice Control 


Salaries 


0.00 


111 


683.00 


137,315.92 


137,115.92 


0.00 


200.00 


Snow & 


Ice Control 


Expenses 


0.00 


184 


942.00 


222,191.97 


222,154.10 


0.00 


37.87 



Highway Division Rubbish Collection 



0.00 296,625.00 359,507.89 359,270.02 



6,571.38 1,114,513.00 1,115,583.02 1,012,521.68 109,632.72 



237.87 
(0.00) 





6,571.38 


1,114,513.00 


1,115,583.02 


1,012,521.68 


109,632.72 


(0.00 


Tree Division Salaries 
Tree Division Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


85,664.00 
12,297.00 


75,017.95 
12,297.00 


75,017.95 
5,334.59 


0.00 
27.50 


0.00 
6,934.91 




0.00 


97,961.00 


87,314.95 


80,352.54 


27.50 


6,934.91 


Parks & Grounds Div. Salaries 
Parks & Grounds Div. Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


123,947.00 
28,353.00 


125,979.96 
28,353.00 


125,979.96 
23,846.42 


0.00 
301.26 


0.00 
4,205.32 




0.00 


152,300.00 


154,332.96 


149,826.38 


301.26 


4,205.32 


Cemetery Division Salaries 
Cemetery Division Expenses 


0.00 
20,000.00 


110,248.00 
25,497.00 


113,474.29 
15,497.00 


113,474.29 
4,987.93 


0.00 
5,164.46 


0.00 
25,344.61 




20,000.00 


135,745.00 


128,971.29 


118,462.22 


5,164.46 


25,344.61 


Public Works Subtotal 


54,799.97 


3,608.894.00 


3.259.529.87 


3,055,671.77 


175,927.99 


82,730.08 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: 

Board of Health Sal-Director 0.00 43,437.00 44,739.57 44,739.57 0.00 0.00 

Board of Health Sal-Other 0.00 68,759.00 68,759.00 68,293.25 0.00 465.75 

Board of Health Expenses 764.40 4,900.00 4,900.00 5,490.27 0.00 174.13 

Board of Health Hospital & Medical 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 



-147- 



TOUN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1993 







AMNT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 












FY 93 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 






FISCAL 1992 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


Board of Health 


Mental Health 


0.00 


14,581 .00 


14,581 .00 


14,580.96 


0.00 


0.04 






764.40 


131,677.00 


132,979.57 


133,104.05 


0.00 


639.92 


Sealer/Wght & Meas. 


Salaries 


0.00 


3,600.00 


3 , 600 . 00 


3 , 600 . 00 


0.00 


0.00 


Sealer/Wght & Meas. 


Expenses 


0.00 


80.00 


80.00 


80.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


3,680.00 


3,680.00 


3,680.00 


0.00 


0.00 


P lan/Conservat i on 


Sal-Director 


0.00 


42,109.00 


43,371.78 


43,371.78 


0.00 


0.00 


Plan/Conservation 


Sal -Other 


0.00 


52,877.00 


53,543.44 


53,543.44 


0.00 


0.00 


P I an/Conservat i on 


Expenses 


42.00 


5,190.00 


4,190.00 


3,601.65 


630.35 


0.00 






42.00 


100,176.00 


101,105.22 


100,516.87 


630.35 


0.00 


Bldg. Inspector 


Sal-Bldg Inspector 


0.00 


43,437.00 


44,739.56 


44,739.56 


0.00 


0.00 


Bldg. Inspector 


Sal. Other 


2.952.21 


44,347.00 


56,494.05 


59,446.26 


0.00 


0.00 


Bldg. Inspector 


Expenses 


0.00 


3,272.00 


3,272.00 


2,222.67 


0.00 


1,049.33 






2,952.21 


91,056.00 


104,505.61 


106,408.49 


0.00 


1,049.33 


Community Development Subtotal 


3,758.61 


326,589.00 


342,270.40 


343 , 709 . 4 1 


630.35 


1 ,689.25 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS: 
















Publ ic Bui Idings 


Sal -Super. 


0.00 


59,499.00 


61,284.39 


61,284.39 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Sal-Other 


0.00 


1,072,502.00 


1,108,873.58 


1,108,873.58 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Bui Idings 


Fuel Heating 


3,708.53 


223,543.00 


209,391.00 


213,099.53 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Electric-Town Bldgs. 


0.00 


78,533.00 


72,000.00 


72,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Utilities-Town Bldgs 


35.25 


75,750.00 


76,181.76 


76,217.01 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Expenses-Town Bldgs. 


0.00 


60,060.00 


61,009.64 


60,127.15 


17.38 


865.11 


Public Buildings 


Expenses-School Bldg 


5,924.00 


93,940.00 


93,940.00 


99,351.05 


0.00 


512.95 


Public Bui Idings 


Asbestos Repair 


3,797.19 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


2,292.29 


0.00 


4,504.90 


Public Bui Idings 


Roof Repairs 


719.37 


7,550.00 


7,550.00 


7,550.00 


0.00 


719.37 


Public Bui Idings 


HVAC Repairs 


1,273.00 


50,000.00 


50,000.00 


51,273.00 


0.00 


0.00 






15,457.34 


1,724,377.00 


1,743,230.37 


1,752,068.00 


17.38 


6,602.33 


Public Bui Idings 


Subtotal 


15,457.34 


1,724,377.00 


1,743,230.37 


1,752,068.00 


17.38 


6,602.33 



-148- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1993 



AMNT CFWD TO TRANSFER & 

FY 93 FROM APPROPRIATION APPROPRIATION EXPENDED CARRY FORWARD CLOSEOUT 
FISCAL 1992 FISCAL 1993 FISCAL 1993 FISCAL 1993 FISCAL 1993 FISCAL 1993 



HUMAN SERVICES: 
Veterans 
Veterans 
Veterans 


Salary 

Expenses 

Assistance 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


5,200.00 
160 . 00 
15,000.00 


5,200.00 
1 , 273 . 98 
18,524.19 


4,959.00 
1 ,273.98 
18,524.19 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


241.00 
0.00 
0.00 






0.00 


20,360.00 


24,998.17 


24,757.17 


0.00 


241.00 


Library 
Library 
Library 
Library 


Salary-Director 
Salaries-Other 
Expenses 
M.V.L.C. 


0.00 
0.00 
132.00 
0.00 


47,232.00 
215,079.00 
45,110.00 
20,835.00 


48,649.07 
220,329.25 
45,177.47 
20,835.00 


48,649.07 
219,337.74 
44,866.74 
20,826.00 


0.00 
0.00 
194.92 
0.00 


0.00 
991 .51 
247.81 

9.00 






132.00 


328,256.00 


334,990.79 


333,679.55 


194.92 


1,248.32 


Recreation 
Recreation 
Recreat i on 


Salary-Director 

Salaries-Other 

Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


47,232.00 
20,080.00 
? sno no 


47,232.00 
20,080.00 
? snn nn 


46,964.98 
19,714.16 
2 090.54 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


267.02 
365.84 
409.46 






00 


oy ,o ic ■ uu 


AO R17 nn 


Aft 7AO Aft 

oo , 1 oy . oo 


00 


1 042 32 


Elderly Services 
Elderly Services 
Elderly Services 


Salary-Director 

Salaries-Other 

Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
101.34 


31,498.00 
21,288.00 
30,018.00 


32,442.02 
23.416.75 
30,018.00 


32,442.02 
23,336.75 
30,105.33 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
80.00 
14.01 






101.34 


82,804.00 


85,876.77 


85,884.10 


0.00 


94.01 


Historical Cornn. 
Historical Coinn. 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
1,779.00 


800.00 
850.00 


800.00 
850.00 


610.75 
477.22 


0.00 
1,533.00 


189.25 
618.78 






1,779.00 


1,650.00 


1,650.00 


1.087.97 


1,533.00 


808.03 


Handicapped Conm. 
Handicapped Cornm. 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


600.00 
300.00 


600.00 
300.00 


63.00 
52.45 


98.00 
0.00 


439.00 
247.55 






0.00 


900.00 


900.00 


115.45 


98.00 


686.55 


Human Services 


Subtotal 


2.012.34 


503,782.00 


518,227.73 


514,293.92 


1.825.92 


4,120.23 


EDUCATION: 
School Dept. 


Appropriation 


96,757.26 10.090,975.00 10,091,836.72 10,061,092.91 


127.501.07 


0.00 



-149- 



TOUN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1993 

AMNT CFWD TO TRANSFER & 

FY 93 FROM APPROPRIATION APPROPRIATION EXPENDED CARRY FORWARD CLOSEOUT 
FISCAL 1992 FISCAL 1993 FISCAL 1993 FISCAL 1993 FISCAL 1993 FISCAL 1993 



School Dept. Expenses 231,640.09 2,009,666,00 2,021,289.47 2.151,331.40 101,598.16 (0.00) 

328,397.35 12,100,641.00 12,113,126.19 12,212,424.31 229,099.23 0.00 

Regional Vocational Shawsheen Vocational 0.00 1,093,199.00 1,093,199.00 1,093,199.00 0.00 0.00 

0.00 1,093,199.00 1,093,199.00 1,093,199.00 0.00 0.00 

Education Subtotal 328,397.35 13,193,840.00 13,206,325.19 13,305,623.31 229,099.23 0.00 



DEBT SERVICE: 
Debt & Interest 
Debt & Interest 
Debt & Interest 
Debt & Interest 
Debt & Interest 



Schools 

Gen. Government 

Sewer 

Water 

Auth. Fees & Misc. 



Debt & Interest Subtotal 



0.00 1,113,289.00 1,113,289.00 1,113,289.00 0.00 

0,00 99,113.00 99,113.00 99,113.00 0.00 

0.00 645,854.00 645,854.00 645,854.00 0.00 

0.00 879,364.00 879,364.00 879,364.00 0.00 

0.00 127,120.00 77,120.00 64,778.82 0.00 

0.00 2,864,740.00 2,814,740.00 2,802,398.82 0.00 12,341.18 

0.00 2,864,740.00 2,814,740.00 2,802,398.82 0.00 12,341.18 



UNCLASSIFIED: 



Veterans' Retirement 


2,893,92 


34,479.00 


31,979.00 


32,935.08 


0.00 


1,937.84 


Employ. Retire. Unused Sick Leave 


0.00 


20,667.00 


83,446.25 


83,446.25 


0.00 


0.00 


Medicare Employers' Contr. 


0.00 


67,512.00 


76,542.65 


76,542.65 


0.00 


0.00 


Unemployment Payments 


0.00 


10,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Salary Adj. & Add. Costs 


5,410.37 


35,376.00 


15,897.57 


21,307.94 


0.00 


0.00 


Local Trans/Training Conf. 


0.00 


6,300.00 


1,800.00 


994.06 


0.00 


805,94 


Out of State Travel 


0.00 


1,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0,00 


Computer Hardware & Software 














Ma int. & Expenses 


0.00 


42,046.00 


43,821.16 


43,821.16 


0.00 


0.00 


Microf i Im Projects 


0.00 


1,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Annual Audit 


17,500,00 


17,500.00 


13,900.00 


26,800.00 


4,600.00 


0,00 


Ambulance Bi 1 1 ing 


0,00 


10,000.00 


7,603.70 


7,603.70 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Report 


0,00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


0.00 


0,00 


Hazardous Mat. Consult. Ser. 


0,00 


5,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0,00 


Reserve Fund 


0.00 


70,000.00 


7,317.11 


0.00 


0.00 


7,317,11 


Litigation 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,500,000.00 


0.00 (1,500,000.00) 


Insurance & Bonds 


18,171.08 


645,506.00 


594,717.00 


559,373.94 


1,204.50 


52,309.64 



-150- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1993 





AMNT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 












FY 93 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY 


FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 




FISCAL 1992 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1993 


Enployee Health & Life Insurance 


0.00 


2,130,665.00 


2,271,828.68 


2,032,720.28 


239,108.40 


0,00 


Unclassified Subtotal 


43,975.37 


3,102,051.00 


3,153,853.12 


4,390,545.06 


244,912.90 (1 


,437,629,47) 


Ant. Cert. Coll. Tax Title 


0.00 


26,000.00 


27,057.08 


26,349.22 




0.00 


707,86 


Current Year Overlay 


0.00 


600,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0,00 


Prior Year Overlay Deficit 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0,00 




0.00 


0,00 


Retirement Contributions 


0.00 


1,304,903.00 


1,304,903,00 


1,317,611,44 




0.00 


(12,708,44) 


Teachers Retirement 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0,00 




0.00 


0,00 


County Retirement Tax 


0.00 


42,334.00 


42,333.00 


42,333,34 




0.00 


(0,34) 


Offset Items 


0.00 


62,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 


Special Education 


0.00 


4,250.00 


54.00 


1,081.00 




0.00 


(1,027.00) 


Mass Bay Trans Auth. 


0.00 


375,000.00 


379,799.00 


379,173.00 




0.00 


626.00 


MAPC (Ch.688 of 1963) 


0.00 


3,750.00 


3,660.00 


3,660.00 




0.00 


0,00 


Excise Tax (Ch. 727 of 1962) 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0,00 


Energy Cons. Pro. Assessment 


b.oo 


19,916.00 


19,916.00 


19,916.00 




0.00 


0.00 


Air Pollution Cont. Dist. 


0.00 


4,400.00 


4,409.00 


4,409.00 




0.00 


0,00 


Mosquito Control Program 


0.00 


23,100.00 


23,033.00 


22,928.00 




0.00 


105,00 


M.U.R.A. Sewer Assessment 


0.00 


1,529,493.00 


1,270,854.00 


1,270,854.00 




0.00 


0,00 


Statutory Charges Subtotal 


0.00 


3,995,646.00 


3,076,018.08 


3,088,315.00 




0.00 


(12,296.92) 


UARRANT ARTICLES: 
















Memorial Day/Veterans Day 


0.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


3,672.00 




0.00 


1,328,00 


Lease Quarters-Marines, VFW, Legion 


0.00 


2,250.00 


2,250.00 


1,500.00 




0.00 


750.00 


Arts Counci I 


1,715.57 


0.00 


0.00 


1,715.57 




0.00 


(0.00) 


Warrant Articles Subtotal 


1,715.57 


7,250.00 


7,250.00 


6,887.57 




0.00 


2,078.00 


CAPITAL OUTLAY: 
















Police Purchase Cruisers 


73,635.00 


0.00 


0.00 


73,625.00 




0.00 


10.00 


Highway Division Pickup Trucks 


65,56A.00 


0.00 


0.00 


57,434.00 


8, 


130.00 


0.00 


Publ ic Bui Idings Chairlifts 


29,924.99 


0,00 


0.00 


22,903.23 




0.00 


7,021.76 


Elderly Services Van 


15,121.00 


0.00 


0.00 


15,120.35 




0.00 


0.65 


School Dept. Van 


16,741,00 


0,00 


0.00 


16,740.35 




0.00 


0.65 


Capital Outlay Subtotal 


200,985.99 


0.00 


0.00 


185,822.93 


8, 


130.00 


7,033.06 



TOTAL 657,666.95 33,642,535.00 32,577,347.08 33,925,653.55 662,949.74 (1,353,589.26) 



-151- 



TOWN OF UILHINGTON 
WATER DEPARTMENT 
ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 



REVENUES: 

WATER RECEIVABLES RATES 
WATER RECEIVABLES SERVICES 
WATER RECEIVABLES INSTALLATIONS 
WATER RECEIVABLES INDUSTRIAL 
WATER RECEIVABLES CONNECTIONS 
WATER RECEIVABLES FIRE PROT. 
WATER RECEIVABLES CROSS CONN. 
WATER LIENS 
SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 
MISCELLANEOUS 
BOND PROCEEDS 
REIMBURSEMENTS 

TOTAL REVENUE: 

OPERATING COSTS 

PROJECT CLOSEOUTS 

CONSTRUCTION COSTS 

CLOSEOUT TO MAI NT. & OPERATIONS 

TOTAL OPERATING COSTS: 

EXCESS REVENUES OVER OPERATING COSTS 

TRANSFERS TO GENERAL FUND FOR 
DEBT SERVICE, EMPLOYEES BENEFITS 
AND ALLOCATED CHARGES 

EXCESS OF EXPENDITURES AND 
TRANSFERS OVER REVENUES 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE - BEGINNING 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE - ENDING 



ACTUAL FISCAL 


ACTUAL FISCAL 


ACTUAL FISCAL 


ACTUAL FISCAL 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


2,616,698.62 


2,668,584.28 


2,546,351.30 


2,404,215.47 


21,805.62 


14,683.94 


10,941.05 


11,974.79 


873. U 


2,229.40 


0.00 


0.00 


32.904.10 


30,140.91 


20,929.75 


15,227.93 


62.840.00 


29,930.00 


89,664.67 


66,100.00 


30.457.29 


30,257.29 


29,836.69 


29,865.29 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


3,840.00 


37,937.06 


79,173.10 


96,183.07 


95,793.02 


5,072.51 


5,497.72 


2,978.06 


3,448.48 


28,746.52 


9,062.00 


13,441.16 


88,153.35 


0.00 


700,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


854,098.77 


739,130.04 


0.00 


43,749.00 


3,691,433.63 


4,308,688.68 


2,810,325.75 


2,762,367.33 


1,410,168.43 


1,432,759.97 


1,795,898.97 


1,714,234.10 


0.00 


22,604.14 


0.00 


0.00 


1,705,941.96 


737,322.06 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(22,604.14) 


0.00 


0.00 


3,116,110.39 


2,170,082.03 


1,795,898.97 


1,714,234.10 


575,323.24 


2,138,606.65 


1,014,426.78 


1,048,133.23 


1,050.000.00 


1,172,910.00 


1,164,506.00 


1,298,693.00 


(474,676.76) 


965,696.65 


(150,079.22) 


(250,559.77) 


9,725.61 


(464,951.15) 


500,745.50 


350,666.28 


(464,951.15) 


500,745.50 


350,666.28 


100,106.51 



-152- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINING STATEMENTS OF REVENUES, 
EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1993 

(ENGINEERING) 



Town Meeting Dates 


STREET 
BETTERMENTS 


SEWER 
CONSTRUCTION 


N.E. SEWER 
INTERCEPTOR 
4/23/88 


MAIN ST. 

SEWER 
4/22/89 


FUEL OIL TANK 
REPLACEMENT 
4/23/88 


HIGH SCHOOL 
RENOVATION 


(MEMORANDUM 
ONLY) 


Initial Project Authorization 


95,550 


1,210,000 


450,000 


747,000 


420,000 


7,750,000 


10,672,550 


REVENUES: 

Intergovernmental 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Total Revenue 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


EXPENDITURES: 

Capital Outlay 

Total Expenditures 
Excess of revenues over/under 

expenditures 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


19,960.01 
(19,960.01) 


0.00 
0.00 


17,252.00 
(17,252.00) 


37,212.01 
(37,212.01) 


Other Financial Sources (uses): 
Proceeds of General 

Obligation Bonds & Notes 
Operating transfers 

Total Other Financial 
Sources/Uses 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 



Excess of Revenues 

and other sources over 
(under) expenditures and 
other uses 

FUND BALANCE JULY 1, 1992 

FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 1993 



0.00 0.00 
43,121.13 234,742.46 
43,121.13 234,742.46 



0.00 (19,960.01) 0.00 (17,252.00) (37,212.01) 

7,266.68 141,439.44 6,409.75 30,253.92 463,233.38 
7,266.68 121,479.43 6,409.75 13,001.92 426,021.37 



-153- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF LONG TERM DEBT-PRINCIPAL 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1993 



YEAR YEAR PRINCIPAL OUTSTANDING BOND BOND OUTSTANDING 

DESCRIPTION ISSUE DUE RATE AMOUNT JUNE 30, 1992 ADDITIONS RETIREMENTS JUNE 30, 1993 

INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 

Sewer Bonds 03-73 03-93 4.8 264,000 10,000 - 10,000 

Sewer Bonds 07-77 07-98 5.0 1,865,000 480,000 - 80,000 400,000 

Sewer Bonds 05-82 05-97 9.5-10.4 2,890,000 890,000 - 200.000 690.000 

Street Bonds 11-90 11-98 6.8-6.85 110.000 95.000 - 15.000 80.000 

Remodeling 11-90 11-98 6.85 420.000 365,000 - 55.000 310.000 

Sewer Planning 11-90 11-94 6.8-6.85 337,500 222,500 - 112.500 110,000 

Sewer-Main Street 11-90 11-98 6.8-6.85 745,000 670.000 - 75.000 595.000 

School Boilers 11-90 11-99 6.8-6.85 852,500 757,500 - 97.500 660.000 



TOTAL INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 



OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 

High School Bonds 01-85 01-95 8 

School Renovation 08-86 08-96 5.8-5.9 

Water Plant 07-79 07-98 5.25 

Water Plant 08-86 08-96 5.8-5.9 

Water Land Purchase 08-92 08-96 4.25 

Water Standpipe 11-90 11-00 6.8-8.85 

TOTAL OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 

TOTAL DEBT 



7,484,000 


3,490,000 





645.000 


2,845,000 


6.500,000 


1,950,000 




650.000 


1,300,000 


1.250.000 


600,000 




130,000 


470,000 


2.735,000 


900,000 




150.000 


750,000 


3.700.000 


1,850.000 




370.000 


1,480,000 


700.000 




700,000 




700,000 


1,425.000 


1,290,000 




135.000 


1,155,000 


16,310,000 


6,590.000 


700,000 


1,435.000 


5,855.000 


23,794,000 


10,080,000 


700,000 


2,080,000 


8,700.000 



-154- 





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-155- 



Boards Coounittees & Commissions 



Meeting Dates & Times 



Board, Committee, Commission 



Date 



Building 



Time 



APPEALS, BOARD OF 

ARTS, COUNCIL FOR THE 

ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 

CARTER LECTURE FUND 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

DISABILITIES, WILMINGTON COMM. 

ELDERLY SERVICES COMMISSION 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

HEALTH, BOARD OF 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

PLANNING BOARD 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

RECYCLING ADVISORY COMM. 

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

REG. VOC./TECH. SCHOOL COMM. 

REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

SELECTMEN, BOARD OF 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

WATER fic SEWER COMMISSION 



2nd & 4th Tuesday 4 Town Hall 7:00 p.m 

2nd Wednesday Arts Center 7:00 p.m 

2nd & 4th Thursday 2 Town Hall 9:30 a.m- 
As Needed 

3rd Thursday Cemetery 1:00 p.m 

1st & 3rd Wednesday 9 Town Hall 7:00 p.m 

Monthly 4 Town Hall 6:00 p.m 

3rd Tuesday Sr. Center 2:30 p.m 

2nd Tuesday 9 Town Hall 7:30 p.m 

1st & 3rd Monday 4 Town Hall 5:15 p.m 

2nd Monday 4 Town Hall 7:30 p.m 

1st Tuesday Deming Way 7:30 p.m 

2nd Thursday 9 Town Hall 7:30 p.m 

3rd Tuesday Library 7:30 p.m 

Monthly Town Hall 7:00 p.m 

1st & 3rd Tuesday 9 Town Hall 7:30 p.m 

1st Thursday 8 Town Hall 7:00 p.m 

Monthly Town Hall 6:30 p.m 

3rd Thursday Chamber Office 7:00 p.m 

2nd & 4th Tuesday Shaw. Tech. 7:30 p.m 

2nd Monday 12 Town Hall 7:00 p.m 

2nd & 4th Wednesday LIB High School 7:00 p.m 

2nd & 4th Monday 9 Town Hall 7:00 p.m 
As Needed 

Monthly AUD Town Hall 6:00 p.m 



-156- 



** Notes ** 



-157- 



) 



* * For Your Information * 



Department Phone Directory 



Department 

Accountant 
Animal Control 

Arts Center 
Assessor 

Board of Selectmen Office 
Building Inspector 
Cemetery Department 
Collector of Taxes 
Credit Union 

Department of Public Works 
Elderly Services 
Engineer 

Financial Director 
Fire Department 

Health, Board of 
Housing Authority 
Library 

Nurse 

Planning/Conservation 
Plumbing Inspector 
Police Department 



Public Buildings Department 
Recreation Department 
School Department 
Town Clerk 
Town Manager 

Treasurer 
Tree Department 
Veteran's Agent 
Water Department 
Water Pumping Station 



Telephone Niuuber 

694-2029 

658-5071 (Complaints) 
658-7845 (Missing/Adoption) 

657- 3887 

658- 3675 
658-3311 
658-4531 
658-3901 
658-3531 
658-5394 
658-4481 

657- 7595 

658- 4499 
658-3531 

658-3346 (Business Phone) 

658-3200 (EMERGENCY) 

658-4298 

658-8531 

658-2967 

657- 4625 (TDD) 

658- 4298 
658-8238 
658-3223 
658-5071 

658-3331 (EMERGENCY) 

657- 8368 (TDD) 

658- 3017 
658-4270 
694-6000 
658-2030 
658-3311 
694-1417 (TDD) 
658-3531 
658-2809 
694-2040 
658-3116 
658-4711 



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A Special "thank you" to all those who contributed 
photographs for the enhancement of our Annual Report. 



ADRIANNE J. BERE 
BEVERLY J. D ALTON 
ROBERT S. HANRAHAN 
CAROLYN M. KENNEY 
ARLENE A. SURPRENANT 
COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS 
ELDERLY SERVICES 
FIRE DEPARTMENT 
PLANNING BOARD 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 

RECREATION 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 
LOWELL SUN 
WILMINGTON TOWN CRIER 



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